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1.  Understanding DNA Repair in Hyperthermophilic Archaea: Persistent Gaps and Other Reasons to Focus on the Fork 
Archaea  2015;2015:942605.
Although hyperthermophilic archaea arguably have a great need for efficient DNA repair, they lack members of several DNA repair protein families broadly conserved among bacteria and eukaryotes. Conversely, the putative DNA repair genes that do occur in these archaea often do not generate the expected phenotype when deleted. The prospect that hyperthermophilic archaea have some unique strategies for coping with DNA damage and replication errors has intellectual and technological appeal, but resolving this question will require alternative coping mechanisms to be proposed and tested experimentally. This review evaluates a combination of four enigmatic properties that distinguishes the hyperthermophilic archaea from all other organisms: DNA polymerase stalling at dU, apparent lack of conventional NER, lack of MutSL homologs, and apparent essentiality of homologous recombination proteins. Hypothetical damage-coping strategies that could explain this set of properties may provide new starting points for efforts to define how archaea differ from conventional models of DNA repair and replication fidelity.
doi:10.1155/2015/942605
PMCID: PMC4471258  PMID: 26146487
2.  Sulfolobus Mutants, Generated via PCR Products, Which Lack Putative Enzymes of UV Photoproduct Repair 
Archaea  2011;2011:864015.
In order to determine the biological relevance of two S. acidocaldarius proteins to the repair of UV photoproducts, the corresponding genes (Saci_1227 and Saci_1096) were disrupted, and the phenotypes of the resulting mutants were examined by various genetic assays. The disruption used integration by homologous recombination of a functional but heterologous pyrE gene, promoted by short sequences attached to both ends via PCR. The phenotypic analyses of the disruptants confirmed that ORF Saci_1227 encodes a DNA photolyase which functions in vivo, but they could not implicate ORF Saci_1096 in repair of UV- or other externally induced DNA damage despite its similarity to genes encoding UV damage endonucleases. The success of the gene-disruption strategy, which used 5′ extensions of PCR primers to target cassette integration, suggests potential advantages for routine construction of Sulfolobus strains.
doi:10.1155/2011/864015
PMCID: PMC3139894  PMID: 21785574
3.  Loss of genetic accuracy in mutants of the thermoacidophile Sulfolobus acidocaldarius  
Archaea  2001;1(1):45-52.
To investigate how hyperthermophilic archaea can propagate their genomes accurately, we isolated Sulfolobus acidocaldarius mutants exhibiting abnormally high rates of spontaneous mutation. Our isolation strategy involved enrichment for mutator lineages via alternating selections, followed by screening for the production of spontaneous, 5-fluoro-orotate-resistant mutants in micro-colonies. Several candidates were evaluated and found to have high frequencies of pyrE and pyrF mutation and reversion. Neither an increased efficiency of plating of mutants on selective medium, nor the creation of a genetically unstable pyrE allele, could be implicated as the cause of these high frequencies. The strains had elevated frequencies of other mutations, and exhibited certain phenotypic differences among themselves. A large increase in sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents was not observed, however. These properties generally resemble those of bacterial mutator mutants and suggest loss of functions specific to genetic accuracy.
PMCID: PMC2685545  PMID: 15803658
5-fluoro-orotic acid; hyperthermophilic archaea; mismatch repair; mutator mutants; spontaneous mutation

Results 1-3 (3)