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1.  Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance in Burkholderia pseudomallei 
doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2014.06.003
PMCID: PMC4195405  PMID: 25245211
Burkholderia; Pseudomallei; Melioidosis; Co-trimoxazole; Resistance; Susceptibility; Treatment; Cambodia; Laos
2.  Treatment and prophylaxis of melioidosis 
Melioidosis, infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei, is being recognised with increasing frequency and is probably more common than currently appreciated. Treatment recommendations are based on a series of clinical trials conducted in Thailand over the past 25 years. Treatment is usually divided into two phases: in the first, or acute phase, parenteral drugs are given for ≥10 days with the aim of preventing death from overwhelming sepsis; in the second, or eradication phase, oral drugs are given, usually to complete a total of 20 weeks, with the aim of preventing relapse. Specific treatment for individual patients needs to be tailored according to clinical manifestations and response, and there remain many unanswered questions. Some patients with very mild infections can probably be cured by oral agents alone. Ceftazidime is the mainstay of acute-phase treatment, with carbapenems reserved for severe infections or treatment failures and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (co-amoxiclav) as second-line therapy. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole) is preferred for the eradication phase, with the alternative of co-amoxiclav. In addition, the best available supportive care is needed, along with drainage of abscesses whenever possible. Treatment for melioidosis is unaffordable for many in endemic areas of the developing world, but the relative costs have reduced over the past decade. Unfortunately there is no likelihood of any new or cheaper options becoming available in the immediate future. Recommendations for prophylaxis following exposure to B. pseudomallei have been made, but the evidence suggests that they would probably only delay rather than prevent the development of infection.
doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2014.01.005
PMCID: PMC4236584  PMID: 24613038
Melioidosis; Burkholderia pseudomallei; Treatment; Prophylaxis; Antibiotics
3.  Human β-defensin-3 alters, but does not inhibit, the binding of Porphyromonas gingivalis haemagglutinin B to the surface of human dendritic cells 
Human β-defensin-3 (HBD3) is a small, cationic, host defence peptide with broad antimicrobial activities and diverse innate immune functions. HBD3 binds to many microbial antigens and, in this study, we hypothesised that the known binding of HBD3 to Porphyromonas gingivalis recombinant haemagglutinin B (rHagB) alters, but does not inhibit, the binding of rHagB to human dendritic cells. To test this, human myeloid dendritic cells were incubated for 5 min with rHagB, HBD3 + rHagB (10:1 molar ratio), HBD3 or 0.1 M phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (pH 7.2) and were then rapidly fixed and processed for confocal microscopy and ultramicrotomy. rHagB and HBD3 could be detected with primary monoclonal mouse antibody to rHagB (MoAb 1858) or polyclonal rabbit antibody to HBD3 (P241) and secondary fluorescent-labelled anti-mouse or anti-rabbit antibodies (confocal microscopy) or protein A–colloidal gold (immunoelectron microscopy). In cells incubated with rHagB only, fluorescence and protein A–colloidal gold were seen at the cell surface and throughout the cytoplasm. In cells incubated with HBD3 + rHagB, fluorescence was observed only at the cell surface in a ‘string of pearls’ configuration. Overall, these results suggest that HBD3 binding to rHagB alters, but does not inhibit, the binding of rHagB to human myeloid dendritic cells.
doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2012.03.007
PMCID: PMC3371132  PMID: 22578747
Defensins; Human β-defensin-3; HBD3; Porphyromonas gingivalis; Haemagglutinin B; Dendritic cells; Confocal microscopy
4.  Database screening and in vivo efficacy of antimicrobial peptides against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 
Natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates for developing a generation of new antimicrobials to meet the challenge of antibiotic-resistant pathogens such as meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). To facilitate the search for new candidates, we have utilised the Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD), which contains natural AMPs from bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. This study demonstrates the identification of novel templates against MRSA by screening 30 peptides selected from the APD. These peptides are short (<25 residues), cysteine-free, cationic and represent candidates from different biological sources such as bacteria, insects, arachnids, tunicates, amphibians, fish and mammals. Six peptides, including ascaphin-8, database-screened antimicrobial peptide 1 (DASamP1), DASamP2, lycotoxin I, maculatin 1.3 and piscidin 1, were found to exert potent antimicrobial activity against an MRSA USA300 isolate. Although five of the six peptides showed broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, DASamP1 displayed killing of MRSA in vitro but not of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, DASamP1 suppressed early biofilm formation in a mouse model of catheter-associated MRSA infection. DASamP1 is a novel, short and potent peptide that will be a useful starting template for further developing novel anti-MRSA peptides.
doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2012.02.003
PMCID: PMC3320733  PMID: 22445495
Antimicrobial peptides; Biofilms; Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
5.  Effect of vinyl sulfone inhibitors of cysteine proteinases on Tritrichomonas foetus infection 
Tritrichomonas foetus is a sexually transmitted protozoon that causes genital inflammation and adverse pregnancy outcomes in cattle. Cysteine proteinases (CPs) released by T. foetus degrade immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies, complement component 3 and matrix proteins as well as inducing apoptosis of bovine genital epithelial cells. In this study, the efficacies of the vinyl sulfone CP inhibitors K11777 and WRR-483 were tested against CPs of T. foetus. The activity of secreted T. foetus CPs in culture supernatants was decreased in the presence of vinyl sulfone inhibitors. Inhibitor K11777 reduced the in vitro cytopathogenic effects of T. foetus in bovine foetal trophoblast cells, which are relevant target cells since this pathogen interferes with pregnancy. Pre-treatment of T. foetus prior to intravaginal inoculation diminished genital infection in a murine model. Therefore, vinyl sulfone CP inhibitors reduce several effects of T. foetus-secreted CPs, including cytotoxicity on relevant target host cells and genital infection in a murine model. These inhibitors have potential as chemotherapeutic agents against bovine trichomoniasis. Generalisation to human trichomoniasis requires further study.
doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2011.09.026
PMCID: PMC3279618  PMID: 22104282
Tritrichomonas foetus; Trichomonad cysteine proteinase; Cysteine proteinase inhibitors
6.  Mouse salivary glands and human β-defensin-2 as a study model for antimicrobial gene therapy: technical considerations☆ 
Transduction of salivary glands with antimicrobial peptide genes has great potential for oral infection control. Our ultimate goal is to introduce antimicrobial peptide genes into salivary glands that secrete these peptides into saliva to control bacterial/fungal infection in the oral cavity. However, an animal study model to test this potential has not been established. Therefore, we determined to test (i) whether the potent antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) can be overexpressed in saliva after transduction of salivary glands and (ii) whether oral fungal infection can be developed in a NOD/SCID murine model. Lentiviral vector SIN18cPPTRhMLV bearing hBD-2 cDNA was introduced into SCID mouse submandibular glands via cannulation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed to detect hBD-2 expression in glands or in saliva. Candida albicans 613p was inoculated orally into SCID mice to establish oral candidiasis. Whilst expression of hBD-2 was detected in mouse salivary glands by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry 1 day or 1 week following delivery of lentivirus, hBD-2 was not detected in saliva. There was recoverable C. albicans from the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract 4 days to 4 weeks after infection, but there was no establishment of observable oral candidiasis in SCID mice under a stereomicroscope. Our data indicate that lentiviral vectors transduce mouse salivary glands, but not at a sufficient level to allow hBD-2 detection in saliva. Other vectors for gene transduction and additional treatment of SCID mice to establish oral candidiasis are needed in order to utilise mouse salivary glands to test antimicrobial gene therapy.
doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2006.08.003
PMCID: PMC3285981  PMID: 16963233
hBD-2; Lentiviral vectors; Mouse salivary glands; Candida albicans; SCID mice
7.  An antibacterial from Hypericum acmosepalum inhibits ATP-dependent MurE ligase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis 
In a project to characterise new antibacterial chemotypes from plants, hyperenone A and hypercalin B were isolated from the hexane and chloroform extracts of the aerial parts of Hypericum acmosepalum. The structures of both compounds were characterised by extensive one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and were confirmed by mass spectrometry. Hyperenone A and hypercalin B exhibited antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, with minimum inhibition concentration ranges of 2–128 mg/L and 0.5–128 mg/L, respectively. Hyperenone A also showed growth-inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and Mycobacterium bovis BCG at 75 mg/L and 100 mg/L. Neither hyperenone A nor hypercalin B inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and both were non-toxic to cultured mammalian macrophage cells. Both compounds were tested for their ability to inhibit the ATP-dependent MurE ligase of M. tuberculosis, a crucial enzyme in the cytoplasmic steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Hyperenone A inhibited MurE selectively, whereas hypercalin B did not have any effect on enzyme activity.
doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2011.09.018
PMCID: PMC3657136  PMID: 22079533
Hypericum acmosepalum; Hyperenone A; Hypercalin B; Staphylococcus aureus; Tuberculosis; Peptidoglycan; MurE ligase
8.  Genetic regulation of the ramA locus and its expression in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae 
Tigecycline resistance has been attributed to ramA overexpression and subsequent acrA upregulation. The ramA locus, originally identified in Klebsiella pneumoniae, has homologues in Enterobacter and Salmonella spp. In this study, we identify in silico that the ramR binding site is also present in Citrobacter spp. and that Enterobacter, Citrobacter and Klebsiella spp. share key regulatory elements in the control of the romA–ramA locus. RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) mapping indicated that there are two promoters from which romA–ramA expression can be regulated in K. pneumoniae. Correspondingly, electrophoretic binding studies clearly showed that purified RamA and RamR proteins bind to both of these promoters. Hence, there appear to be two RamR binding sites within the Klebsiella romA–ramA locus. Like MarA, RamA binds the promoter region, implying that it might be subject to autoregulation. We have identified changes within ramR in geographically distinct clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae. Intriguingly, levels of romA and ramA expression were not uniformly affected by changes within the ramR gene, thereby supporting the dual promoter finding. Furthermore, a subset of strains sustained no changes within the ramR gene but which still overexpressed the romA–ramA genes, strongly suggesting that a secondary regulator may control ramA expression.
doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2011.02.012
PMCID: PMC3117140  PMID: 21514798
Klebsiella pneumoniae; romA; ramA; ramR; acrA; Tigecycline
9.  In vitro activity of N-chlorotaurine (NCT) in combination with NH4Cl against Trichomonas vaginalis 
Trichomoniasis, caused by the protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis, is usually treated with metronidazole, however resistance is on the rise. In this study, N-chlorotaurine (NCT), a new endogenous mild active chlorine compound for topical use, killed T. vaginalis in vitro within 15 min of treatment at a concentration of 55 mM (1%), which is well tolerated by human tissue. The activity of NCT was further enhanced by addition of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl). A combination of 5.5 mM (0.1%) NCT plus 19 mM (0.1%) NH4Cl killed 100% of trichomonads within 5 min.
doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2010.09.006
PMCID: PMC3030749  PMID: 21074373
Trichomonas vaginalis; Susceptible; N-Chlorotaurine; Oxidant; In vitro
10.  Comparison of two DNA microarrays for detection of plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance and virulence factor genes in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae 
A DNA microarray was developed to detect plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance (AR) and virulence factor (VF) genes in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae. The array was validated with the following bacterial species: Escherichiacoli (n = 17); Klebsiellapneumoniae (n = 3); Enterobacter spp. (n = 6); Acinetobacter genospecies 3 (n = 1); Acinetobacterbaumannii (n = 1); Pseudomonasaeruginosa (n = 2); and Stenotrophomonasmaltophilia (n = 2). The AR gene profiles of these isolates were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The DNA microarray consisted of 155 and 133 AR and VF gene probes, respectively. Results were compared with the commercially available Identibac AMR-ve Array Tube. Hybridisation results indicated that there was excellent correlation between PCR and array results for AR and VF genes. Genes conferring resistance to each antibiotic class were identified by the DNA array. Unusual resistance genes were also identified, such as blaSHV-5 in a blaOXA-23-positive carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii. The phylogenetic group of each E. coli isolate was verified by the array. These data demonstrate that it is possible to screen simultaneously for all important classes of mobile AR and VF genes in Enterobacteriaceae and non-Enterobacteriaceae whilst also assigning a correct phylogenetic group to E. coli isolates. Therefore, it is feasible to test clinical Gram-negative bacteria for all known AR genes and to provide important information regarding pathogenicity simultaneously.
doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2010.02.011
PMCID: PMC3820026  PMID: 20356716
β-Lactamases; Quinolones; Virulence; Molecular detection
11.  N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide–amphotericin B (HPMA–AmB) copolymer conjugates as antileishmanial agents 
Leishmaniasis is a major health problem in many parts of the world, caused by various species of Leishmania. Amastigotes are the clinically relevant form of the parasite in the human host and reside in the parasitophorous vacuole within macrophages. Polymer–drug conjugates have been used for lysosomotropic drug delivery and have already shown potential in anticancer and antileishmanial chemotherapy. We synthesised N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide–amphotericin B (HPMA–AmB) copolymer conjugates in which the AmB was attached to the polymer through a degradable GlyPheLeuGly linker. Antileishmanial activity was assessed in vitro against intracellular amastigotes in host macrophages [murine peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs), murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) and differentiated THP-1 cells]. The most potent copolymers had 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of 0.03 μg/mL AmB equivalent against Leishmania donovani amastigotes in PEMs and BMMs and an EC50 of 0.57 μg/mL AmB equivalent against L. donovani in THP-1 cells. This activity was comparable with free AmB (EC50 = 0.03–0.07 μg/mL against L. donovani in PEMs and BMMs and 0.24–0.42 μg/mL against amastigotes in THP-1 cells) and Fungizone® (EC50 = 0.04–0.07 μg/mL against amastigotes in PEMs). Conjugates also showed potent in vivo activity with ca. 50% inhibition of parasite burden at 1 mg/kg body weight.
doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2008.10.013
PMCID: PMC2669511  PMID: 19097763
Leishmaniasis; Copolymers; Amphotericin B

Results 1-11 (11)