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1.  Psychological Health in Cancer Survivors 
Seminars in Oncology Nursing  2008;24(3):193-201.
Objectives
The prevalence of both negative (distress) and positive responses (growth, well-being) to the cancer experience is examined and difficulties in establishing the prevalence of these responses discussed. A conceptual framework for understanding factors associated with psychological health in cancer survivors is presented. Finally, strategies for promoting psychological health in cancer survivors are examined.
Data Sources
Review of the literature.
Conclusions
Psychological health in cancer survivors is defined by the presence or absence of distress as well as the presence or absence of positive well-being and psychological growth. Furthermore, psychological health in cancer survivors is determined by the balance between two classes of factors: the stress and burden posed by the cancer experience and the resources available for coping with this stress and burden.
Implications for nursing practice
In general, promotion of psychological health is based upon the prevention or treatment of distress as well as the encouragement of growth and well-being. Periodic screening for psychological distress across the cancer trajectory is critical to appropriate management of distress.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2008.05.007
PMCID: PMC3321244  PMID: 18687265
2.  Methodological Issues in Exercise Intervention Research in Oncology 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2007;23(4):297-304.
Objectives
To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that offered exercise interventions for adults diagnosed and treated for cancer related to design, sample, type of intervention and outcomes.
Data sources
Several electronic data-bases were searched and recent review papers were scanned to identify relevant publications.
Conclusion
Exercise adoption seems clearly feasible for early-stage cancer patients, particularly breast cancer patients. Data support positive effects for physical functioning, quality of life (QOL), and psychological well-being. Effects for patients with later-stage disease and other cancers are less clear. The impact of exercise adoption on biomarkers of disease status, immune functioning and hormone levels should also be examined.
Implications for nursing practice
There are many opportunities for nurses to promote exercise in clinical care and in a research context.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2007.08.006
PMCID: PMC2180155  PMID: 18022057

Results 1-2 (2)