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1.  Targeting communication interventions to decrease oncology family caregiver burden 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2012;28(4):262-270.
Objectives
The goal of this paper was to articulate and describe family communication patterns that give shape to four types of family caregivers: Manager, Carrier, Partner, and Loner.
Data Sources
Case studies of oncology family caregivers and hospice patients were selected from data collected as part of a larger, randomized controlled trial aimed at assessing family participation in interdisciplinary team meetings.
Conclusion
Each caregiver type demonstrates essential communication traits with nurses and team members; an ability to recognize these caregiver types will facilitate targeted interventions to decrease family oncology caregiver burden.
Implications for Nursing Practice
By becoming familiar with caregiver types, oncology nurses will be better able to address family oncology caregiver burden and the conflicts arising from family communication challenges. With an understanding of family communication patterns and its impact on caregiver burden, nurses can aid patient, family, and team to best optimize all quality of life domains for patient as well as the lead family caregiver.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2012.09.009
PMCID: PMC3489276  PMID: 23107184
2.  Technologies to Support End of Life Care 
Seminars in oncology nursing  2011;27(3):211-217.
Objectives
To describe the current level of utilization of informatics systems in hospice and palliative care and to discuss two projects that highlight the role of informatics applications for hospice informal caregivers.
Data sources
Published articles, web resources, clinical practice and ongoing research initiatives.
Conclusion
There are currently few informatics interventions designed specifically for palliative and hospice care. Challenges such as interoperability, user acceptance, privacy, the digital divide and allocation of resources all affect the diffusion of informatics tools in hospice.
Implications for nursing practice
Caregiver support through use of IT is feasible and may enhance hospice care.
doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2011.04.006
PMCID: PMC3143374  PMID: 21783012
informatics; hospice; palliative care; information technology; Internet

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