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1.  INFECTIONS IN RECIPIENTS OF LIVER HOMOGRAFTS* 
The New England journal of medicine  1968;279(12):619-626.
Seventeen patients received liver homografts between 1963 and May, 1968. The eight treated before July, 1967, died within 34 days; seven had progressive infections with gram-negative bacilli, Candida albicans and cytomegalovirus. The infections were similar to but more fulminating than those after renal homotransplantation.
In nine later cases, there was more discriminating donor selection, improved immunosuppression, and better organ preservation. In the first five of these nine patients, all infants, lobar hepatic gangrene apparently secondary to delayed right hepatic arterial thrombosis developed. Two died within a few days, two and three and a half months after transplantation. The three who did not die immediately subsequently had multiple bacteremias, fungemias and cytomegalovirus pulmonary infections. One of these children is alive twelve months after transplantation; the others died after four and a half and six months. In contrast, the last four patients, in whom septic liver infarctions were avoided, have been free of serious infections for two to five and a half months.
PMCID: PMC2772060  PMID: 4299208
2.  SHWARTZMAN REACTION AFTER HUMAN RENAL HOMOTRANSPLANTATION* 
The New England journal of medicine  1968;278(12):642-648.
In three human recipients, five renal homografts were destroyed within a few minutes to hours after their revascularization in the new host. The kidneys, removed one to 54 days later, had cortical necrosis. The major vessels were patent, but the arterioles and glomeruli were the site of fibrin deposition. There was little or no fixation of host immunoglobulins in the homografts. The findings were characteristic of a generalized Shwartzman reaction.
Although the cause (or causes) of the Shwartzman reaction in our patients is not known, they may have been conditioned by the bacterial contamination and hemolysis that often attend hemodialysis, by immunosuppression and by the transplantation itself. Some of the patients have preformed lymphocytotoxic antibodies. Thus, certain patients may be predisposed. High-risk patients should be recognized and treated prophylactically with anticoagulants.
PMCID: PMC2765870  PMID: 4866352

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