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1.  Medical Progress 
The New England journal of medicine  1989;321(15):1014-1022.
Advances in the management of both chronic and acute hepatic disease have been made possible and even mandated by the development of liver transplantation. The clinical use of transplantation has proceeded at a rapid pace since a Consensus Development Conference of the National Institutes of Health concluded in June 1983 that liver transplantation had become a service and not simply an experimental procedure.1
The liver can be transplanted as an extra (auxiliary) organ at an ectopic site, or in the orthotopic location after the removal of the host liver (Fig. 1). This article will focus primarily on the orthotopic procedure. However, there has been renewed interest in the auxiliary operation, which will be discussed separately.
doi:10.1056/NEJM198910123211505
PMCID: PMC3091023  PMID: 2674716
2.  CHIMERISM AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION FOR TYPE IV GLYCOGEN STORAGE DISEASE AND TYPE 1 GAUCHER’S DISEASE 
The New England journal of medicine  1993;328(11):745-749.
Background
Liver transplantation for type IV glycogen storage disease (branching-enzyme deficiency) results in the resorption of extrahepatic deposits of amylopectin, but the mechanism of resorption is not known.
Methods
We studied two patients with type IV glycogen storage disease 37 and 91 months after liver transplantation and a third patient with lysosomal glucocerebrosidase deficiency (type 1 Gaucher’s disease), in whom tissue glucocerebroside deposition had decreased 26 months after liver replacement, to determine whether the migration of cells from the allograft (microchimerism) could explain the improved metabolism of enzyme-deficient tissues in the recipient. Samples of blood and biopsy specimens of the skin, lymph nodes, heart, bone marrow, or intestine were examined immunocytochemically with the use of donor-specific monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies and the polymerase chain reaction, with preliminary amplification specific to donor alleles of the gene for the beta chain of HLA-DR molecules, followed by hybridization with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes.
Results
Histopathological examination revealed that the cardiac deposits of amylopectin in the patients with glycogen storage disease and the lymph-node deposits of glucocerebroside in the patient with Gaucher’s disease were dramatically reduced after transplantation. Immunocytochemical analysis showed cells containing the HLA phenotypes of the donor in the heart and skin of the patients with glycogen storage disease and in the lymph nodes, but not the skin, of the patient with Gaucher’s disease. Polymerase-chain-reaction analysis demonstrated donor HLA-DR DNA in the heart of both patients with glycogen storage disease, in the skin of one of them, and in the skin, intestine, blood, and bone marrow of the patient with Gaucher’s disease.
Conclusions
Systemic microchimerism occurs after liver allotransplantation and can ameliorate pancellular enzyme deficiencies.
doi:10.1056/NEJM199303183281101
PMCID: PMC2963442  PMID: 8437594
3.  EXPRESSION OF EPSTEIN–BARR VIRUS–ENCODED SMALL RNA (BY THE EBER-1 GENE) IN LIVER SPECIMENS FROM TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS WITH POST-TRANSPLANTATION LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISEASE 
The New England journal of medicine  1992;327(24):1710-1714.
Background
Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)–associated post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) develops in 1 to 10 percent of transplant recipients, in whom it can be treated by a reduction in the level of immunosuppression. We postulated that the tissue expression of the small RNA transcribed by the EBER-1 gene during latent EBV infection would identify patients at risk for PTLD.
Methods
We studied EBER-1 gene expression in liver specimens obtained from 24 patients 2 days to 22 months before the development of PTLD, using in situ hybridization with an oligonucleotide probe. Control specimens were obtained from 20 recipients of allografts with signs of injury due to organ retrieval, acute graft rejection, or viral hepatitis in whom PTLD had not developed 9 to 71 months after the biopsy.
Results
Of the 24 patients with PTLD, 17 (71 percent) had specimens in which 1 to 40 percent of mononuclear cells were positive for the EBER-1 gene. In addition, 10 of these 17 patients (59 percent) had specimens with histopathological changes suggestive of EBV hepatitis. In every case, EBER-1–positive cells were found within the lymphoproliferative lesions identified at autopsy. Only 2 of the 20 controls (10 percent) had specimens with EBER-1–positive cells (P< 0.001), and such cells were rare.
Conclusions
EBER-1 gene expression in liver tissue precedes the occurrence of clinical and histologic PTLD. The possibility of identifying patients at risk by the method we describe here and preventing the occurrence of PTLD by a timely reduction of immunosuppression needs to be addressed by future prospective studies.
doi:10.1056/NEJM199212103272403
PMCID: PMC2956494  PMID: 1331789

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