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1.  Association of Shorter Leukocyte Telomere Repeat Length with Dementia and Mortality 
Archives of neurology  2012;69(10):1332-1339.
Objective
Shortening of chromosomal telomeres is a consequence of cell division, and is a biological factor related to cellular aging and potentially to more rapid organismal biological aging. We have hypothesized that shorter telomere length, as measured in human blood samples, is associated with the development of Alzheimer disease, and with mortality.
Design/Setting
Using data from a multiethnic community-based study of aging and dementia, we studied 1,983 subjects over age 65 yr, who had available stored leukocyte DNA. Mean age-at-blood-draw was 78.3 ± 6.9 yr. Mean age of death was 86.0 ± 7.4 yr. Median follow-up for mortality was 9.3 yr; 190 (9.6%) developed incident dementia. We used real-time PCR to determine mean telomere length (TL) in a modified telomere-sequence to single-copy-gene-sequence ratio method.
Results
TL was inversely related to age, and shorter in men than women. Persons dying during follow-up had shorter TL compared to survivors (6,218±819 vs. 6,491±881 basepairs, p<0.0001) even after adjustment for age, sex, education, and APOE genotype. Individuals who developed dementia had significantly shorter TL (6,131±798 for prevalent cases, and 6,315±817 for incident cases) compared with those remaining dementia-free (6,431±864). Cox-regression analyses showed that shorter TL was a risk for earlier onset of dementia (p=0.05), but stratified analyses for sex showed that this association of age-at-onset of dementia with shorter TL was significant in women, but not in men.
Conclusions
Our findings suggest that shortened leukocyte TL is associated with risks of dementia and mortality, and may therefore be a marker of biological aging.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2012.1541
PMCID: PMC3622729  PMID: 22825311
biological aging; Alzheimer's disease; apolipoprotein E; leukocyte; DNA
2.  Familial Aggregation of Dementia With Lewy Bodies 
Archives of Neurology  2011;68(1):90-93.
Background
Familial aggregation of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) remains unclear.
Objectives
To determine the degree of family aggregation of DLB by comparing DLB risk between siblings of probands with clinically diagnosed DLB and siblings of probands with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer disease in a cohort of Caribbean Hispanic families and to explore the degree of aggregation of specific clinical manifestations (ie, cognitive fluctuations, visual hallucinations, and parkinsonism) in DLB.
Design
Familial cohort study.
Setting
Academic research.
Patients
We separately compared risks of possible DLB, probable DLB, and clinical core features of DLB (cognitive fluctuations, visual hallucinations, and parkinsonism) between siblings of probands with clinically diagnosed DLB (n=344) and siblings of probands with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer disease (n=280) in 214 Caribbean Hispanic families with extended neurologic and neuropsychological assessment.
Main Outcome Measures
We applied general estimating equations to adjust for clustering within families. In these models, age and proband disease status were independent variables, and disease status of siblings was the measure of disease risk and the dependent variable.
Results
Compared with siblings of probands having clinically diagnosed Alzheimer disease, siblings of probands having clinically diagnosed DLB had higher risks of probable DLB (odds ratio [OR], 2.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–5.04) and visual hallucinations (2.32; 1.16–4.64). They also had increased risks of possible DLB (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 0.97–2.34) and cognitive fluctuations (1.55; 0.95–2.53).
Conclusions
Dementia with Lewy bodies and core features of DLB aggregate in families. Compared with siblings of probands having clinically diagnosed AD, siblings of probands having clinically diagnosed DLB are at increased risks of DLB and visual hallucinations. These findings are an important step in elucidating the genetic risk factors underlying DLB and in delineating DLB from other neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2010.319
PMCID: PMC3268781  PMID: 21220678
3.  Identification of Novel Loci for Alzheimer Disease and Replication of CLU, PICALM, and BIN1 in Caribbean Hispanic Individuals 
Archives of Neurology  2010;68(3):320-328.
Objectives
To identify novel loci for late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) in Caribbean Hispanic individuals and to replicate the findings in a publicly available data set from the National Institute on Aging Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Family Study.
Design
Nested case-control genome-wide association study.
Setting
The Washington Heights–Inwood Columbia Aging Project and the Estudio Familiar de Influencia Genetica de Alzheimer study.
Participants
Five hundred forty-nine affected and 544 unaffected individuals of Caribbean Hispanic ancestry.
Intervention
The Illumina HumanHap 650Y chip for genotyping.
Main Outcome Measure
Clinical diagnosis or pathologically confirmed diagnosis of LOAD.
Results
The strongest support for allelic association was for rs9945493 on 18q23 (P=1.7 × 10−7), but 22 additional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had a P value less than 9 × 10−6 under 3 different analyses: unadjusted and stratified by the presence or absence of the APOE ε4 allele. Of these SNPs, 5 SNPs (rs4669573 and rs10197851 on 2p25.1; rs11711889 on 3q25.2; rs1117750 on 7p21.1; and rs7908652 on 10q23.1) were associated with LOAD in an independent cohort from the National Institute on Aging Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Family Study. We also replicated genetic associations for CLU, PICALM, and BIN1.
Conclusions
Our genome-wide search of Caribbean Hispanic individuals identified several novel genetic variants associated with LOAD and replicated these associations in a white cohort. We also replicated associations in CLU, PICALM, and BIN1 in the Caribbean Hispanic cohort.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2010.292
PMCID: PMC3268783  PMID: 21059989
4.  Meta-analysis of the Association Between Variants in SORL1 and Alzheimer Disease 
Archives of neurology  2011;68(1):99-106.
Objective
To reexamine the association between the neuronal sortilin-related receptor gene (SORL1) and Alzheimer disease (AD).
Design
Comprehensive and unbiased meta-analysis of all published and unpublished data from case-control studies for the SORL1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that had been repeatedly assessed across studies.
Setting
Academic research institutions in the United States, the Netherlands, Canada, Belgium, the United Kingdom, Singapore, Japan, Sweden, Germany, France, and Italy.
Participants
All published white and Asian case-control data sets, which included a total of 12 464 cases and 17 929 controls.
Main Outcome Measures
Alzheimer disease according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) and the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Association (now known as the Alzheimer’s Association).
Results
In the white data sets, several markers were associated with AD after correction for multiple testing, including previously reported SNPs 8, 9, and 10 (P<.001). In addition, the C-G-C haplotype at SNPs 8 through 10 was associated with AD risk (P<.001). In the combined Asian data sets, SNPs 19 and 23 through 25 were associated with AD risk (P<.001). The disease-associated alleles at SNPs 8, 9, and 10 (120 873 131-120 886 175 base pairs [bp]; C-G-C alleles), at SNP 19 (120 953 300 bp; G allele), and at SNPs 24 through 25 (120 988 611 bp; T and C alleles) were the same previously reported alleles. The SNPs 4 through 5, 8 through 10, 12, and 19 through 25 belong to distinct linkage disequilibrium blocks. The same alleles at SNPs 8 through 10 (C-G-C), 19 (G), and 24 and 25 (T and C) have also been associated with AD endophenotypes, including white matter hyperintensities and hippocampal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid measures of amyloid β-peptide 42, and full-length SORL1 expression in the human brain.
Conclusion
This comprehensive meta-analysis provides confirmatory evidence that multiple SORL1 variants in distinct linkage disequilibrium blocks are associated with AD.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2010.346
PMCID: PMC3086666  PMID: 21220680
5.  Analyses of the National Institute on Aging Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Family Study 
Archives of neurology  2008;65(11):1518-1526.
Objective
To identify putative genetic loci related to the risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD).
Design
Linkage analysis and family-based and case-control association analyses from a genomewide scan using approximately 6000 single-nucleotide polymorphic markers at an average intermarker distance of 0.65 cM.
Setting
The National Institute on Aging Genetics Initiative for Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease (NIA-LOAD) was created to expand the resources for studies to identify additional genes contributing to the risk for LOAD.
Participants
We investigated 1902 individuals from 328 families with LOAD and 236 unrelated control subjects.
Main Outcome Measures
Clinical diagnosis of LOAD.
Results
The strongest overall finding was at chromosome 19q13.32, confirming the effect of the apolipoprotein E gene on LOAD risk in the family-based and case-control analyses. However, single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the following loci were also statistically significant in 1 or more of the analyses performed: 7p22.2, 7p21.3, and 16q21 in the linkage analyses; 17q21.31 and 22q11.21 in the family-based association analysis; and 7q31.1 and 22q12.3 in the case-control analysis. Positive associations at 7q31.1 and 20q13.33 were also significant in the meta-analysis results in a publicly available database.
Conclusions
Several additional loci may harbor genetic variants associated with LOAD. This data set provides a wealth of phenotypic and genotypic information for use as a resource in discovery and confirmatory research.
doi:10.1001/archneur.65.11.1518
PMCID: PMC2694670  PMID: 19001172
6.  The Association Between Genetic Variants in SORL1 and Alzheimer’s Disease in an Urban, Multiethnic, Community-Based Cohort 
Archives of neurology  2007;64(4):501-506.
Context
Variants in 3′ and 5′ regions of SORL1, the neuronal sorting protein-related receptor, were recently found to be associated with late onset familial and sporadic Alzheimer’s disease in several datasets that were selected for familial aggregation or were ethnically diverse or clinic-based selected series.
Objective
To investigate the association between Alzheimer’s disease and variant alleles in SORL1 using a series of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in an urban, multiethnic community-based population.
Design & Setting
We used a nested case-control analysis in a population-based, prospective study of aging and dementia in Medicare recipients, 65 years and older, residing in northern Manhattan.
Participants
There were 296 patients with probable Alzheimer’s disease and 428 healthy elderly controls. The participants were of African American (34%), Caribbean Hispanic (51%) or non-Hispanic whites (15%).
Main Outcome Measures
We genotyped all 29 SNPs in SORL1 that were examined in the earlier report. We assessed allelic association with AD using standard case-control methods which included APOE genotype as a covariate.
Results
Several individual SNPs and SNP haplotypes were significantly associated with AD in this prospectively collected community-based cohort, confirming the previously reported positive association of SORL1 with Alzheimer’s disease. SNP 12 near the 5′ region was associated with AD in African-Americans and Hispanics. Two SNPs in the 3′ region were also associated with AD in African-Americans (SNP 26) and Whites (SNP 20). A single haplotype in the 3′ region was associated with AD in Hispanics. However, several different haplotypes were associated with AD in the African-Americans and Whites, including the “TTC” haplotypes at SNPs 23–25 (p=0.035) that was significantly associated with AD in the North European Whites in the previous report.
Conclusions
This study confirms the association between genetic variants in SORL1 and AD. While the associations observed in these datasets overlap with those previously reported, the finding of novel SNP and haplotype associations suggest that there may be extensive allelic heterogeneity in SORL1. Broad regions of the SORL1 gene will therefore need to be scrutinized for functional pathogenic variants.
doi:10.1001/archneur.64.4.501
PMCID: PMC2639214  PMID: 17420311
SORL1; Alzheimer’s disease; sporadic; African American; Caribbean Hispanic
7.  Comparison of Clinical Manifestation in Familial Alzheimer's disease and Dementia with Lewy Bodies 
Archives of neurology  2008;65(12):1634-1639.
Background
The clinical delineation of Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains unclear.
Objective
To compare the neuropsychological profiles of patients with clinically diagnosed Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Methods
We first compared measures of memory, orientation, language, executive, visual perception and visual construction function between persons with DLB and AD in two Caribbean Hispanic cohorts, including a family dataset (DLB =89; AD: n=118) and an epidemiologic dataset (DLB: n=70; AD: n=157). DLB in the family sample was further divided into i) families with two or more affected family members (DLB), or ii) one affected family member (DLB). To determine whether observed differences in cognitive profiles were driven by heritable factors, we then repeated the analyses in the epidemiologic cohort excluding all familial cases. We applied general linear models adjusting for age, sex, education, disease duration, and APOE-ε4 genotype.
Results
Persons with DLB were in both cohorts more severely impaired in orientation, visual construction and non verbal reasoning after controlling for potential confounders. Persons with 2 or more DLB cases per family had the most severe impairment in episodic and semantic memory, followed by those with one DLB case per family, then by those with AD. When familial AD and DLB cases were excluded from the analysis in the epidemiologic cohort, the differences between the AD and DLB groups persisted but were attenuated.
Conclusions
Compared to persons with AD, persons with DLB are more severely impaired in various cognitive domains, particularly orientation, visual perception and visual construction. The difference appears strong in familial rather than sporadic DLB. Whether this divergence in cognitive functions is caused by gene-gene or gene-environmental interactions remains unclear.
doi:10.1001/archneur.65.12.1634
PMCID: PMC2633487  PMID: 19064751
8.  Are Generalized and Localization-Related Epilepsies Genetically Distinct? 
Archives of neurology  1998;55(3):339-344.
Background
Whether the genetic influences are distinct for generalized and localization-related epilepsies or whether some susceptibility genes raise the risk for both types of epilepsy is uncertain.
Objective
To evaluate genetic heterogeneity in epilepsy.
Methods
We used Cox proportional hazards analysis to compute rate ratios (RRs) for generalized and localization-related idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy in the first-degree relatives of 1498 adult probands with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy ascertained from voluntary organizations. The reference group comprised the first-degree relatives of 362 probands from the same study with postnatal symptomatic epilepsy in whom the genetic contributions appear to be minimal.
Results
In the parents and siblings, the risk for all idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy was greater if the proband’s epilepsy was generalized than if it was localization-related (RR, 4.7 vs 2.4). However, in the parents and siblings of each group of probands, the in creased risk was not restricted to the same type of epilepsy as in the proband. The results differed in offspring, with a greater risk for all types of epilepsy if the proband’s epilepsy was localization-related than if it was generalized (RR, 4.2 vs 1.6) and a greater risk for localization-related epilepsy than for generalized epilepsy (RR, 7.8 vs 1.8) if the proband’s epilepsy was localization-related.
Conclusions
These findings in parents and siblings suggest that some susceptibility genotypes raise the risk for both generalized and localization-related epilepsies but are more common in persons affected with generalized epilepsy. The different findings in offspring may reflect a different influence on susceptibility in that subgroup.
PMCID: PMC1626267  PMID: 9520007

Results 1-8 (8)