PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-5 (5)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Genotype harmonizer: automatic strand alignment and format conversion for genotype data integration 
BMC Research Notes  2014;7(1):901.
Background
To gain statistical power or to allow fine mapping, researchers typically want to pool data before meta-analyses or genotype imputation. However, the necessary harmonization of genetic datasets is currently error-prone because of many different file formats and lack of clarity about which genomic strand is used as reference.
Findings
Genotype Harmonizer (GH) is a command-line tool to harmonize genetic datasets by automatically solving issues concerning genomic strand and file format. GH solves the unknown strand issue by aligning ambiguous A/T and G/C SNPs to a specified reference, using linkage disequilibrium patterns without prior knowledge of the used strands. GH supports many common GWAS/NGS genotype formats including PLINK, binary PLINK, VCF, SHAPEIT2 & Oxford GEN. GH is implemented in Java and a large part of the functionality can also be used as Java ‘Genotype-IO’ API. All software is open source under license LGPLv3 and available from http://www.molgenis.org/systemsgenetics.
Conclusions
GH can be used to harmonize genetic datasets across different file formats and can be easily integrated as a step in routine meta-analysis and imputation pipelines.
doi:10.1186/1756-0500-7-901
PMCID: PMC4307387  PMID: 25495213
GWAS; Imputation; Meta-analysis; Linkage disequilibrium
2.  WormQTLHD—a web database for linking human disease to natural variation data in C. elegans 
Nucleic Acids Research  2013;42(Database issue):D794-D801.
Interactions between proteins are highly conserved across species. As a result, the molecular basis of multiple diseases affecting humans can be studied in model organisms that offer many alternative experimental opportunities. One such organism—Caenorhabditis elegans—has been used to produce much molecular quantitative genetics and systems biology data over the past decade. We present WormQTLHD (Human Disease), a database that quantitatively and systematically links expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) findings in C. elegans to gene–disease associations in man. WormQTLHD, available online at http://www.wormqtl-hd.org, is a user-friendly set of tools to reveal functionally coherent, evolutionary conserved gene networks. These can be used to predict novel gene-to-gene associations and the functions of genes underlying the disease of interest. We created a new database that links C. elegans eQTL data sets to human diseases (34 337 gene–disease associations from OMIM, DGA, GWAS Central and NHGRI GWAS Catalogue) based on overlapping sets of orthologous genes associated to phenotypes in these two species. We utilized QTL results, high-throughput molecular phenotypes, classical phenotypes and genotype data covering different developmental stages and environments from WormQTL database. All software is available as open source, built on MOLGENIS and xQTL workbench.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkt1044
PMCID: PMC3965109  PMID: 24217915
3.  WormQTL—public archive and analysis web portal for natural variation data in Caenorhabditis spp 
Nucleic Acids Research  2012;41(Database issue):D738-D743.
Here, we present WormQTL (http://www.wormqtl.org), an easily accessible database enabling search, comparative analysis and meta-analysis of all data on variation in Caenorhabditis spp. Over the past decade, Caenorhabditis elegans has become instrumental for molecular quantitative genetics and the systems biology of natural variation. These efforts have resulted in a valuable amount of phenotypic, high-throughput molecular and genotypic data across different developmental worm stages and environments in hundreds of C. elegans strains. WormQTL provides a workbench of analysis tools for genotype–phenotype linkage and association mapping based on but not limited to R/qtl (http://www.rqtl.org). All data can be uploaded and downloaded using simple delimited text or Excel formats and are accessible via a public web user interface for biologists and R statistic and web service interfaces for bioinformaticians, based on open source MOLGENIS and xQTL workbench software. WormQTL welcomes data submissions from other worm researchers.
doi:10.1093/nar/gks1124
PMCID: PMC3531126  PMID: 23180786
4.  xQTL workbench: a scalable web environment for multi-level QTL analysis 
Bioinformatics  2012;28(7):1042-1044.
Summary: xQTL workbench is a scalable web platform for the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) at multiple levels: for example gene expression (eQTL), protein abundance (pQTL), metabolite abundance (mQTL) and phenotype (phQTL) data. Popular QTL mapping methods for model organism and human populations are accessible via the web user interface. Large calculations scale easily on to multi-core computers, clusters and Cloud. All data involved can be uploaded and queried online: markers, genotypes, microarrays, NGS, LC-MS, GC-MS, NMR, etc. When new data types come available, xQTL workbench is quickly customized using the Molgenis software generator.
Availability: xQTL workbench runs on all common platforms, including Linux, Mac OS X and Windows. An online demo system, installation guide, tutorials, software and source code are available under the LGPL3 license from http://www.xqtl.org.
Contact: m.a.swertz@rug.nl
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/bts049
PMCID: PMC3315722  PMID: 22308096
5.  Bioinformatics tools and database resources for systems genetics analysis in mice—a short review and an evaluation of future needs 
Briefings in Bioinformatics  2011;13(2):135-142.
During a meeting of the SYSGENET working group ‘Bioinformatics’, currently available software tools and databases for systems genetics in mice were reviewed and the needs for future developments discussed. The group evaluated interoperability and performed initial feasibility studies. To aid future compatibility of software and exchange of already developed software modules, a strong recommendation was made by the group to integrate HAPPY and R/qtl analysis toolboxes, GeneNetwork and XGAP database platforms, and TIQS and xQTL processing platforms. R should be used as the principal computer language for QTL data analysis in all platforms and a ‘cloud’ should be used for software dissemination to the community. Furthermore, the working group recommended that all data models and software source code should be made visible in public repositories to allow a coordinated effort on the use of common data structures and file formats.
doi:10.1093/bib/bbr026
PMCID: PMC3294237  PMID: 22396485
QTL mapping; database; mouse; systems genetics

Results 1-5 (5)