PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Glucose Restriction Inhibits Skeletal Myoblast Differentiation by Activating SIRT1 through AMPK-Mediated Regulation of Nampt 
Developmental cell  2008;14(5):661-673.
SUMMARY
It is intuitive to speculate that nutrient availability may influence differentiation of mammalian cells. Nonetheless, a comprehensive complement of the molecular determinants involved in this process has not been elucidated yet. Here, we have investigated how nutrients (glucose) affect skeletal myogenesis. Glucose restriction (GR) impaired differentiation of skeletal myoblasts and was associated with activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activated AMPK was required to promote GR-induced transcription of the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme Nampt. Indeed, GR augmented the Nampt activity, which consequently modified the intracellular [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio and nicotinamide levels, and mediated inhibition of skeletal myogenesis. Skeletal myoblasts derived from SIRT1+/− heterozygous mice were resistant to the effects of either GR or AMPK activation. These experiments reveal that AMPK, Nampt, and SIRT1 are the molecular components of a functional signaling pathway that allows skeletal muscle cells to sense and react to nutrient availability.
doi:10.1016/j.devcel.2008.02.004
PMCID: PMC2431467  PMID: 18477450
2.  The PEPR GeneChip data warehouse, and implementation of a dynamic time series query tool (SGQT) with graphical interface 
Nucleic Acids Research  2004;32(Database issue):D578-D581.
Publicly accessible DNA databases (genome browsers) are rapidly accelerating post-genomic research (see http://www.genome.ucsc.edu/), with integrated genomic DNA, gene structure, EST/ splicing and cross-species ortholog data. DNA databases have relatively low dimensionality; the genome is a linear code that anchors all associated data. In contrast, RNA expression and protein databases need to be able to handle very high dimensional data, with time, tissue, cell type and genes, as interrelated variables. The high dimensionality of microarray expression profile data, and the lack of a standard experimental platform have complicated the development of web-accessible databases and analytical tools. We have designed and implemented a public resource of expression profile data containing 1024 human, mouse and rat Affymetrix GeneChip expression profiles, generated in the same laboratory, and subject to the same quality and procedural controls (Public Expression Profiling Resource; PEPR). Our Oracle-based PEPR data warehouse includes a novel time series query analysis tool (SGQT), enabling dynamic generation of graphs and spreadsheets showing the action of any transcript of interest over time. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of this tool using a 27 time point, in vivo muscle regeneration series. This data warehouse and associated analysis tools provides access to multidimensional microarray data through web-based interfaces, both for download of all types of raw data for independent analysis, and also for straightforward gene-based queries. Planned implementations of PEPR will include web-based remote entry of projects adhering to quality control and standard operating procedure (QC/SOP) criteria, and automated output of alternative probe set algorithms for each project (see http://microarray.cnmcresearch.org/pgadatatable.asp).
doi:10.1093/nar/gkh003
PMCID: PMC308738  PMID: 14681485
3.  Expression Profiling in the Muscular Dystrophies 
The Journal of Cell Biology  2000;151(6):1321-1336.
We used expression profiling to define the pathophysiological cascades involved in the progression of two muscular dystrophies with known primary biochemical defects, dystrophin deficiency (Duchenne muscular dystrophy) and α-sarcoglycan deficiency (a dystrophin-associated protein). We employed a novel protocol for expression profiling in human tissues using mixed samples of multiple patients and iterative comparisons of duplicate datasets. We found evidence for both incomplete differentiation of patient muscle, and for dedifferentiation of myofibers to alternative lineages with advancing age. One developmentally regulated gene characterized in detail, α-cardiac actin, showed abnormal persistent expression after birth in 60% of Duchenne dystrophy myofibers. The majority of myofibers (∼80%) remained strongly positive for this protein throughout the course of the disease. Other developmentally regulated genes that showed widespread overexpression in these muscular dystrophies included embryonic myosin heavy chain, versican, acetylcholine receptor α-1, secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine/osteonectin, and thrombospondin 4. We hypothesize that the abnormal Ca2+ influx in dystrophin- and α-sarcoglycan–deficient myofibers leads to altered developmental programming of developing and regenerating myofibers. The finding of upregulation of HLA-DR and factor XIIIa led to the novel identification of activated dendritic cell infiltration in dystrophic muscle; these cells mediate immune responses and likely induce microenvironmental changes in muscle. We also document a general metabolic crisis in dystrophic muscle, with large scale downregulation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene expression. Finally, our expression profiling results show that primary genetic defects can be identified by a reduction in the corresponding RNA.
PMCID: PMC2190600  PMID: 11121445
muscular dystrophy; microarray; dystrophin; α-sarcoglycan; expression profiling

Results 1-3 (3)