PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Steady-State Equilibrium Phase Inversion Recovery ON-resonant Water Suppression (IRON) Magnetic Resonance Angiography in Conjunction with Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles. A Robust Technique for Imaging within a Wide Range of Contrast Agent Dosages 
Objectives
To investigate the ability of inversion recovery ON-resonant water suppression (IRON) in conjunction with P904 (superparamagnetic nanoparticles which consisting of a maghemite core coated with a low-molecular-weight amino-alcohol derivative of glucose) to perform steady-state equilibrium phase magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) over a wide dose range.
Materials and Methods
Experiments were approved by the institutional animal care committee. Rabbits (n=12) were imaged at baseline and serially after the administration of 10 incremental dosages of 0.57–5.7 mgFe/Kg P904. Conventional T1-weighted and IRON MRA were obtained on a clinical 1.5-T scanner to image the thoracic and abdominal aorta, and peripheral vessels. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and vessel sharpness were quantified.
Results
Using IRON MRA, CNR and vessel sharpness progressively increased with incremental dosages of the contrast agent P904, exhibiting constantly higher contrast values than T1-weighted MRA over a very wide range of contrast agent doses (CNR of 18.8±5.6 for IRON versus 11.1±2.8 for T1-weighted MRA at 1.71 mgFe/kg, p=0.02 and 19.8±5.9 for IRON versus −0.8±1.4 for T1-weighted MRA at 3.99 mgFe/kg, p=0.0002). Similar results were obtained for vessel sharpness in peripheral vessels, (Vessel sharpness of 46.76±6.48% for IRON versus 33.20±3.53% for T1-weighted MRA at 1.71 mgFe/Kg, p=0.002, and of 48.66±5.50% for IRON versus 19.00±7.41% for T1-weighted MRA at 3.99 mgFe/Kg, p=0.003).
Conclusion
Our study suggests that quantitative CNR and vessel sharpness after the injection of P904 are consistently higher for IRON MRA when compared to conventional T1-weighted MRA. These findings apply for a wide range of contrast agent dosages.
doi:10.1002/jmri.24043
PMCID: PMC3657577  PMID: 23418107
2.  Direct in vitro comparison of six 3D positive contrast methods for susceptibility marker imaging 
Purpose
To compare different techniques for positive contrast imaging of susceptibility markers with MRI for 3D visualization. As several different techniques have been reported, the choice of the suitable method depends on its properties with regard to the amount of positive contrast and the desired background suppression, as well as other imaging constraints needed for a specific application.
Materials and methods
Six different positive contrast techniques are investigated for their ability to image at 3T a single susceptibility marker in vitro. The white marker method (WM), susceptibility gradient mapping (SGM), inversion recovery with on-resonant water suppression (IRON), frequency selective excitation (FSX), fast low flip-angle positive contrast SSFP (FLAPS), and iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation (IDEAL) were implemented and investigated.
Results
The different methods were compared with respect to the volume of positive contrast, the product of volume and signal intensity, imaging time, and the level of background suppression. Quantitative results are provided and strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches are discussed.
Conclusion
The appropriate choice of positive contrast imaging technique depends on the desired level of background suppression, acquisition speed, and robustness against artifacts, for which in vitro comparative data is now available.
doi:10.1002/jmri.23976
PMCID: PMC3620818  PMID: 23281151
susceptibility imaging; off resonance; positive contrast
3.  Practical Signal-to-Noise Ratio Quantification for Sensitivity Encoding: Application to Coronary MRA 
Purpose
To develop and evaluate a practical method for the quantification of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on coronary magnetic resonance angiograms (MRA) acquired with parallel imaging.
Materials and Methods
To quantify the spatially varying noise due to parallel imaging reconstruction, a new method has been implemented incorporating image data acquisition followed by a fast noise scan during which radiofrequency pulses, cardiac triggering and navigator gating are disabled. The performance of this method was evaluated in a phantom study where SNR measurements were compared to those of a reference standard (multiple repetitions). Subsequently, SNR of myocardium and posterior skeletal muscle was determined on in vivo human coronary MRA.
Results
In a phantom, the SNR measured using the proposed method deviated less than 10.1% from the reference method for small geometry factors (<=2). In-vivo, the noise scan for a 10 minutes coronary MRA acquisition was acquired in 30s. Higher signal and lower SNR, due to spatially varying noise, were found in myocardium compared to posterior skeletal muscle.
Conclusion
SNR quantification based on a fast noise scan is a validated and easy-to-use method when applied to 3D coronary MRA obtained with parallel imaging as long as the geometry factor remains low.
doi:10.1002/jmri.22571
PMCID: PMC3098458  PMID: 21591001
SNR measurement; parallel imaging; coronary MRA; phased array coils; image noise

Results 1-3 (3)