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1.  In vitro and In vivo Release of Nerve Growth Factor from Biodegradable Poly-Lactic-Co-Glycolic-Acid Microspheres 
Regeneration of peripheral nerves after injury is suboptimal. We now report the long term delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF) by biodegradable poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres in vitro and in vivo. Lactic to glycolic acid ratios of 50:50 and 85:15 were fabricated using the double emulsion solvent, evaporation technique. Three different inherent viscosities (0.1dL/g: 1A, 0.4dL/g: 4A, 0.7dL/g: 7A) were analyzed. In vitro, release of NGF for 23 days was measured. Electron microscopy demonstrated intact spheres for at least 7 days (50:50 1A), 14 days (50:50 4A) or 35 days (50:50 7A and 85:15 7A). In vitro release kinetics were characterized by burst release, followed by release of NGF at a rate of 0.6%-1.6% a day. Release curves for 50:50 1A and 85:15 7A differed significantly from other compositions (p<0.01). In vivo, release was characterized by a novel radionuclide tracking assay. Release rates varied from 0.9%-2.2% per day with linear kinetics. All but the 85:15 type of spheres showed different release profiles in vivo compared to in vitro conditions. Based on the surface morphology and release profiles we found microspheres fabricated from 50:50 4A PLGA to be best suited for the use in a rat sciatic nerve injury model.
doi:10.1002/jbm.a.32900
PMCID: PMC2989534  PMID: 20878933
Nerve Growth Factor; Microspheres; Peripheral Nerve; Poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid; Dorsal root ganglia
2.  In Vivo Biodegradation and Biocompatibility of PEG/Sebacic Acid-Based Hydrogels using a Cage Implant System 
Comprehensive in vivo biodegradability and biocompatibility of unmodified and Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide-modified PEG/Sebacic acid based hydrogels were evaluated and compared to the control material poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) using a cage implantation system, as well as direct subcutaneous implantation for up to 12 weeks. The total weight loss after 12 weeks of implantation for unmodified PEGSDA and RGD-modified PEGSDA in the cage was approximately 42% and 52%, respectively, with no statistical difference (p> 0.05). The exudate analysis showed that PEGSDA hydrogels induced minimal inflammatory response up to 21 days following implantation, similar to the controls (empty cage and the cage containing PLGA discs). Histology analysis from direct subcutaneous implantation of the hydrogels and PLGA scaffold showed statistically similar resolution of the acute and chronic inflammatory responses with development of the fibrous capsule between the PEGSDA hydrogels and the control (PLGA). The cage system, as well as the histology analysis, demonstrated that the degradation products of both hydrogels, with or without RGD peptide modification, are biocompatible without statistically significant differences in the inflammatory responses, as compared to PLGA.
doi:10.1002/jbm.a.32810
PMCID: PMC2928850  PMID: 20574982
In vivo biocompatibility; In vivo biodegradation; PEG sebacic acid diacrylate; Hydrogel; RGD-modified hydrogel; Cage implantation
3.  Collagen type I hydrogel allows migration, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow stromal cells 
Hydrogels are potentially useful for many purposes in regenerative medicine including drug and growth factor delivery, as single scaffold for bone repair or as a filler of pores of another biomaterial in which host mesenchymal progenitor cells can migrate in and differentiate into matrix-producing osteoblasts. Collagen type I is of special interest as it is a very important and abundant natural matrix component. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether rat bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) are able to adhere to, to survive, to proliferate and to migrate in collagen type I hydrogels and whether they can adopt an osteoblastic fate. rBMSCs were obtained from rat femora and plated on collagen type I hydrogels. Prior to harvest by day 7, 14, and 21, hydrogels were fluorescently labeled, cryo-cut and analyzed by fluorescent-based and laser scanning confocal microscopy to determine cell proliferation, migration, and viability. Osteogenic differentiation was determined by alkaline phosphatase activity. Collagen type I hydrogels allowed the attachment of rBMSCs to the hydrogel, their proliferation, and migration towards the inner part of the gel. rBMSCs started to differentiate into osteoblasts as determined by an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity after two weeks in culture. This study therefore suggests that collagen type I hydrogels could be useful for musculoskeletal regenerative therapies.
doi:10.1002/jbm.a.32696
PMCID: PMC2891839  PMID: 20186733
Collagen type I hydrogel; bone marrow stromal cells; cell migration; osteogenic differentiation; bone regeneration
4.  Development of Biodegradable and Injectable Macromers Based on Poly(Ethylene Glycol) and Diacid Monomers 
Novel biodegradable injectable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based macromers were synthesized by reacting low molecular weight PEG (MW: 200) and dicarboxylic acids such as sebacic acid or terephthalic acid. Chemical structures of the resulting polymers were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy characterizations. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that these polymers were completely amorphous above room temperature. After photopolymerization, dynamic elastic shear modulus of the crosslinked polymers was up to 1.5 MPa and compressive modulus was up to 2.2 MPa depending on the polymer composition. The in vitro degradation study showed that mass losses of these polymers were gradually decreased over 23 weeks of period in simulated body fluid. By incorporating up to 30 wt% of 2-hydroxyethyl methylmethacrylate (HEMA) into the crosslinking network, the dynamic elastic modulus and compressive modulus was significantly increased up to 7.2 MPa and 3.2 MPa, respectively. HEMA incorporation also accelerated degradation as indicated by significantly higher mass loss of up to 27% after 20 weeks of incubation. Cytocompatability studies using osteoblasts and neural cells revealed that cell metabolic activity on these polymers with or without HEMA was close to the control tissue culture polystyrene. The PEG based macromers developed in this study may be useful as scaffolds or cell carriers for tissue engineering applications.
doi:10.1002/jbm.a.32166
PMCID: PMC2857720  PMID: 18655146
Polyethylene glycol; dicarboxylic acid; HEMA; tissue engineering; biodegradation

Results 1-4 (4)