PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-5 (5)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Learning curve for hand-assisted laparoscopic D2 radical gastrectomy 
AIM: To describe the learning curves of hand-assisted laparoscopic D2 radical gastrectomy (HALG) for the treatment of gastric cancer.
METHODS: The HALG surgical procedure consists of three stages: surgery under direct vision via the port for hand assistance, hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery, and gastrointestinal tract reconstruction. According to the order of the date of surgery, patients were divided into 6 groups (A-F) with 20 cases in each group. All surgeries were performed by the same group of surgeons. We performed a comprehensive and in-depth retrospective comparative analysis of the clinical data of all patients, with the clinical data including general patient information and intraoperative and postoperative observation indicators.
RESULTS: There were no differences in the basic information among the patient groups (P > 0.05). The operative time of the hand-assisted surgery stage in group A was 8-10 min longer than the other groups, with the difference being statistically significant (P = 0.01). There were no differences in total operative time between the groups (P = 0.30). Postoperative intestinal function recovery time in group A was longer than that of other groups (P = 0.02). Lengths of hospital stay and surgical quality indicators (such as intraoperative blood loss, numbers of detected lymph nodes, intraoperative side injury, postoperative complications, reoperation rate, and readmission rate 30 d after surgery) were not significantly different among the groups.
CONCLUSION: HALG is a surgical procedure that can be easily mastered, with a learning curve closely related to the operative time of the hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery stage.
doi:10.3748/wjg.v21.i5.1606
PMCID: PMC4316103  PMID: 25663780
Learning curve; Gastric cancer; Hand-assisted laparoscopic D2 radical gastrectomy; Operative time; Surgical quality indicators
2.  Endoscopic variceal ligation caused massive bleeding due to laceration of an esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue emboli 
World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG  2014;20(42):15937-15940.
Endoscopic variceal obturation of gastric varices with tissue glue is considered the first choice for management of gastric varices, and is usually safe and effective. However, there is still a low incidence of complications and some are even fatal. Here, we present a case in which endoscopic variceal ligation caused laceration of the esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue emboli and massive bleeding after 3 mo. Cessation of bleeding was achieved via variceal sclerotherapy using a cap-fitted gastroscope. Methods of recognizing an esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue plug are discussed.
doi:10.3748/wjg.v20.i42.15937
PMCID: PMC4229563  PMID: 25400482
Gastroesophageal varices; Variceal bleeding; Laceration; Varices ligation; Tissue glue injection
3.  Stress-induced intestinal necrosis resulting from severe trauma of an earthquake 
AIM: To investigate the possible reasons and suggest therapeutic plan of stress-induced intestinal necrosis resulting from the severe trauma.
METHODS: Three patients in our study were trapped inside collapsed structures for 22, 21 and 37 h, respectively. The patients underwent 3-4 operations after sustaining their injuries. Mechanical ventilation, intermittent hemodialysis and other treatments were also provided. The patients showed signs of peritoneal irritation on postoperative days 10-38. Small intestinal necrosis was confirmed by emergency laparotomy, and for each patient, part of the small bowel was removed.
RESULTS: Two patients who all performed 3 operations died of respiratory complications on the first and second postoperative days respectively. The third patient who performed 4 operations was discharged and made a full recovery. Three patients had the following common characteristics: (1) Multiple severe trauma events with no direct penetrating gastrointestinal injury; (2) Multiple surgeries with impaired renal function and intermittent hemodialysis treatment; (3) Progressive abdominal pain and tenderness, and peritoneal irritation was present on post-traumatic days 10-38; (4) Abdominal operations confirmed segment ulcer, necrosis of the small intestine, hyperplasia and stiffness of the intestinal wall; and (5) Pathological examinations suggested submucosal hemorrhage, necrosis, fibrosis and hyalinization of the vascular wall. Pathological examinations of all 3 patients suggested intestinal necrosis with fistulas.
CONCLUSION: Intestinal necrosis is strongly asso-ciated with stress from trauma and post-traumatic complications; timely exploratory laparotomy maybe an effective method for preventing and treating stress-induced intestinal necrosis.
doi:10.3748/wjg.v18.i17.2127
PMCID: PMC3342613  PMID: 22563202
Intestinal necrosis; Stress; Trauma; Earthquake; Exploratory laparotomy; Fatty acid binding protein
4.  Experimental study on operative methods of pancreaticojejunostomy with reference to anastomotic patency and postoperative pancreatic exocrine function 
AIM: To assess the patency of pancreaticoenterostomy and pancreatic exocrine function after three surgical methods.
METHODS: A pig model of pancreatic ductal dilation was made by ligating the main pancreatic duct. After 4 wk ligation, a total of 36 piglets were divided randomly into four groups. The piglets in the control group underwent laparotomy only; the others were treated by three anastomoses: (1) end-to-end pancreaticojejunostomy invagination (EEPJ); (2) end-to-side duct-to-mucosa sutured anastomosis (ESPJ); or (3) binding pancreaticojejunostomy (BPJ). Anastomotic patency was assessed after 8 wk by body weight gain, intrapancreatic ductal pressure, pancreatic exocrine function secretin test, pancreatography, and macroscopic and histologic features of the anastomotic site.
RESULTS: The EEPJ group had significantly slower weight gain than the ESPJ and BPJ groups on postoperative weeks 6 and 8 (P < 0.05). The animals in both the ESPJ and BPJ groups had a similar body weight gain. Intrapancreatic ductal pressure was similar in ESPJ and BPJ. However, pressure in EEPJ was significantly higher than that in ESPJ and BPJ (P < 0.05). All three functional parameters, the secretory volume, the flow rate of pancreatic juice, and bicarbonate concentration, were significantly higher in ESPJ and BPJ as compared to EEPJ (P < 0.05). However, the three parameters were similar in ESPJ and BPJ. Pancreatography performed after EEPJ revealed dilation and meandering of the main pancreatic duct, and the anastomotic site exhibited a variable degree of occlusion, and even blockage. Pancreatography of ESPJ and BPJ, however, showed normal ductal patency. Histopathology showed that the intestinal mucosa had fused with that of the pancreatic duct, with a gradual and continuous change from one to the other. For EEPJ, the portion of the pancreatic stump protruding into the jejunal lumen was largely replaced by cicatricial fibrous tissue.
CONCLUSION: A mucosa-to-mucosa pancreaticojejunostomy is the best choice for anastomotic patency when compared with EEPJ. BPJ can effectively maintain anastomotic patency and preserve pancreatic exocrine function as well as ESPJ.
doi:10.3748/wjg.14.441
PMCID: PMC2679134  PMID: 18200668
Pancreaticojejunostomy; Animal model; anastomotic patency; Pancreatic exocrine function; Histopathology; Pancreatography
5.  Association of smoking, alcohol drinking and dietary factors with esophageal cancer in high- and low-risk areas of Jiangsu Province, China 
AIM: To study the main environmental and lifestyle factors that account for the regional differences in esophageal cancer (EC) risk in low- and high-risk areas of Jiangsu Province, China.
METHODS: Since 2003, a population-based case-control study has been conducted simultaneously in low-risk (Ganyu County) and high-risk (Dafeng County) areas of Jiangsu Province, China. Using identical protocols and pre-tested standardized questionnaire, following written informed consent, eligible subjects were inquired about their detail information on potential determinants of EC, including demographic information, socio-economic status, living conditions, disease history, family cancer history, smoking, alcohol drinking, dietary habits, frequency, amount of food intake, etc. Conditional logistic regression with maximum likelihood estimation was used to obtain Odds ratio (OR) and 95 % confidence interval (95% CI), after adjustment for potential confounders.
RESULTS: In the preliminary analysis of the ongoing study, we recruited 291 pairs of cases and controls in Dafeng and 240 pairs of cases and controls in Ganyu, respectively. In both low-risk and high-risk areas, EC was inversely associated with socio-economic status, such as level of education, past economic status and body mass index. However, this disease was more frequent among those who had a family history of cancer or encountered misfortune in the past 10 years. EC was also more frequent among smokers, alcohol drinkers and fast eaters. Furthermore, there was a geographic variation of the associations between smoking, alcohol drinking and EC risk despite the similar prevalence of these risk factors in both low-risk and high-risk areas. The dose-response relationship of smoking and smoking related variables, such as age of the first smoking, duration and amount were apparent only in high-risk areas. On the contrary, a dose-response relationship on the effect of alcohol drinking on EC was observed only in low-risk areas.
CONCLUSION: The environmental risk factors, together with genetic factors and gene-environmental interactions might be the main reason for this high-risk gradient in Jiangsu Province, China.
doi:10.3748/wjg.v12.i11.1686
PMCID: PMC4124341  PMID: 16586535
Esophageal cacner; Case-control study; Smoking; Alcohol drinking; Dietary factors

Results 1-5 (5)