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1.  Stress-induced intestinal necrosis resulting from severe trauma of an earthquake 
AIM: To investigate the possible reasons and suggest therapeutic plan of stress-induced intestinal necrosis resulting from the severe trauma.
METHODS: Three patients in our study were trapped inside collapsed structures for 22, 21 and 37 h, respectively. The patients underwent 3-4 operations after sustaining their injuries. Mechanical ventilation, intermittent hemodialysis and other treatments were also provided. The patients showed signs of peritoneal irritation on postoperative days 10-38. Small intestinal necrosis was confirmed by emergency laparotomy, and for each patient, part of the small bowel was removed.
RESULTS: Two patients who all performed 3 operations died of respiratory complications on the first and second postoperative days respectively. The third patient who performed 4 operations was discharged and made a full recovery. Three patients had the following common characteristics: (1) Multiple severe trauma events with no direct penetrating gastrointestinal injury; (2) Multiple surgeries with impaired renal function and intermittent hemodialysis treatment; (3) Progressive abdominal pain and tenderness, and peritoneal irritation was present on post-traumatic days 10-38; (4) Abdominal operations confirmed segment ulcer, necrosis of the small intestine, hyperplasia and stiffness of the intestinal wall; and (5) Pathological examinations suggested submucosal hemorrhage, necrosis, fibrosis and hyalinization of the vascular wall. Pathological examinations of all 3 patients suggested intestinal necrosis with fistulas.
CONCLUSION: Intestinal necrosis is strongly asso-ciated with stress from trauma and post-traumatic complications; timely exploratory laparotomy maybe an effective method for preventing and treating stress-induced intestinal necrosis.
doi:10.3748/wjg.v18.i17.2127
PMCID: PMC3342613  PMID: 22563202
Intestinal necrosis; Stress; Trauma; Earthquake; Exploratory laparotomy; Fatty acid binding protein
2.  Experimental study on operative methods of pancreaticojejunostomy with reference to anastomotic patency and postoperative pancreatic exocrine function 
AIM: To assess the patency of pancreaticoenterostomy and pancreatic exocrine function after three surgical methods.
METHODS: A pig model of pancreatic ductal dilation was made by ligating the main pancreatic duct. After 4 wk ligation, a total of 36 piglets were divided randomly into four groups. The piglets in the control group underwent laparotomy only; the others were treated by three anastomoses: (1) end-to-end pancreaticojejunostomy invagination (EEPJ); (2) end-to-side duct-to-mucosa sutured anastomosis (ESPJ); or (3) binding pancreaticojejunostomy (BPJ). Anastomotic patency was assessed after 8 wk by body weight gain, intrapancreatic ductal pressure, pancreatic exocrine function secretin test, pancreatography, and macroscopic and histologic features of the anastomotic site.
RESULTS: The EEPJ group had significantly slower weight gain than the ESPJ and BPJ groups on postoperative weeks 6 and 8 (P < 0.05). The animals in both the ESPJ and BPJ groups had a similar body weight gain. Intrapancreatic ductal pressure was similar in ESPJ and BPJ. However, pressure in EEPJ was significantly higher than that in ESPJ and BPJ (P < 0.05). All three functional parameters, the secretory volume, the flow rate of pancreatic juice, and bicarbonate concentration, were significantly higher in ESPJ and BPJ as compared to EEPJ (P < 0.05). However, the three parameters were similar in ESPJ and BPJ. Pancreatography performed after EEPJ revealed dilation and meandering of the main pancreatic duct, and the anastomotic site exhibited a variable degree of occlusion, and even blockage. Pancreatography of ESPJ and BPJ, however, showed normal ductal patency. Histopathology showed that the intestinal mucosa had fused with that of the pancreatic duct, with a gradual and continuous change from one to the other. For EEPJ, the portion of the pancreatic stump protruding into the jejunal lumen was largely replaced by cicatricial fibrous tissue.
CONCLUSION: A mucosa-to-mucosa pancreaticojejunostomy is the best choice for anastomotic patency when compared with EEPJ. BPJ can effectively maintain anastomotic patency and preserve pancreatic exocrine function as well as ESPJ.
doi:10.3748/wjg.14.441
PMCID: PMC2679134  PMID: 18200668
Pancreaticojejunostomy; Animal model; anastomotic patency; Pancreatic exocrine function; Histopathology; Pancreatography

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