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1.  BOOTSTRAP INFERENCE FOR NETWORK CONSTRUCTION WITH AN APPLICATION TO A BREAST CANCER MICROARRAY STUDY 
The annals of applied statistics  2013;7(1):391-417.
Gaussian Graphical Models (GGMs) have been used to construct genetic regulatory networks where regularization techniques are widely used since the network inference usually falls into a high–dimension–low–sample–size scenario. Yet, finding the right amount of regularization can be challenging, especially in an unsupervised setting where traditional methods such as BIC or cross-validation often do not work well. In this paper, we propose a new method — Bootstrap Inference for Network COnstruction (BINCO) — to infer networks by directly controlling the false discovery rates (FDRs) of the selected edges. This method fits a mixture model for the distribution of edge selection frequencies to estimate the FDRs, where the selection frequencies are calculated via model aggregation. This method is applicable to a wide range of applications beyond network construction. When we applied our proposed method to building a gene regulatory network with microarray expression breast cancer data, we were able to identify high-confidence edges and well-connected hub genes that could potentially play important roles in understanding the underlying biological processes of breast cancer.
doi:10.1214/12-AOAS589
PMCID: PMC3930359  PMID: 24563684
high dimensional data; GGM; model aggregation; mixture model; FDR
2.  Learning oncogenic pathways from binary genomic instability data 
Biometrics  2011;67(1):164-173.
Summary
Genomic instability, the propensity of aberrations in chromosomes, plays a critical role in the development of many diseases. High throughput genotyping experiments have been performed to study genomic instability in diseases. The output of such experiments can be summarized as high dimensional binary vectors, where each binary variable records aberration status at one marker locus. It is of keen interest to understand how aberrations may interact with each other, as it provides insight into the process of the disease development. In this paper, we propose a novel method, LogitNet, to infer such interactions among these aberration events. The method is based on penalized logistic regression with an extension to account for spatial correlation in the genomic instability data. We conduct extensive simulation studies and show that the proposed method performs well in the situations considered. Finally, we illustrate the method using genomic instability data from breast cancer samples.
doi:10.1111/j.1541-0420.2010.01417.x
PMCID: PMC3020238  PMID: 20377578
Conditional Dependence; Graphical Model; Lasso; Loss-of-Heterozygosity; Regularized Logistic Regression
3.  Combining multiple family-based association studies 
BMC Proceedings  2007;1(Suppl 1):S162.
While high-throughput genotyping technologies are becoming readily available, the merit of using these technologies to perform genome-wide association studies has not been established. One major concern is that for studies of complex diseases and traits, the whole-genome approach requires such large sample sizes that both recruitment and genotyping pose considerable challenge. Here we propose a novel statistical method that boosts the effective sample size by combining data obtained from several studies. Specifically, we consider a situation in which various studies have genotyped non-overlapping subjects at largely non-overlapping sets of markers. Our approach, which exploits the local linkage disequilibrium structure without assuming an explicit population model, opens up the possibility of improving statistical power by incorporating existing data into future association studies.
PMCID: PMC2367479  PMID: 18466508

Results 1-3 (3)