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1.  Post-Stroke Mortality, Stroke Severity, and Preadmission Antipsychotic Medicine Use – A Population-Based Cohort Study 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(1):e84103.
Background and Purpose
It has been suggested that antipsychotic medication may be neuroprotective and may reduce post-stroke mortality, but studies are few and ambiguous. We aimed to investigate the post-stroke effects of preadmission antipsychotic use.
Methods
We conducted a nationwide, population-based cohort study of 81,143 persons admitted with stroke in Denmark from 2003–2010. Using Danish health care databases, we extracted data on preadmission use of antipsychotics and confounding factors. We examined the association between current, former, and never use of antipsychotics and stroke severity, length of hospital stay, and 30-day post-stroke mortality using logistic regression analysis, survival analysis, and propensity score matching.
Results
Current users of antipsychotics had a higher risk of severe or very severe stroke on The Scandinavian Stroke Scale than never users of antipsychotics (adjusted odds ratios, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.29–1.58). Current users were less likely to be discharged from hospital within 30 days of admission than never users (probability of non-discharge, 27.0% vs. 21.9%). Antipsychotics was associated with an increased 30-day post-stroke mortality among current users (adjusted mortality rate ratios, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.29–1.55), but not among former users (adjusted mortality rate ratios, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.98–1.14).
Conclusions
Preadmission use of antipsychotics was associated with a higher risk of severe stroke, a longer duration of hospital stay, and a higher post-stroke mortality, even after adjustment for known confounders. Antipsychotics play an important role in the treatment of many psychiatric conditions, but our findings do not support the hypothesis that they reduce stroke severity or post-stroke mortality.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0084103
PMCID: PMC3885530  PMID: 24416196
2.  Depressive Symptoms and Risk of New Cardiovascular Events or Death in Patients with Myocardial Infarction: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study Examining Health Behaviors and Health Care Interventions 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(9):e74393.
Background
Depressive symptoms is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with myocardial infarction (MI), but the underlying mechanisms are unclear and it remains unknown whether subgroups of patients are at a particularly high relative risk of adverse outcomes. We examined the risk of new cardiovascular events and/or death in patients with depressive symptoms following first-time MI taking into account other secondary preventive factors. We further explored whether we could identify subgroups of patients with a particularly high relative risk of adverse outcomes.
Methods and Results
We conducted a prospective population-based cohort study of 897 patients discharged with first-time MI between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2009, and followed up until 31 July 2012. Depressive symptoms were found in 18.6% using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D≥8). A total of 239 new cardiovascular events, 95 deaths, and 288 composite events (239 new cardiovascular events and 49 deaths) occurred during 1,975 person-years of follow-up. Event-free survival was evaluated using Cox regression analysis. Compared to the 730 patients without depressive symptoms (HADS-D<8), the 167 patients with depressive symptoms (HADS-D≥8) had age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratios [HR] (95% confidence interval [CI]) of 1.53 (95% CI, 1.14–2.05) for a new cardiovascular event, 3.10 (95% CI, 2.04–4.71) for death and 1.77 (95% CI, 1.36–2.31) for a composite event. The associations were attenuated when adjusted for disease severity, comorbid conditions and physical inactivity; HR = 1.17 (95% CI, 0.85–1.61) for a new cardiovascular event, HR = 2.01 (95% CI, 1.28–3.16) for death, and HR = 1.33 (95% CI, 1.00–1.76) for a composite event. No subgroups of patients had a particularly high risk of adverse outcomes.
Conclusions
Depressive symptoms following first-time MI was an independent prognostic risk factor for death, but not for new cardiovascular events. We found no subgroups of patients with a particularly high relative risk of adverse outcomes.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0074393
PMCID: PMC3783427  PMID: 24086339
3.  Mental health status and risk of new cardiovascular events or death in patients with myocardial infarction: a population-based cohort study 
BMJ Open  2013;3(8):e003045.
Objective
To examine the association between mental health status after first-time myocardial infarction (MI) and new cardiovascular events or death, taking into account depression and anxiety as well as clinical, sociodemographic and behavioural risk factors.
Design
Population-based cohort study based on questionnaires and nationwide registries. Mental health status was assessed 3 months after MI using the Mental Component Summary score from the Short-Form 12 V.2.
Setting
Central Denmark Region.
Participants
All patients hospitalised with first-time MI from 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2009 (n=880). The participants were categorised in quartiles according to the level of mental health status (first quartile=lowest mental health status).
Main outcome measures
Composite endpoint of new cardiovascular events (MI, heart failure, stroke/transient ischaemic attack) and all-cause mortality.
Results
During 1940 person-years of follow-up, 277 persons experienced a new cardiovascular event or died. The cumulative incidence following 3 years after MI increased consistently with decreasing mental health status and was 15% (95% CI 10.8% to 20.5%) for persons in the fourth quartile, 29.1% (23.5% to 35.6%) in the third quartile, 37.0% (30.9% to 43.9%) in the second quartile, and 47.5% (40.9% to 54.5%) in the first quartile. The HRs were high, even after adjustments for age, sociodemographic characteristics, cardiac disease severity, comorbidity, secondary prophylactic medication, smoking status, physical activity, depression and anxiety (HR3rd quartile 1.90 (95% CI 1.23 to 2.93), HR2nd quartile 2.14 (1.37 to 3.33), HR1st quartile 2.23 (1.35 to 3.68) when using the fourth quartile as reference).
Conclusions
Low mental health status following first-time MI was independently associated with an increased risk of new cardiovascular events or death. Further research is needed to disentangle the pathways that link mental health status following MI to prognosis and to identify interventions that can improve mental health status and prognosis.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003045
PMCID: PMC3733312  PMID: 23913773
Cardiology; Myocardial Infarction < Cardiology; Mental Health; Epidemiology
4.  Rehabilitation status three months after first-time myocardial infarction 
Objective
To describe the rehabilitation status three months after first-time myocardial infarction (MI) to identify focus areas for long-term cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in general practice.
Design
Population-based cross-sectional study.
Setting and subjects
Patients with first-time MI in 2009 from the Central Denmark Region. Data were obtained from patient questionnaires and from registers.
Results
Of the 1288 eligible patients, 908 (70.5%) responded. The mean (SD) age was 67.1 (11.7) years and 626 (68.9%) were men. Overall, 287 (31.6%) of the patients lived alone and 398 (45.4%) had less than 10 years of education. Upwards of half (58.5%) of the patients stated that they had participated in hospital-based rehabilitation shortly after admission. A total of 262 (29.2%) were identified with anxiety or depressive disorder or both, according to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Of these, 78 (29.8%) reported that they had participated in psychosocial support, and 55 (21.0%) used antidepressants. One in five patients smoked three months after MI although nearly half of the smokers had stopped after the MI. Regarding cardioprotective drugs, 714 (78.6%) used aspirin, 694 (76.4%) clopidogrel, 756 (83.3%) statins, and 735 (81.0%) beta-blockers.
Conclusion
After three months, there is a considerable potential for further rehabilitation of MI patients. In particular, the long-term CR should focus on mental health, smoking cessation, and cardioprotective drugs.
doi:10.3109/02813432.2011.629147
PMCID: PMC3308468  PMID: 22126219
Depression; drug therapy; family practice; myocardial infarction; rehabilitation; smoking

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