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1.  Capability of common SNPs to tag rare variants 
BMC Proceedings  2011;5(Suppl 9):S88.
Genome-wide association studies are based on the linkage disequilibrium pattern between common tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (i.e., SNPs having only common alleles) and true causal variants, and association studies with rare SNP alleles aim to detect rare causal variants. To better understand and explain the findings from both types of studies and to provide clues to improve the power of an association study with only common SNPs genotyped, we study the correlation between common SNPs and the presence of rare alleles within a region in the genome and look at the capability of common SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium with each other to capture single rare alleles. Our results indicate that common SNPs can, to some extent, tag the presence of rare alleles and that including SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium with each other among the tagging SNPs helps to detect rare alleles.
doi:10.1186/1753-6561-5-S9-S88
PMCID: PMC3287929  PMID: 22373521
2.  Comparison of a unified analysis approach for family and unrelated samples with the transmission-disequilibrium test to study associations of hypertension in the Framingham Heart Study 
BMC Proceedings  2009;3(Suppl 7):S22.
Population stratification is one of the major causes of spurious associations in association studies. A unified association approach based on principal-component analysis can overcome the effect of population stratification, as well as make use of both family and unrelated samples combined to increase power (family-case-control, or FamCC). In this study, we compared FamCC and the transmission-disequilibrium test (TDT) using data on hypertension, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure in the Framingham Heart Study. Our study indicated FamCC has reasonable type I error for both the unrelated sample and the family sample for all three traits. For these three traits, we found results from FamCC were inconsistent with those from the TDT. We discuss the reasons for this inconsistency. After correcting for multiple tests, we did not detect any significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms by either FamCC or the TDT.
PMCID: PMC2795919  PMID: 20018012

Results 1-2 (2)