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1.  Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Novel Genetic Determinants of DNA Repair Capacity in Lung Cancer 
Cancer research  2012;73(1):256-264.
Suboptimal cellular DNA repair capacity (DRC) has been shown to be associated with enhanced cancer risk, but genetic variants affecting the DRC phenotype have not been comprehensively investigated. In this study, with the available DRC phenotype data, we analyzed correlations between the DRC phenotype and genotypes detected by the Illumina 317K platform in 1,774 individuals of European ancestry from a Texas lung cancer genome-wide association study. The discovery phase was followed by a replication in an independent set of 1,374 cases and controls of European ancestry. We applied a generalized linear model with SNPs as predictors and DRC (a continuous variable) as the outcome. Covariates of age, sex, pack-years of smoking, DRC assay-related variables and case-control status of the study participants were adjusted in the model. We validated that reduced DRC was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer in both independent datasets. Several suggestive loci that contributed to the DRC phenotype were defined in ERCC2/XPD, PHACTR2 and DUSP1. In summary, we determined that DRC is an independent risk factor for lung cancer and we defined several genetic loci contributing to DRC phenotype.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-1915
PMCID: PMC3537906  PMID: 23108145
DNA repair capacity; genetic susceptibility; genome-wide association; molecular epidemiology
2.  An Expanded Risk Prediction Model for Lung Cancer 
Risk prediction models are useful in clinical decision making. We have published an internally validated prediction tool for lung cancer based on easily obtainable epidemiologic and clinical data. Because the precision of the model was modest, we now estimate the improvement obtained by adding two markers of DNA repair capacity.
Assay data (host-cell reactivation and mutagen sensitivity) were available for 725 White lung cancer cases and 615 controls, all former or current smokers, a subset of cases and controls from the previous analysis. Multivariable models were constructed from the original variables with addition of the biomarkers separately and together. Pairwise comparisons of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) and 3-fold cross-validations were done.
For former smokers, the AUC and 95% confidence intervals were 0.67 (0.63–0.71) for the baseline model and 0.70 (0.66–0.74) for the expanded model. For current smokers, the comparable AUC values were 0.68 (0.64–0.72) and 0.73 (0.69–0.77). For both groups, the expanded models were statistically significantly better than the baseline models (P = 0.006 and P = 0.0048, respectively), although the increases in the concordance statistics were modest. We also recomputed 1-year absolute risks of lung cancer as described previously for two different risk profiles and showed that individuals who exhibited poor repair capacity or heightened mutagen sensitivity had increased absolute risks of lung cancer.
Addition of biomarker assays improved the sensitivity of the expanded models.
doi:10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-08-0060
PMCID: PMC2854404  PMID: 19138968
3.  DNA Repair Capacity in Peripheral Lymphocytes Predicts Survival of Patients With Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With First-Line Platinum-Based Chemotherapy  
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2011;29(31):4121-4128.
Purpose
Platinum-based regimens are the standard chemotherapy for patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). DNA repair capacity (DRC) in tumor cells plays an important role in resistance to platinum-based drugs. We have previously reported that efficient DRC, as assessed by an in vitro lymphocyte-based assay, was a determinant of poor survival in patients with NSCLC in a relatively small data set. In this larger independent study of 591 patients with NSCLC, we further evaluated whether DRC in peripheral lymphocytes predicts survival of patients with NSCLC who receive platinum-based chemotherapy.
Patients and Methods
All patients were recruited at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and donated blood samples before the start of any chemotherapy. We measured DRC in cultured T lymphocytes by using the host-cell reactivation assay, and we assessed associations between DRC in peripheral lymphocytes and survival of patients with NSCLC who were treated with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.
Results
We found an inverse association between DRC in peripheral lymphocytes and patient survival. Compared with patients in the low tertile of DRC, patients with NSCLC in the high tertile of DRC had significantly worse overall and 3-year survival (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.33; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.71; P = .023; and HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.76; P = .025, respectively). This trend was more pronounced in patients with early-stage tumors, adenocarcinoma, or squamous cell carcinoma.
Conclusion
We confirmed that DRC in peripheral lymphocytes is an independent predictor of survival for patients with NSCLC treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2010.34.3616
PMCID: PMC3675702  PMID: 21947825
4.  Relationship Between CYP2A6 and CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 Variation and Smoking Behaviors and Lung Cancer Risk 
Genetic variations in the CYP2A6 nicotine metabolic gene and the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 (CHRNA5-A3-B4) nicotinic gene cluster have been independently associated with lung cancer. With genotype data from ever-smokers of European ancestry (417 lung cancer patients and 443 control subjects), we investigated the relative and combined associations of polymorphisms in these two genes with smoking behavior and lung cancer risk. Kruskal–Wallis tests were used to compare smoking variables among the different genotype groups, and odds ratios (ORs) for cancer risk were estimated using logistic regression analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Cigarette consumption (P < .001) and nicotine dependence (P = .036) were the highest in the combined CYP2A6 normal metabolizers and CHRNA5-A3-B4 AA (tag single-nucleotide polymorphism rs1051730 G>A) risk group. The combined risk group also exhibited the greatest lung cancer risk (OR = 2.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21 to 3.40), which was even higher among those who smoked 20 or fewer cigarettes per day (OR = 3.03; 95% CI = 1.38 to 6.66). Variation in CYP2A6 and CHRNA5-A3-B4 was independently and additively associated with increased cigarette consumption, nicotine dependence, and lung cancer risk. CYP2A6 and CHRNA5-A3-B4 appear to be more strongly associated with smoking behaviors and lung cancer risk, respectively.
doi:10.1093/jnci/djr237
PMCID: PMC3168937  PMID: 21747048
5.  An analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms of 125 DNA repair genes in the Texas genome-wide association study of lung cancer with a replication for the XRCC4 SNPs 
DNA repair  2011;10(4):398-407.
DNA repair genes are important for maintaining genomic stability and limiting carcinogenesis. We analyzed all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 125 DNA repair genes covered by the Illumina HumanHap300 (v1.1) BeadChips in a previously conducted genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 1,154 lung cancer cases and 1,137 controls and replicated the top-hits of XRCC4 SNPs in an independent set of 597 cases and 611 controls in Texas populations. We found that six of 20 XRCC4 SNPs were associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer with a P value of 0.01 or lower in the discovery dataset, of which the most significant SNP was rs10040363 (P for allelic test = 4.89 ×10−4). Moreover, the data in this region allowed us to impute a potentially functional SNP rs2075685 (imputed P for allelic test = 1.3 ×10−3). A luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that the rs2075685G>T change in the XRCC4 promoter increased expression of the gene. In the replication study of rs10040363, rs1478486, rs9293329, and rs2075685, however, only rs10040363 achieved a borderline association with a decreased risk of lung cancer in a dominant model (adjusted OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.62–1.03, P = 0.079). In the final combined analysis of both the Texas GWAS discovery and replication datasets, the strength of the association was increased for rs10040363 (adjusted OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.66–0.89, Pdominant = 5×10−4 and P for trend = 5×10−4) and rs1478486 (adjusted OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.71 −0.94, Pdominant = 6×10−3 and P for trend = 3.5×10−3). Finally, we conducted a meta-analysis of these XRCC4 SNPs with available data from published GWA studies of lung cancer with a total of 12,312 cases and 47,921 controls, in which none of these XRCC4 SNPs was associated with lung cancer risk. It appeared that rs2075685, although associated with increased expression of a reporter gene and lung cancer risk in the Texas populations, did not have an effect on lung cancer risk in other populations. This study underscores the importance of replication using published data in larger populations.
doi:10.1016/j.dnarep.2011.01.005
PMCID: PMC3062723  PMID: 21296624
XRCC4; variant; Genetic susceptibility; genome-wide association study; replication study
6.  Prospective analysis of DNA damage and repair markers of lung cancer risk from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial 
Carcinogenesis  2010;32(1):69-73.
Mutagen challenge and DNA repair assays have been used in case–control studies for nearly three decades to assess human cancer risk. The findings still engender controversy because blood was drawn after cancer diagnosis so the results may be biased, a type called ‘reverse causation’. We therefore used Epstein–Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines established from prospectively collected peripheral blood samples to evaluate lung cancer risk in relation to three DNA repair assays: alkaline Comet assay, host cell reactivation (HCR) assay with the mutagen benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide and the bleomycin mutagen sensitivity assay. Cases (n = 117) were diagnosed with lung cancer between 0.3 and 6 years after blood collection and controls (n = 117) were frequency matched on calendar year and age at blood collection, gender and smoking history; all races were included. Case and control status was unknown to laboratory investigators. In unconditional logistic regression analyses, statistically significantly increased lung cancer odds ratios (ORadjusted) were observed for bleomycin mutagen sensitivity as quartiles of chromatid breaks/cell [relative to the lowest quartile, OR = 1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5–2.5; OR = 1.4, 95% CI: 0.7–3.1; OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.0–4.4, respectively, Ptrend = 0.04]. The magnitude of the association between the bleomycin assay and lung cancer risk was modest compared with those reported in previous lung cancer studies but was strengthened when we included only incident cases diagnosed more than a year after blood collection (Ptrend = 0.02), supporting the notion the assay may be a measure of cancer susceptibility. The Comet and HCR assays were unrelated to lung cancer risk.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgq204
PMCID: PMC3010173  PMID: 20929901
7.  A functional variant of tandem repeats in human telomerase gene (hTERT) was associated with survival of patients with early stages of non-small cell lung cancer 
Purpose
Elevated levels of human telomerase (hTERT) mRNA in tumors is a marker for poorer survival in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A functional variant of MNS16A-Short tandem repeats in hTERT (S allele) is associated with higher expression levels of hTERT mRNA compared with the MNS16A-long (L) allele. However, it is unknown whether or not the hTERT MNS16A variant genotype predicts survival of NSCLC patients.
Experimental Design
The hTERT genotypes of 808 patients with NSCLC were determined by direct PCR with genomic DNA. Overall median survival times were estimated by the life-table method, and the log-rank test was used to test for homogeneity of the survival curves. Both univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the associations between survival time and the hTERT genotype as well as other known risk factors.
Results
The hTERT variant genotype was not associated with overall survival among the 808 patients. However, among 221 patients with stage I or II NSCLC, the S allele was associated with shorter survival time (P = 0.027, by Log-Rank test). The adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were 1.30 (95% CI = 0.79–2.14, P = 0.310) for the SL-genotype and 2.34 (95% CI = 1.20–4.56, P = 0.012) for the SS-genotype compared with the LL-genotype (P = 0.021 for trend test). These findings were not evident in 587 patients with stage III or IV NSCLC.
Conclusion
The functional MNS16A-SS genotype may be a marker for poorer survival in early stage NSCLC.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-10-0269
PMCID: PMC2905469  PMID: 20466886
NSCLC; VNTR; hTERT; Genotype; Prognosis
8.  Chromosome Instability and Risk of Squamous Cell Carcinomas of Head and Neck 
Cancer research  2008;68(11):4479-4485.
In 895 subjects with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and 898 cancer-free controls matched by age, sex, and ethnicity, we validated our previous finding that mutagen sensitivity as measured by the frequency of chromatid breaks in vitro induced by benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) is an independent risk factor for SCCHN. Using a previously established concentration of 4 μM BPDE to treat short-term cultured primary lymphocytes for 5 hours, we evaluated chromatid breaks in 50 well-spread metaphases for each blood sample. The mean frequency of BPDE-induced chromatid breaks was significantly higher in cases than in controls in non-Hispanic whites (P = 0.0003) but not in other ethnic groups (P = 0.549 for Hispanic Americans and 0.257 for African Americans). The odds ratio associated with risk of SCCHN for the frequency of chromatid breaks greater than median value of controls was 1.56 (95% confidence interval, 1.27–1.91) in non-Hispanic whites (767 cases and 763 controls) after adjustment for age, sex, smoking status, and drinking status. When the quartiles of the controls were used as the cutoff values, there was a dose response between the degree of mutagen sensitivity and risk of SCCHN in non-Hispanic whites (Ptrend = 0.0001). However, none of these associations in non-Hispanic whites was identified in Hispanic Americans (69 cases and 70 controls) or African Americans (59 cases and 65 controls), possibly because of the small samples of these ethnic groups or ethnic difference in genetic variation, which needs to be confirmed in future studies.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-07-6568
PMCID: PMC3079380  PMID: 18519711
mutagen sensitivity; genetic susceptibility; molecular epidemiology; chromosome aberration; head and neck cancer
9.  Reduced DNA Repair Capacity for Removing Tobacco Carcinogen-Induced DNA Adducts Contributes to Risk of Head and Neck Cancer but not Tumor Characteristics 
Purpose
Although cigarette smoking and alcohol use are known risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN), only a few exposed individuals develop this disease, suggesting an individual susceptibility. In this study, we investigated the associations between genetically determined DNA repair capacity (DRC) for removing tobacco-induced DNA adducts and risk of SCCHN and tumor characteristics.
Experimental Design
We measured DRC in cultured T-lymphocytes using the host-cell reactivation assay in a hospital-based case-control study of 744 SCCHN patients and 753 age-, sex-and ethnicity-matched cancer-free controls recruited from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.
Results
Patients with SCCHN had significantly lower mean DRC (8.84% ± 2.68%) than controls (9.97% ± 2.61%) (P < 0.0001), and the difference accounted for approximately 2-fold increased risk of SCCHN (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.91; 95% CI, 1.52–2.40) after adjustment for other covariates. Compared with the highest DRC quartile of controls, this increased risk was dose-dependent (second highest quartile: OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.99–1.98; third quartile: OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.34–2.62; and fourth quartile: OR, 2.76; 95% CI, 1.98–3.84, respectively; Ptrend < 0.0001). We also assessed the performance of DRC in risk prediction models by calculating the area of under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The addition of DRC to the model significantly improved the sensitivity of the expanded model. However, we did not find the association between DRC and tumor sites and stages.
Conclusion
DRC is an independent susceptibility biomarker for SCCHN risk but not a tumor marker.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-09-2156
PMCID: PMC2848391  PMID: 20068090
nucleotide excision repair; genetic susceptibility; head and neck neoplasm; molecular epidemiology
10.  Smoking-related Genomic Signatures in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer 
Rationale: Tobacco smoking is responsible for 85% of all lung cancers. To further our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer, we determined whether smoking history leads to the emergence of specific genomic alterations found in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Objectives: To identify gene copy number alterations in NSCLCs associated with smoking history or DNA repair capacity.
Methods: Seventy-five NSCLCs were selected for this study from patients with current, none, or past smoking history, including pack year information. Tissue sections were microdissected, and DNA was extracted, purified, and labeled by random priming before hybridization onto bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays. Normalized ratios were correlated with smoking history and DNA repair capacity was measured by an in vitro lymphocyte assay in the same patients.
Measurements and Main Results: We identified smoking-related genomic signatures in NSCLCs that could be predicted with an overall 74% accuracy. Lung tumors arising from current-smokers had the greatest number of copy number alterations. The genomic regions most significantly associated with smoking were located within 60 regions and were functionally associated with genes controlling the M phase of the cell cycle, the segregation of chromosomes, and the methylation of DNA. Verification of the data is provided from data in the public domain and by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The associations between genomic abnormalities and DNA repair capacity did not reach statistical significance.
Conclusions: These findings indicate that smoking history leaves a specific genomic signature in the DNA of lung tumors and suggest that these alterations may reflect new molecular pathways to cancer development.
doi:10.1164/rccm.200801-142OC
PMCID: PMC2720147  PMID: 18776155
array comparative genomic hybridization; tobacco; profile; microarray
11.  Polymorphisms of cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase and risk of lung cancer: a case–control analysis 
Summary
The suboptimal DNA repair capacity is a risk factor for cancer that may be modulated by dietary nutrient intake, and the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) participates in folate metabolism and synthesis of purine and pyrimidine needed for DNA repair. Therefore, we tested our hypothesis that genetic variants of the cytosolic SHMT (SHMT1) gene are associated with lung cancer risk. In a hospital-based case-control study of 1032 non-Hispanic white lung cancer patients and 1145 matched cancer-free controls, we genotyped five common SHMT1 polymorphisms either in the promoter, exons, or 3′-untranslated regions. Although the genotype and allele frequency distribution of each SNP did not differ between cases and controls statistically significantly in the single-locus analysis, the rs638416 polymorphism in the promoter alone and the combined putative risk variant genotypes containing rs643333C, rs638416G, rs1979277T, rs3738G, and rs1979276C were associated with altered risk. Those carrying the combined 3+ risk variant genotypes had an increased risk of lung cancer (adjusted OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.05–2.57, compared with those having 0–1 risk genotypes; and OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.01–1.45, compared with those having 0–2 risk genotypes). The risk was more pronounced among older individuals (>61 years) or those having a low total folate intake or a high methionine intake. No evidence of interactions between the putative SHMT risk variant genotypes and the selected variables was found. These results suggest that SHMT1 variants may play a role in the etiology of lung cancer, and our findings need to be verified in larger prospective studies.
doi:10.1016/j.lungcan.2007.03.002
PMCID: PMC2693017  PMID: 17420066
DNA repair; genetic susceptibility; lung cancer; serine hydroxymethyltransferase; tetrahydrofolate metabolism
12.  Dietary magnesium and DNA repair capacity as risk factors for lung cancer 
Carcinogenesis  2008;29(5):949-956.
Magnesium (Mg) is required for maintenance of genomic stability; however, data on the relationship between dietary Mg intake and lung cancer are lacking. In an ongoing lung cancer case–control study, we identified 1139 cases and 1210 matched healthy controls with data on both diet and DNA repair capacity (DRC). Dietary intake was assessed using a modified Block-NCI food frequency questionnaire and DRC was measured using the host-cell reactivation assay to assess repair in lymphocyte cultures. After adjustment for potential confounding factors including DRC, the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for lung cancer with increasing quartiles of dietary Mg intake were 1.0, 0.83 (0.66–1.05), 0.64 (0.50–0.83) and 0.47 (0.36–0.61), respectively, for all subjects (P-trend < 0.0001). Similar results were observed by histology and clinical stage of lung cancer. Low dietary Mg intake was associated with poorer DRC and increased risk of lung cancer. In joint effects analyses, compared with those with high dietary Mg intake and proficient DRC, the OR (95% CI) for lung cancer in the presence of both low dietary Mg and suboptimal DRC was 2.36 (1.83–3.04). Similar results were observed for men and women. The effects were more pronounced among older subjects (>60 years), current or heavier smokers, drinkers, those with a family history of cancer in first-degree relatives, small cell lung cancer and late-stage disease. These intriguing results need to be confirmed in prospective studies.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgn043
PMCID: PMC2902380  PMID: 18448487
13.  Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Selected Apoptotic Genes and BPDE-Induced Apoptotic Capacity in Apparently Normal Primary Lymphocytes: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation Analysis 
Journal of Cancer Epidemiology  2008;2008:147905.
Apoptotic capacity (AC) in primary lymphocytes may be a marker for cancer susceptibility, and functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in apoptotic pathways may modulate cellular AC in response to DNA damage. To further examine the correlation between apoptotic genotypes and phenotype, we genotyped 14 published SNPs in 11 apoptosis-related genes (i.e., p53, Bcl-2, BAX, CASP9, DR4, Fas, FasL, CASP8, CASP10, CASP3, and CASP7) and assessed the AC in response to benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-9,10-diol epoxide (BPDE) in cultured primary lymphocytes from 172 cancer-free subjects. We found that among these 14 SNPs, R72P, intron 3 16-bp del/ins, and intron 6 G>A in p53, −938C>A in Bcl-2, and I522L in CASP10 were significant predictors of the BPDE-induced lymphocytic AC in single-locus analysis. In the combined analysis of the three p53 variants, we found that the individuals with the diplotypes carrying 0-1 copy of the common p53 R-del-G haplotype had higher AC values compared to other genotypes. Although the study size may not have the statistical power to detect the role of other SNPs in AC, our findings suggest that some SNPs in genes involved in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway may modulate lymphocytic AC in response to BPDE exposure in the general population. Larger studies are needed to validate these findings for further studying individual susceptibility to cancer and other apoptosis-related diseases.
doi:10.1155/2008/147905
PMCID: PMC2859018  PMID: 20445773
14.  Roles of genetic variants in the PI3K and RAS/RAF pathways in susceptibility to endometrial cancer and clinical outcomes 
Purpose
The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/PTEN/AKT/mTOR and Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathways have been implicated in endometrial tumorigenesis. In this candidate pathway analysis, we investigated associations between genetic variations in these two pathways and both risk and clinical outcomes of endometrial cancer.
Methods
We genotyped a total of 48 potentially functional SNPs in 11 key genes (AKT1, AKT2, AKT3, BRAF, FRAP1, KRAS, PDPK1, PIK3CA, PIK3CB, PIK3R1, and PTEN) with the Sequenom genotyping platform in 115 endometrial cancer patients and 230 cancer-free women to evaluate their associations with risk, survival, and recurrence of endometrial cancer.
Results
We found the following: (1) PIK3CA rs6443624 and rs9838411 variants either borderline or significantly decreased risk of endometrial cancer in a dominant model (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39–1.00 and 0.59; 95% CI, 0.36–0.95, respectively). Furthermore, there was a statistically significant multiplicative interaction (Pint = 0.036) between these two loci in risk of endometrial cancer. In contrast, the AKT1 rs2498801 genotype significantly increased risk of endometrial cancer (adjusted OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.02–3.67 in a recessive model). (2) In Cox regression analyses, three SNPs (PIK3R1 rs1862162, AKT2 rs892119, and PIK3CA rs2699887) showed significant associations with survival of endometrial cancer patients. (3) KRAS rs7312175 and PIK3CA rs6443624 had significant effects on recurrence of endometrial cancer individually and combined in a locus–dosage manner (adjusted Ptrend = 0.003).
Conclusion
These results suggest that common genetic variations in these pathways may modulate risk and clinical outcomes of endometrial cancer. Further replication and functional studies are needed to confirm these findings.
doi:10.1007/s00432-011-1103-0
PMCID: PMC3526101  PMID: 22146979
PI3K/PTEN/AKT/mTOR and RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathways; Polymorphisms; Endometrial cancer risk; Survival; Recurrence
15.  Association of a novel functional promoter variant (rs2075533 C>T) in the apoptosis gene TNFSF8 with risk of lung cancer—a finding from Texas lung cancer genome-wide association study 
Carcinogenesis  2011;32(4):507-515.
Published genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified few variants in the known biological pathways involved in lung cancer etiology. To mine the possibly hidden causal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we explored all SNPs in the extrinsic apoptosis pathway from our published GWAS dataset for 1154 lung cancer cases and 1137 cancer-free controls. In an initial association analysis of 611 tagSNPs in 41 apoptosis-related genes, we identified only 10 tagSNPs associated with lung cancer risk with a P value <10−2, including four tagSNPs in DAPK1 and three tagSNPs in TNFSF8. Unlike DAPK1 SNPs, TNFSF8 rs2181033 tagged other four predicted functional but untyped SNPs (rs776576, rs776577, rs31813148 and rs2075533) in the promoter region. Therefore, we further tested binding affinity of these four SNPs by performing the electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We found that only rs2075533T allele modified levels of nuclear proteins bound to DNA, leading to significantly decreased expression of luciferase reporter constructs by 5- to –10-fold in H1299, HeLa and HCT116 cell lines compared with the C allele. We also performed a replication study of the untyped rs2075533 in an independent Texas population but did not confirm the protective effect. We further performed a mini meta-analysis for SNPs of TNFSF8 obtained from other four published lung cancer GWASs with 12  214 cases and 47  721 controls, and we found that only rs3181366 (r2 = 0.69 with the untyped rs2075533) was associated to lung cancer risk (P = 0.008). Our findings suggest a possible role of novel TNFSF8 variants in susceptibility to lung cancer.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgr014
PMCID: PMC3066422  PMID: 21292647

Results 1-15 (15)