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1.  AP2β nucleolar localization predicts poor survival after stage I non–small cell lung cancer resection 
The Annals of Thoracic Surgery  2011;92(3):1044-1050.
Background
Activating enhancer-binding protein-2β (AP2β) is a transcription factor involved in apoptosis. The purpose of the current study was to assess the cellular location and level of AP2β in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and normal lung tissue and investigate whether the level and localization of AP2β expression is predictive of overall survival in patients with stage I NSCLC.
Methods
We performed immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarrays (TMAs) prepared from stage I NSCLC specimens with adjacent normal lung tissue from two independent sets of patients who underwent lung resection with curative intent at our institution. AP2β intensity was assessed in TMAs, and AP2β staining patterns were classified as either diffuseor nucleolar in the TMAs. AP2β intensity and localization were analyzed for correlation with patients' survival.
Results
Immunohistochemical analysis of TMAs showed that the intensity of AP2β immunohistochemical staining did not correlate with overall survival. When location of AP2β was analyzed in TMAs, all of the normal lung tissue had diffuse pattern of AP2β. In the first set of NSCLC, patients with nucleolar pattern had a significantly lower 5-year survival rate than patients with diffuse pattern (67% vs. 100%; P = 0.004); this finding was confirmed in the second set (64% vs. 91%; P = 0.02). Multivariate analysis revealed that nucleolar pattern was an independent predictor of poor overall survival in both sets.
Conclusions
The AP2β which is located in the nucleoplasm in normal lung tissue is found in either nucleoplasm or nucleoli in NSCLC. The patients with AP2β in the nucleoli had poor survival compared to patients with AP2β in the cytoplasm.
doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2011.04.029
PMCID: PMC3272351  PMID: 21871297
Lung cancer biology; survival analysis
2.  Genetically Abnormal Circulating Cells in Lung Cancer Patients: An Antigen Independent Fluorescence in-situ Hybridization Based Case-Control Study 
Purpose
We performed a study to determine if a fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH)-based assay using isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with DNA probes targeting specific sites on chromosomes known to have abnormalities in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) cases could detect circulating genetically abnormal cells (CACs).
Experimental Design
We evaluated 59 NSCLC cases with stage I through IV disease and 24 controls. PBMCs and matched tumors were hybridized with 2 two-color (3p22.1/CEP3 and 10q22.3 [SP-A]/CEP10) and 2 four-color (CEP3, CEP7, CEP17, and 9p21.3 [URO]) and (EGFR, c-MYC, 6p11-q11, and 5p15.2 [LAV]) FISH probes. Percentages of cytogenetically abnormal cells (CACs) in peripheral blood and in matched tumor specimens were quantified using an automated fluorescent scanner. Numbers of CACs were calculated based on the percentage of CACs (defined as PBMCs with genetic abnormalities) per mL of blood and expressed per microliter of blood.
Results
Patients with NSCLC had significantly higher numbers of CACs than did controls. Mean number of CACs ranged from 7.23±1.32/μl for deletions of 10q22.3/CEP10 to 45.52±7.49/μl for deletions of 3p22.1/CEP3. Numbers of CACs with deletions of 3p22.1, 10q22.3, and 9p21.3, and gains of URO, increased significantly from early to advanced stage of disease.
Conclusions
We have developed a sensitive and quantitative antigen-independent FISH-based test for detecting CACs in peripheral blood of patients with NSCLC which showed a significant correlation with the presence of cancer. If this pilot study can be validated in a larger study, CACs may have a role in the management of patients with NSCLC.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-09-3358
PMCID: PMC2949278  PMID: 20651054
3.  3p22.1 and 10q22.3 Deletions Detected by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) 
Journal of Thoracic Oncology  2008;3(9):979-984.
Background
Our objective was to study the feasibility of detecting chromosomal deletions at 3p22.1 and 10q22.3 by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and to examine their distribution in different areas of the airway in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
Methods
Brush biopsies from the mainstem bronchus on the normal side contralateral to the tumor (NBB) and mainstem bronchus on the tumor side (TBB) were obtained from 122 patients who underwent surgical resection. Touch preparations from the tumor (TTP), normal lung parenchyma, and bronchi adjacent to the tumor were also obtained. Two FISH assays using probes complementary to 3p22.1 and 10q22.3 were used to detect deletions.
Results
NBB showed a relatively low deletion rate of 3p22.1 and 10q22.3 compared with TTP (p < 0.0001). TBB showed a significantly higher rate of deletions compared with NBB but lower than TTP from the tumor (p < 0.05) for both 3p22.1 and 10q22.3. A significantly higher deletion rate was seen at TTP compared with normal lung parenchyma at both the 3p22.1 and 10 q22.3 (p < 0.0001). Correlations were seen between the deletion rates of TTP and TBB at 3p22.1 (ρ = 0.61, p < 0.0001) and between TTP and bronchi adjacent to the tumor at 10q22.3 (ρ = 0.64, p < 0.0001).
Conclusion
Deletions of the 3p22.1 and 10q22.3 regions can be reliably detected by FISH. As one progresses from the contralateral normal bronchus to the bronchus on the side of tumor and the tumor itself, the percentage of chromosomal deletions increases in a statistically significant fashion. This suggests that, FISH analysis of bronchoscopic brushes may be useful for identifying patients at high risk for developing non-small cell lung cancer.
doi:10.1097/JTO.0b013e3181834f3a
PMCID: PMC3370669  PMID: 18758299
Lung; Cancer; Non-small cell; Screening; Fluorescent in situ hybridization; Bronchial brushes

Results 1-3 (3)