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author:("Singh, ladji")
1.  SSRD: Simple Sequence Repeats Database of the Human Genome 
Simple sequence repeats are predominantly found in most organisms. They play a major role in studies of genetic diversity, and are useful as diagnostic markers for many diseases. The simple sequence repeats database (SSRD) for the human genome was created for easy access to such repeats, for analysis, and to be used to understand their biological significance. The data includes the abundance and distribution of SSRs in the coding and non-coding regions of the genome, as well as their association with the UTRs of genes. The exact locations of repeats with respect to genomic regions (such as UTRs, exons, introns or intergenic regions) and their association with STS markers are also highlighted. The resource will facilitate repeat sequence analysis in the human genome and the understanding of the functional and evolutionary significance of simple sequence repeats. SSRD is available through two websites, http://www.ccmb.res.in/ssr and http://www.ingenovis.com/ssr.
doi:10.1002/cfg.289
PMCID: PMC2448451  PMID: 18629286
2.  Genome-wide analysis of microsatellite repeats in humans: their abundance and density in specific genomic regions 
Genome Biology  2003;4(2):R13.
Simple sequence repeats are found in most organisms, and occupy about 3% of the human genome. The densities of simple sequence repeats across the human chromosomes were found to be relatively uniform. Tri- and hexa-nucleotide repeats are more abundant in exons, whereas other repeats are more abundant in non-coding regions.
Background
Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are found in most organisms, and occupy about 3% of the human genome. Although it is becoming clear that such repeats are important in genomic organization and function and may be associated with disease conditions, their systematic analysis has not been reported. This is the first report examining the distribution and density of simple sequence repeats (1-6 base-pairs (bp)) in the entire human genome.
Results
The densities of SSRs across the human chromosomes were found to be relatively uniform. However, the overall density of SSR was found to be high in chromosome 19. Triplets and hexamers were more predominant in exonic regions compared to intronic and intergenic regions, except for chromosome Y. Comparison of densities of various SSRs revealed that whereas trimers and pentamers showed a similar pattern (500-1,000 bp/Mb) across the chromosomes, di- tetra- and hexa-nucleotide repeats showed patterns of higher (2,000-3,000 bp/Mb) density. Repeats of the same nucleotide were found to be higher than other repeat types. Repeats of A, AT, AC, AAT, AAC, AAG, AGC, AAAC, AAAT, AAAG, AAGG, AGAT predominate, whereas repeats of C, CG, ACT, ACG, AACC, AACG, AACT, AAGC, AAGT, ACCC, ACCG, ACCT, CCCG and CCGG are rare.
Conclusions
The overall SSR density was comparable in all chromosomes. The density of different repeats, however, showed significant variation. Tri- and hexa-nucleotide repeats are more abundant in exons, whereas other repeats are more abundant in non-coding regions.
doi:10.1186/gb-2003-4-2-r13
PMCID: PMC151303  PMID: 12620123

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