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1.  Zoledronic acid preserves bone mineral density in premenopausal women who develop ovarian failure due to adjuvant chemotherapy: Final results from CALGB trial 79809 
Background
Chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure (CIOF) is a frequent side effect of adjuvant chemotherapy that results in rapid bone loss. We hypothesized that zoledronic acid (ZA), a third-generation amino bisphosphonate, would prevent bone loss in premenopausal women who developed CIOF.
Methods
439 women were randomized to intravenous (IV) ZA 4 mg every 3 months for 2 years starting within 1–3 months (mos) after randomization (arm A) or 1 year after randomization (arm B, controls). CIOF was prospectively defined as ≥ 3 months of amenorrhea, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) ≥ 30 MIU/ml and non-pregnant at 1 year. The primary endpoint was the percentage change in bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine (LS) from baseline to 12 months in the ZA and control groups in women who developed CIOF; the secondary endpoint was BMD in LS at 3 years in all randomized women.
Findings
150 (56%) met the definition of CIOF at 1 year. Overall, grade 3 toxicities of ZA were fatigue (1%) arthralgias (1%) and pain (4%). The median percent change (interquartile range, IQR) at 1 year was +1.2% (−0.5% to +2.8%) and −6.7% (−9.7% to −2.9%) p<0.001 and at 3 years was +1.0% (−1.6% to +5.2%) and −0.5% (−3.7% to +3.2%) p=0.019 in arms A and B, respectively.
Interpretation
ZA every 3 months is well tolerated and prevents rapid bone loss in premenopausal women that develop CIOF. Giving ZA with rather than one year after the start adjuvant chemotherapy is the preferred sequence to prevent bone loss.
doi:10.1016/j.ejca.2010.11.024
PMCID: PMC4211594  PMID: 21324674
2.  Incidence and risk of central nervous system metastases as site of first recurrence in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer treated with adjuvant trastuzumab 
Annals of Oncology  2013;24(6):1526-1533.
Background
Central nervous system (CNS) disease as the site of first relapse after exposure to adjuvant trastuzumab has been reported. We carried out comprehensive meta-analysis to determine the risk of CNS metastases as the first site of recurrence in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer who received adjuvant trastuzumab.
Methods
Eligible studies include randomized trials of adjuvant trastuzumab administered for 1 year to patients with HER2-positive breast cancer who reported CNS metastases as first site of disease recurrence. Statistical analyses were conducted to calculate the incidence, relative risk (RR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using fixed-effects inverse variance and random-effects models.
Results
A total of 9020 patients were included. The incidence of CNS metastases as first site of disease recurrence in HER2-positive patients receiving adjuvant trastuzumab was 2.56% (95% CI 2.07% to 3.01%) compared with 1.94% (95% CI 1.54% to 2.38%) in HER2-positive patients who did not receive adjuvant trastuzumab. The RR of the CNS as first site of relapse in trastuzumab-treated patients was 1.35 (95% CI 1.02–1.78, P = 0.038) compared with control arms without trastuzumab therapy. The ratio of CNS metastases to total number of recurrence events was 16.94% (95% CI 10.85% to 24.07%) and 8.33% (95% CI 6.49% to 10.86%) for the trastuzumab-treated and control groups, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found based on trastuzumab schedule or median follow-up time. No evidence of publication bias was observed.
Conclusions
Adjuvant trastuzumab is associated with a significant increased risk of CNS metastases as the site of first recurrence in HER2-positive breast cancer patients.
doi:10.1093/annonc/mdt036
PMCID: PMC3660080  PMID: 23463626
breast cancer; central nervous system; hER2; meta-analysis; metastases; trastuzumab
3.  Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of mitomycin C and celecoxib as potential modulators of tumor resistance to irinotecan in patients with solid malignancies 
Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology  2008;63(6):1073-1082.
Purpose
Based on the preclinical evidence of topoisomerase I (Topo-1) upregulation by mitomycin C(MMC) and decreased NF-κB activation by celecoxib, we evaluated combinations of irinotecan/MMC and irinotecan/MMC/celecoxib in patients with advanced solid malignancies.
Patients–methods
Initially, patients received MMC on day 1 and irinotecan on days 2, 8, 15 and 22, every 6 weeks. MMC dose was fixed at 6 mg/m2 and cumulative doses of >36 mg/m2 were not permitted. Irinotecan was escalated in 25 mg/m2 increments. Due to late-onset diarrhea, the schedule was subsequently shortened to 4 weeks, omitting irinotecan on days 15 and 22. In the second part of the study, celecoxib 400 mg orally twice daily was added to irinotecan/MMC regimen. Potential pharmacokinetic interactions and Topo-1 and DT-diaphorase (NQ01) gene expressions in peripheral-mononuclear cells were evaluated.
Results
Forty-five patients were enrolled. Irinotecan 125 mg/m2 on days 2 and 8 in combination with MMC 6 mg/m2 on day 1 every 4 weeks is recommended for future studies; myelosuppression and diarrhea are dose-limiting. The addition of celecoxib resulted in unacceptable toxicities despite reductions on irinotecan’s dose. No relevant pharmacokinetic interactions occurred between irinotecan and MMC, and mean increases in Topo-1, were observed. Sixteen of 36 patients evaluable for response-assessment had discernable anti-tumor activity, including 1 complete, 4 partial, 10 minor and 1 tumor marker response. Four patients had prolonged (>4 months) disease-stability (stable disease, not included in CR or PR). Patients experiencing complete and partial responses had higher increments in Topo-1 expression.
Conclusions
Modulation of irinotecan by MMC is feasible, devoid of pharmacological interactions and active in solid malignancies. The lack of improvement in therapeutic index does not support the addition of celecoxib.
doi:10.1007/s00280-008-0826-3
PMCID: PMC3933356  PMID: 18795290
Phase I; Pharmacokinetic; Mitomycin C; Irinotecan; Celecoxib; Modulation
4.  High STOP-Bang score indicates a high probability of obstructive sleep apnoea 
BJA: British Journal of Anaesthesia  2012;108(5):768-775.
Background
The STOP-Bang questionnaire is used to screen patients for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). We evaluated the association between STOP-Bang scores and the probability of OSA.
Methods
After Institutional Review Board approval, patients who visited the preoperative clinics for a scheduled inpatient surgery were approached for informed consent. Patients answered STOP questionnaire and underwent either laboratory or portable polysomnography (PSG). PSG recordings were scored manually. The BMI, age, neck circumference, and gender (Bang) were documented. Over 4 yr, 6369 patients were approached and 1312 (20.6%) consented. Of them, 930 completed PSG, and 746 patients with complete data on PSG and STOP-Bang questionnaire were included for data analysis.
Results
The median age of 746 patients was 60 yr, 49% males, BMI 30 kg m−2, and neck circumference 39 cm. OSA was present in 68.4% with 29.9% mild, 20.5% moderate, and 18.0% severe OSA. For a STOP-Bang score of 5, the odds ratio (OR) for moderate/severe and severe OSA was 4.8 and 10.4, respectively. For STOP-Bang 6, the OR for moderate/severe and severe OSA was 6.3 and 11.6, respectively. For STOP-Bang 7 and 8, the OR for moderate/severe and severe OSA was 6.9 and 14.9, respectively. The predicted probabilities for moderate/severe OSA increased from 0.36 to 0.60 as the STOP-Bang score increased from 3 to 7 and 8.
Conclusions
In the surgical population, a STOP-Bang score of 5–8 identified patients with high probability of moderate/severe OSA. The STOP-Bang score can help the healthcare team to stratify patients for unrecognized OSA, practice perioperative precautions, or triage patients for diagnosis and treatment.
doi:10.1093/bja/aes022
PMCID: PMC3325050  PMID: 22401881
mass screening; obstructive/ep (epidemiology); polysomnography; prospective studies; questionnaires; sleep apnoea; snoring/di (diagnosis); snoring/ep (epidemiology)
5.  Do cell surface trafficking impairments account for variable cell surface sodium iodide symporter levels in breast cancer? 
The Na+/I- symporter (NIS) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates iodide uptake into thyroid follicular cells and serves as the molecular basis of radioiodine imaging and therapy for thyroid cancer patients. The finding that NIS protein is present in 80-90% of breast tumors suggests that breast cancer patients may also benefit from NIS-mediated radionuclide imaging and targeted therapy. However, only 17-25% of NIS-positive breast tumors have detectable radionuclide uptake activity. The discrepancy between NIS expression and radionuclide uptake activity is most likely contributed by variable cell surface NIS protein levels. Apart from the prevalent view that NIS cell surface trafficking impairments account for the variability, our current study proposes that differential levels of NIS expression may also account for variable cell surface NIS levels among breast tumors. We address the need to confirm the identity of intracellular NIS staining to reveal the mechanisms underlying variable cell surface NIS levels. In addition, we warrant a quantitative correlation between cell surface NIS levels and radionuclide uptake activity in patients such that the cell surface NIS levels required for radionuclide imaging can be defined and the defects impairing NIS activity can be recognized.
doi:10.1007/s10549-008-0059-5
PMCID: PMC2697904  PMID: 18500672
Breast cancer; glycoprotein; iodide uptake; radionuclide imaging and therapy; sodium iodide symporter (NIS)
6.  Preliminary randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of tryptophan combined with fluoxetine to treat major depressive disorder: antidepressant and hypnotic effects. 
OBJECTIVE: Because the initial phase of treatment of depression with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is often complicated by a delayed onset of action of the antidepressant or severe insomnia or both, we investigated whether tryptophan, an amino acid with both antidepressant-augmenting and hypnotic effects, would benefit patients with depression at the beginning of treatment with fluoxetine. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. PATIENTS: Thirty individuals with major depressive disorder. INTERVENTIONS: Treatment over 8 weeks with 20 mg of fluoxetine per day and either tryptophan (2 to 4 g per day) or placebo. OUTCOME MEASURES: Mood was assessed using the 29-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-29) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Laboratory sleep studies were done at baseline and after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment using standard procedures. RESULTS: During the first week of treatment, there was a significantly greater decrease in HDRS-29 depression scores, and a similar trend in BDI scores, in the tryptophan/fluoxetine group than in the placebo/fluoxetine group. No significant differences were noted at later time points. With respect to sleep measures, there was a significant group-by-time interaction for slow-wave sleep at week 4. Further analysis revealed a significant decrease in slow-wave sleep after 4 weeks of treatment in the placebo/fluoxetine group, but not in the tryptophan/fluoxetine group. No cases of serotonin syndrome occurred, and the combination was well tolerated, although the 4 g per day dosage of tryptophan produced daytime drowsiness. CONCLUSIONS: Combining 20 mg of fluoxetine with 2 g of tryptophan daily at the outset of treatment for major depressive disorder appears to be a safe protocol that may have both a rapid antidepressant effect and a protective effect on slow-wave sleep. Further large-scale studies are needed to confirm these initial findings.
PMCID: PMC1407729  PMID: 11022398
7.  Pseudo-narcolepsy: case report. 
This report describes the case of a 44-year-old woman presenting to a Sleep and Alertness clinic with symptoms of narcolepsy. The patient had clinical and polysomnographic features of narcolepsy, which disappeared after disclosure of severe psychological stress. Following a discussion of the differential diagnosis of narcolepsy, alternative diagnoses are considered. The authors suggest that the patient had a hysterical conversion disorder, or "pseudo-narcolepsy." Careful inquiry into psychological factors in unusual cases of narcolepsy may be warranted.
PMCID: PMC1189038  PMID: 10516803
8.  An outbreak of hepatitis A associated with an infected foodhandler. 
Public Health Reports  1999;114(2):157-164.
OBJECTIVE: The recommended criteria for public notification of a hepatitis A virus (HAV)-infected foodhandler include assessment of the foodhandler's hygiene and symptoms. In October 1994, a Kentucky health department received a report of a catering company foodhandler with hepatitis A. Patrons were not offered immune globulin because the foodhandler's hygiene was assessed to be good and he denied having diarrhea. During early November, 29 cases of hepatitis A were reported among people who had attended an event catered by this company. Two local health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in collaboration with two state health departments, undertook an investigation to determine the extent of the outbreak, to identify the foods and event characteristics associated with illness, and to investigate the apparent failure of the criteria for determining when immune globulin (IG) should be offered to exposed members of the public. METHODS: Cases were IgM anti-HAV-positive people with onset of symptoms during October or November who had eaten foods prepared by the catering company. To determine the outbreak's extent and factors associated with illness, the authors interviewed all case patients and the infected foodhandler and collected information on menus and other event characteristics. To investigate characteristics of events associated with transmission, the authors conducted a retrospective analysis comparing the risk of illness by selected event characteristics. To evaluate what foods were associated with illness, they conducted a retrospective cohort study of attendees of four events with high attack rates. RESULTS: A total of 91 cases were identified. At least one case was reported from 21 (51%) of the 41 catered events. The overall attack rate was 7% among the 1318 people who attended these events (range 0 to 75% per event). Attending an event at which there was no on-site sink (relative risk [RR] = 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4, 3.8) or no on-site kitchen (RR = 1.9, 95% Cl 1.1, 2.9) was associated with illness. For three events with high attack rates, eating at least one of several uncooked foods was associated with illness, with RRs ranging from 8 to undefined. CONCLUSION: A large hepatitis A outbreak resulted from an infected foodhandler with apparent good hygiene and no reported diarrhea who prepared many uncooked foods served at catered events. Assessing hygiene and symptoms s subjective, and may be difficult to accomplish. The effectiveness of the recommended criteria for determining when IG should be provided to exposed members of the public needs to be evaluated.
PMCID: PMC1308455  PMID: 10199718
9.  Preventing hepatitis B in people in close contact with hepatocellular carcinoma patients. 
Public Health Reports  1997;112(1):63-65.
OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of testing for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the clinical management of primary liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma). METHODS: The authors reviewed the records of 78 patients treated for hepatocellular carcinoma in hospitals in the Puget Sound area in 1988 and early 1989 and reviewed all 1990 U.S. death certificates on which primary liver cancer was listed. RESULTS: The records of 50 (64%) of 78 hepatocellular carcinoma patients contained no evidence that the patient's hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) status had been determined. In addition, of 4353 people who died in 1990 for whom the diagnosis of primary liver cancer was listed on the death certificate, HBV infection was also listed for only 136 (3%), much less than expected based on case series. CONCLUSIONS: Many patients with hepatocellular carcinoma are not tested for HBV infection, suggesting that their close contacts are also not evaluated for HBV infection and the need for vaccination. Hepatitis B vaccination of close personal contacts of HBV-infected hepatocellular carcinoma patients is an important strategy for preventing HBV transmission.
PMCID: PMC1381841  PMID: 9018291
10.  Epidemiology of group C rotavirus infection in Western New York women of childbearing age. 
Journal of Clinical Microbiology  1997;35(2):486-488.
Umbilical cord serum samples (380), an average of 10 per month for 3 years (1990 to 1992), were tested by indirect immunofluorescence assay for group C rotavirus immunoglobulin G. Thirty percent were positive, suggesting that approximately one-third of women of childbearing age in western New York have experienced group C rotavirus infection.
PMCID: PMC229607  PMID: 9003623
11.  Morbidity in nocturnal asthma: sleep quality and daytime cognitive performance. 
Thorax  1991;46(8):569-573.
Most patients with asthma waken with nocturnal asthma from time to time. To assess morbidity in patients with nocturnal asthma nocturnal sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and daytime cognitive performance were measured prospectively in 12 patients with nocturnal asthma (median age 43 years) and 12 age and intellect matched normal subjects. The median (range) percentage overnight fall in peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) was 22 (15 to 50) in the patients with nocturnal asthma and 4 (-4 to 7) in the normal subjects. The patients with asthma had poorer average scores for subjective sleep quality than the normal subjects (median paired difference 1.1 (95% confidence limits 0.1, 2.3)). Objective overnight sleep quality was also worse in the asthmatic patients, who spent more time awake at night (median difference 51 (95% CL 8.1, 74) minutes), had a longer sleep onset latency (12 (10, 30) minutes), and tended to have less stage 4 (deep) sleep (-33 (-58, 4) minutes). Daytime cognitive performance was worse in the patients with nocturnal asthma, who took a longer time to complete the trail making tests (median difference 62 (22, 75) seconds) and achieved a lower score on the paced serial addition tests (-10 (-24, -3)). Mean daytime sleep latency did not differ significantly between the two groups (2 (-3, 7) minutes). It is concluded that hospital outpatients with stable nocturnal asthma have impaired sleep quality and daytime cognitive performance even when having their usual maintenance asthma treatment.
PMCID: PMC463276  PMID: 1926025
12.  Hepatitis B virus precore mutation and fulminant hepatitis in the United States. A polymerase chain reaction-based assay for the detection of specific mutation. 
Journal of Clinical Investigation  1994;93(2):550-555.
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants with precore mutation(s) resulting in the absence of HBeAg production have been associated with the occurrence of fulminant hepatitis in Japan, Israel, and southern Europe, where the prevalence of this HBV strain appears common. In areas such as United States, where HBV infection is not endemic, the role of this mutant virus in fulminant hepatitis is unknown. We developed an amplification refractory mutation detection system to detect specifically the presence of the G to A mutation at nucleotide position 1898, which is the most frequently observed mutation resulting in a precore stop codon. In addition, this method provided a quantitative measurement of the relative ratio of one strain to the other. Using this system, we tested HBV strains for the presence of the stop codon mutation in sera from 40 cases of fulminant hepatitis B occurring in the United States. Serum HBV DNAs from 28 patients were analyzed successfully. A mixture of wild-type and mutant strains in various ratios were observed in 15 patients, wild type exclusively in 11, and mutant exclusively in 2. Four of these patients had undergone liver transplantation for HBV-associated cirrhosis and developed fulminant HBV-associated hepatitis after transplantation. Pre- and posttransplant serum samples from one patient were analyzed: a mixture of wild-type and mutant HBV strains was detected in both samples. Our study demonstrated that both wild-type and mutant HBV strains are associated with fulminant hepatitis, and that in some patients in the United States, factors other than precore mutations contribute to the development of fulminant hepatitis.
Images
PMCID: PMC293877  PMID: 8113393
13.  Availability and use of hepatitis B vaccine in laboratory and nursing schools in the United States. 
Public Health Reports  1991;106(5):529-535.
Hepatitis B is a well-documented occupational hazard for health care workers, including both laboratory and nursing personnel. Since the development of effective hepatitis B vaccines, the Immunization Practices Advisory Committee (ACIP) has recommended that health care workers receive the vaccine. In this study, 78 laboratory training programs and 83 nursing training programs were surveyed regarding availability and usage of hepatitis B vaccine. The hepatitis B vaccine was made available to students in 81 percent of the laboratory programs and 23 percent of the nursing programs. In those programs making the vaccine available, only 59 percent of the laboratory programs and 5 percent of the nursing programs reported a high (greater than 75 percent) use by students. Concern about cost and payment for the vaccine was the most common reason (80 percent) noted by laboratory schools that did not have hepatitis B vaccination programs for students. Of the nursing schools that did not have vaccine programs, 58 percent had not yet considered a program. At laboratory schools with vaccination programs, who paid for the vaccine (hospital or school versus student) was among the most important determinants for vaccine usage by students. These findings point out that some laboratory schools and many nursing schools have not applied the ACIP recommendations to their own programs. Educational efforts and creative payment plans for the vaccine are needed to increase the availability and use of hepatitis B vaccine among laboratory and nursing students.
PMCID: PMC1580298  PMID: 1832779
14.  Is nocturnal asthma caused by changes in airway cholinergic activity? 
Thorax  1988;43(9):720-724.
A randomised, double blind, placebo controlled crossover trial of high dose nebulised ipratropium was carried out in 10 asthmatic patients with documented nocturnal bronchoconstriction. Patients received nebulised saline or ipratropium 1 mg at 10 pm and 2 am on two nights. Absolute peak flow (PEF) rates were higher throughout the night after the patients had received ipratropium (at 2 am, for example, mean (SEM) PEF was 353 after ipratropium and 285 l/min after placebo). The fall in PEF overnight, however, was similar with ipratropium and placebo. Patients were given a further 1 mg nebulised ipratropium at 6 am on both nights. There was a significant overnight fall in PEF on the ipratropium night even when comparisons were made between the times that maximal cholinergic blockade would be expected, PEF falling between 11.30 pm and 7.30 am from 429 to 369 l/min. The percentage increase in PEF, though not the absolute values, was greater after ipratropium at 6 am than at 10 pm. These results confirm that ipratropium raises PEF throughout the night in asthmatic patients, but suggest that nocturnal bronchoconstriction is not due solely to an increase in airway cholinergic activity at night.
PMCID: PMC461462  PMID: 2973665
15.  Twenty four hour heart rate variability: effects of posture, sleep, and time of day in healthy controls and comparison with bedside tests of autonomic function in diabetic patients. 
British Heart Journal  1991;65(5):239-244.
Heart rate variability was measured in 77 healthy controls and 343 diabetic patients by a count of the number of beat-to-beat differences greater than 50 ms in the RR interval during a 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiogram. In the healthy controls the lower 95% tolerance limits for total 24 hour RR interval counts were approximately 2000 at age 25, 1000 at 45, and 500 at 65 years. Six controls confined to bed after injury had normal 24 hour patterns of RR counts, while eight other controls showed loss of diurnal variation in both heart rate and RR counts during a period of sleep deprivation. RR counts in ten controls on and off night duty increased during sleep whenever it occurred. Nearly half (146) the 343 diabetic patients had abnormal 24 hour RR counts. The percentage of abnormal RR counts increased with increasing autonomic abnormality assessed by a standard battery of tests of cardiovascular autonomic function. A quarter of those with normal cardiovascular reflex tests had abnormal 24 hour RR counts. There were close correlations between 24 hour RR count results and the individual heart rate tests (r = 0.6). The assessment of cardiac parasympathetic activity by 24 hour RR counts was reliable. The diurnal variations in RR counts seen in the controls were probably related to sleep rather than either posture or time of day. The method was more sensitive than conventional tests of cardiovascular reflexes.
PMCID: PMC1024623  PMID: 2039667
17.  Breathing patterns during sleep in patients with nocturnal asthma. 
Thorax  1987;42(8):600-603.
Breathing patterns early and late in the night, at the same sleep stage, were compared in six healthy subjects and 15 adults with nocturnal asthma, to try to identify changes of overnight bronchoconstriction, and breathing patterns at different sleep stages, to see whether there were changes related to sleep stages that were indicative of bronchoconstriction. Despite an average 31% fall in FEV1 overnight in the patients with asthma, neither breathing frequency nor expiratory time, which might be expected to change during bronchoconstriction, was different early in the night from late in the night, nor did they differ between sleep stages. There was no evidence of asynchronous movement of the chest and abdomen in any patient. This study did not identify any abnormality of breathing pattern that would indicate the development of nocturnal asthma without the need to awaken the patient.
PMCID: PMC460860  PMID: 3509951
19.  Ketotifen and nocturnal asthma. 
Thorax  1983;38(11):845-848.
Patients with asthma often wheeze at night and they also become hypoxic during sleep. To determine whether ketotifen, a drug with sedative properties, is safe for use at night in patients with asthma, we performed a double blind crossover study comparing the effects of a single 1 mg dose of ketotifen and of placebo on arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), breathing patterns, electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep stage, and overnight change in FEV1 in 10 patients with stable asthma. After taking ketotifen, the patients slept longer and their sleep was less disturbed than after taking placebo, true sleep occupying 387 (SEM 8) minutes after ketotifen and 336 (19) minutes after placebo (p less than 0.02). On ketotifen nights the patients had less wakefulness and drowsiness (EEG sleep stages 0 and 1) and more non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep than on placebo nights, but the duration of REM sleep was similar on the two occasions. Nocturnal changes in SaO2, the duration of irregular breathing, and overnight change in FEV1 were unaffected by ketotifen.
PMCID: PMC459674  PMID: 6359563
20.  Effect of sleep deprivation on overnight bronchoconstriction in nocturnal asthma. 
Thorax  1986;41(9):676-680.
Nocturnal cough and wheeze are common in asthma. The cause of nocturnal asthma is unknown and there is conflicting evidence on whether sleep is a factor. Twelve adult asthmatic subjects with nocturnal wheeze were studied on two occasions: on one night subjects were allowed to sleep and on the other they were kept awake all night, wakefulness being confirmed by electroencephalogram. Every patient developed bronchoconstriction overnight both on the asleep night, when peak expiratory flow (PEF) fell from a mean (SE) of 418 (40) 1 min-1 at 10 pm to 270 (46) 1 min-1 in the morning, and on the awake night (PEF 10 pm 465 (43), morning 371 (43) 1 min-1). The morning values of PEF were, however, higher (p less than 0.1) after the awake night and both the absolute and the percentage overnight falls in PEF were greater when the patients slept (asleep night 38% (6%), awake night 20% (4%); p less than 0.01). This study suggests that sleep is an important factor in determining overnight bronchoconstriction in patients with nocturnal asthma.
PMCID: PMC460429  PMID: 3787554
21.  Do asthmatics suffer bronchoconstriction during rapid eye movement sleep? 
Many patients with asthma are troubled by nocturnal wheeze. The cause of this symptom is unknown, but sleep is an important factor. A study was carried out to determine whether nocturnal bronchoconstriction is related to any specific stage of sleep. Eight asthmatics with nocturnal wheeze and eight control subjects performed forced expiratory manoeuvres immediately after being woken from rapid eye movement (REM) or non-REM sleep, wakings being timed to differentiate temporal effects from those related to the stage of sleep. The control subjects showed no significant temporal bronchoconstriction or bronchoconstriction related to the stage of sleep. All patients showed bronchoconstriction overnight, the mean peak expiratory flow rate falling from 410 (SEM 50) 1/min before sleep to 186 (49)1/min after sleep. After the patients had been woken from REM sleep the forced expiratory volume in one second was on average 300 ml lower (p less than 0.02) and peak expiratory flow rate 45 1/min lower (p less than 0.03) than after they had been woken from non-REM sleep. As wakenings from REM sleep were 21(8) minutes later in the night than those from non-REM sleep multivariate analysis was performed to differentiate temporal effects from those related to the stage of sleep. This showed that the overnight decreases in forced expiratory volume in one second and peak expiratory flow rate were significantly related both to time and to REM sleep. This study suggests that asthmatics may suffer bronchoconstriction during REM sleep.
Images
PMCID: PMC1340176  PMID: 3085766
22.  Sodium cromoglycate in nocturnal asthma. 
Thorax  1986;41(1):39-41.
To investigate whether mast cell degranulation was important in producing nocturnal asthma, the effect of a single high dose of nebulised sodium cromoglycate on overnight bronchoconstriction, oxygen saturation, and breathing patterns in eight patients with nocturnal wheeze was examined. The study took the form of a double blind placebo controlled crossover comparison. Treatment with cromoglycate did not reduce the overnight fall in FEV1 or FVC, although it was associated with improved nocturnal oxygenation. This study suggests that mast cell degranulation may not be important in the pathogenesis of nocturnal asthma.
PMCID: PMC460250  PMID: 3085257
23.  Physiological changes and sleep responses during and following a world record continuous walking record. 
Physiological changes, and subsequent sleep responses, were recorded in a male subject during and following 338 miles of continuous walking and consequent sleep deprivation. One hundred and thirty hours of walking and a seventy-two hours post-walk recovery period were monitored. The subject walked at approximately 55% of maximum oxygen uptake (VO2 max), heart rate ranged between 102-106 b/min, and blood lactate (LA) remained below the 2 mmol/l level. No electrocardiograph abnormalities were observed either during the walk or pre- and post-functional diagnostic graded exercise test (FDGXT). Creatine kinase (CK) and creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB) levels rose throughout the walk but exhibited differing depletion patterns. The ratio of CK-MB to CK (MB/CK%) did not exceed levels which are suggestive of myocardial ischaemia. Haematological variables demonstrated signs of anaemia towards the end of the walk. Catecholamine levels rose throughout the walk, with greater rises being observed in nor-adrenaline and dopamine. During the post-walk recovery phase, adrenaline concentration remained elevated. Following this extreme period of exertion, the subject demonstrated very short sleep latency and rapid entry into slow wave sleep (SWS). These sleep patterns were compared to sleep recordings made over a similar period (72 h) six months post-walk, when the subject was not exercising. Nocturnal growth hormone (GH) levels were significantly raised on the post-walk nights.
Images
PMCID: PMC1859379  PMID: 6487943
24.  Arterial oxygenation during sleep in patients with right-to-left cardiac or intrapulmonary shunts. 
Thorax  1983;38(5):344-348.
We have studied arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), breathing patterns, and electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep stage during nocturnal sleep in six patients with right-to-left cardiac or intrapulmonary shunts and six patients with chronic bronchitis and emphysema, chosen because they were equally hypoxaemic when awake (SaO2 during wakefulness: bronchitis 74-90%, mean 83%; shunt 77-89%, mean 83%). The patients with bronchitis had far greater falls in SaO2 when asleep than those with shunts (maximum fall in SaO2 during sleep: bronchitis 14-47%, mean 29%; shunt 5-10%, mean 8%; p less than 0.01). Significant episodes of hypoxaemia (defined as SaO2 falls greater than 10%) occurred in all six bronchitic patients, from once to seven times per night, but in none of the patients with shunts (p less than 0.05). Twenty-four of the 27 episodes of hypoxaemia occurred in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep and 24 were associated with hypopnoea. The two groups of patients had similar EEG sleep patterns and the same amount of hypopnoea during sleep. Thus the level of arterial oxygenation when the patient is awake is not the sole determinant of the degree of nocturnal hypoxaemia; the pathological process is also important.
PMCID: PMC459555  PMID: 6879482

Results 1-25 (27)