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1.  Cigarette smoke metabolically promotes cancer, via autophagy and premature aging in the host stromal microenvironment 
Cell Cycle  2013;12(5):818-825.
Cigarette smoke has been directly implicated in the disease pathogenesis of a plethora of different human cancer subtypes, including breast cancers. The prevailing view is that cigarette smoke acts as a mutagen and DNA damaging agent in normal epithelial cells, driving tumor initiation. However, its potential negative metabolic effects on the normal stromal microenvironment have been largely ignored. Here, we propose a new mechanism by which carcinogen-rich cigarette smoke may promote cancer growth, by metabolically “fertilizing” the host microenvironment. More specifically, we show that cigarette smoke exposure is indeed sufficient to drive the onset of the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype via the induction of DNA damage, autophagy and mitophagy in the tumor stroma. In turn, cigarette smoke exposure induces premature aging and mitochondrial dysfunction in stromal fibroblasts, leading to the secretion of high-energy mitochondrial fuels, such as L-lactate and ketone bodies. Hence, cigarette smoke induces catabolism in the local microenvironment, directly fueling oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) in neighboring epithelial cancer cells, actively promoting anabolic tumor growth. Remarkably, these autophagic-senescent fibroblasts increased breast cancer tumor growth in vivo by up to 4-fold. Importantly, we show that cigarette smoke-induced metabolic reprogramming of the fibroblastic stroma occurs independently of tumor neo-angiogenesis. We discuss the possible implications of our current findings for the prevention of aging-associated human diseases and, especially, common epithelial cancers, as we show that cigarette smoke can systemically accelerate aging in the host microenvironment. Finally, our current findings are consistent with the idea that cigarette smoke induces the “reverse Warburg effect,” thereby fueling “two-compartment tumor metabolism” and oxidative mitochondrial metabolism in epithelial cancer cells.
doi:10.4161/cc.23722
PMCID: PMC3610729  PMID: 23388463
carcinogens; cigarette smoke; cancer prevention; autophagy; senescence; premature aging; mitochondrial dysfunction; lactate; ketone bodies; breast cancer; tumor growth; microenvironment
2.  Creating a tumor-resistant microenvironment 
Cell Cycle  2013;12(3):480-490.
Here, we provide the necessary proof of concept, that it is possible to metabolically create a non-permissive or “hostile” stromal microenvironment, which actively prevents tumor engraftment in vivo. We developed a novel genetically engineered fibroblast cell line that completely prevents tumor formation in mice, with a 100% protection rate. No host side effects were apparent. This could represent a viable cellular strategy for preventing and treating a variety of human cancers. More specifically, we examined the autocrine and paracrine effects of the cellular delivery of TNFα on breast cancer tumor growth and cancer metabolism. For this purpose, we recombinantly overexpressed TNFα in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) or human immortalized fibroblasts (hTERT-BJ1). Our results directly show that TNFα functions as a potent tumor suppressor. Remarkably, TNFα-expressing breast cancer cells were viable, without any significant increases in their basal apoptotic rate. However, after 4 weeks post-implantation, TNFα-expressing breast cancer cells failed to form any tumors in xenografted mice (0 tumors/10 injections), ultimately conferring 100% protection against tumorigenesis. Similarly, TNFα-overexpressing fibroblasts were also viable, without any increases in apoptosis. Significantly, complete tumor suppression was obtained by co-injecting TNFα expressing stromal fibroblasts with human breast cancer cells, indicating that paracrine cell-mediated delivery of TNFα can also prevent tumor engraftment and growth (0 tumors/10 injections). Mechanistically, TNFα induced autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in both epithelial cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts, preventing energy transfer from the tumor microenvironment, likely “starving” the cancer cells to death. In addition, via qRT-PCR analysis of MDA-MB-231 cells, we observed that TNFα mediated the upregulation of gene transcripts associated with inflammation and senescence [IL-1-β, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, COX-2, p21(WAF1/CIP1)] and downregulated known tumor-promoting genes (collagen VI and MMP2). Recombinant overexpression of TNFα receptor(s) in MDA-MB-231 cells also significantly reduced tumor growth, but was not as effective as the TNFα ligand itself in preventing tumor growth. Thus, we propose that stromal cell-mediated delivery of TNFα to human tumors [using transfected fibroblasts or mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs)] may be a novel and effective strategy for the prevention and treatment of human cancers.
doi:10.4161/cc.23370
PMCID: PMC3587449  PMID: 23292149
tumor necrosis factor (TNF); cancer prevention; cellular therapy; fibroblast mediated delivery; mitochondrial dysfunction; breast cancer; tumor growth; tumor cell engraftment; autophagy; apoptosis
3.  Mitochondria “fuel” breast cancer metabolism: Fifteen markers of mitochondrial biogenesis label epithelial cancer cells, but are excluded from adjacent stromal cells 
Cell Cycle  2012;11(23):4390-4401.
Here, we present new genetic and morphological evidence that human tumors consist of two distinct metabolic compartments. First, re-analysis of genome-wide transcriptional profiling data revealed that > 95 gene transcripts associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation were significantly elevated in human breast cancer cells, as compared with adjacent stromal tissue. Remarkably, nearly 40 of these upregulated gene transcripts were mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs), functionally associated with mitochondrial translation of protein components of the OXPHOS complex. Second, during validation by immunohistochemistry, we observed that antibodies directed against 15 markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation (AKAP1, GOLPH3, GOLPH3L, MCT1, MRPL40, MRPS7, MRPS15, MRPS22, NRF1, NRF2, PGC1-α, POLRMT, TFAM, TIMM9 and TOMM70A) selectively labeled epithelial breast cancer cells. These same mitochondrial markers were largely absent or excluded from adjacent tumor stromal cells. Finally, markers of mitochondrial lipid synthesis (GOLPH3) and mitochondrial translation (POLRMT) were associated with poor clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. Thus, we conclude that human breast cancers contain two distinct metabolic compartments—a glycolytic tumor stroma, which surrounds oxidative epithelial cancer cells—that are mitochondria-rich. The co-existence of these two compartments is indicative of metabolic symbiosis between epithelial cancer cells and their surrounding stroma. As such, epithelial breast cancer cells should be viewed as predatory metabolic “parasites,” which undergo anabolic reprogramming to amplify their mitochondrial “power.” This notion is consistent with the observation that the anti-malarial agent chloroquine may be an effective anticancer agent. New anticancer therapies should be developed to target mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation in human cancer cells.
doi:10.4161/cc.22777
PMCID: PMC3552922  PMID: 23172368
two-compartment tumor metabolism; mitochondria; oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS); mitochondrial biogenesis; mitochondrial translation; cancer metabolism; metabolic reprogramming
4.  Downregulation of stromal BRCA1 drives breast cancer tumor growth via upregulation of HIF-1α, autophagy and ketone body production 
Cell Cycle  2012;11(22):4167-4173.
Our recent studies have mechanistically demonstrated that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) produce energy-rich metabolites that functionally support the growth of cancer cells. Also, several authors have demonstrated that DNA instability in the tumor stroma greatly contributes to carcinogenesis. To further test this hypothesis, we stably knocked-down BRCA1 expression in human hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts (shBRCA1) using an shRNA lentiviral approach. As expected, shBRCA1 fibroblasts displayed an elevated growth rate. Using immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis, shBRCA1 fibroblasts demonstrated an increase in markers of autophagy and mitophagy. Most notably, shBRCA1 fibroblasts also displayed an elevation of HIF-1α expression. In accordance with these findings, shBRCA1 fibroblasts showed a 5.5-fold increase in ketone body production; ketone bodies function as high-energy mitochondrial fuels. This is consistent with the onset of mitochondrial dysfunction in BRCA1-deficient fibroblasts. Conversely, after 48 h of co-culturing shBRCA1 fibroblasts with a human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231 cell), mitochondrial activity was enhanced in these epithelial cancer cells. Interestingly, our preclinical studies using xenografts demonstrated that shBRCA1 fibroblasts induced an ~2.2-fold increase in tumor growth when co-injected with MDA-MB-231 cells into nude mice. We conclude that a BRCA1 deficiency in the tumor stroma metabolically promotes cancer progression, via ketone production.
doi:10.4161/cc.22316
PMCID: PMC3524212  PMID: 23047605
BRCA1; cancer metabolism; stromal fibroblasts; ketone bodies; HIF1; mitochondrial OXPHOS; autophagy; mitophagy
5.  Mitochondrial biogenesis in epithelial cancer cells promotes breast cancer tumor growth and confers autophagy resistance 
Cell Cycle  2012;11(22):4174-4180.
Here, we set out to test the novel hypothesis that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in epithelial cancer cells would “fuel” enhanced tumor growth. For this purpose, we generated MDA-MB-231 cells (a triple-negative human breast cancer cell line) overexpressing PGC-1α and MitoNEET, which are established molecules that drive mitochondrial biogenesis and increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Interestingly, both PGC-1α and MitoNEET increased the abundance of OXPHOS protein complexes, conferred autophagy resistance under conditions of starvation and increased tumor growth by up to ~3-fold. However, this increase in tumor growth was independent of neo-angiogenesis, as assessed by immunostaining and quantitation of vessel density using CD31 antibodies. Quantitatively similar increases in tumor growth were also observed by overexpression of PGC-1β and POLRMT in MDA-MB-231 cells, which are also responsible for mediating increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, we propose that increased mitochondrial “power” in epithelial cancer cells oncogenically promotes tumor growth by conferring autophagy resistance. As such, PGC-1α, PGC-1β, mitoNEET and POLRMT should all be considered as tumor promoters or “metabolic oncogenes.” Our results are consistent with numerous previous clinical studies showing that metformin (a weak mitochondrial “poison”) prevents the onset of nearly all types of human cancers in diabetic patients. Therefore, metformin (a complex I inhibitor) and other mitochondrial inhibitors should be developed as novel anticancer therapies, targeting mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells.
doi:10.4161/cc.22376
PMCID: PMC3524213  PMID: 23070475
cancer metabolism; mitochondrial biogenesis; oxidative phosphorylation; OXPHOS; autophagy resistance; angiogenesis; two-compartment tumor metabolism
6.  Caveolin-1 promotes pancreatic cancer cell differentiation and restores membranous E-cadherin via suppression of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition 
Cell Cycle  2011;10(21):3692-3700.
Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers due to early rapid metastasis and chemoresistance. Recently, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) was shown to play a key role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. To understand the role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in EMT, we overexpressed Cav-1 in a pancreatic cancer cell line, Panc 10.05, that does not normally express Cav-1. Here, we show that Cav-1 expression in pancreatic cancer cells induces an epithelial phenotype and promotes cell-cell contact, with increased expression of plasma membrane bound E-cadherin and β-catenin. Mechanistically, Cav-1 induces Snail downregulation and decreased activation of AKT, MAPK and TGFβ-Smad signaling pathways. In vitro, Cav-1 expression reduces cell migration and invasion, and attenuates doxorubicin-chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer cells. Importantly, in vivo studies revealed that Cav-1 expression greatly suppresses tumor formation in a xenograft model. Most interestingly, Panc/Cav-1 tumors displayed organized nests of differentiated cells that were totally absent in control tumors. Confirming our in vitro results, these nests of differentiated cells showed reexpression of E-cadherin and β-catenin at the cell membrane. Thus, we provide evidence that Cav-1 functions as a crucial modulator of EMT and cell differentiation in pancreatic cancer.
doi:10.4161/cc.10.21.17895
PMCID: PMC3266007  PMID: 22041584
caveolae; caveolin-1; epithelial-mesenchymal transition; E-cadherin; pancreatic cancer; cell differentiation; chemoresistance

Results 1-6 (6)