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1.  Adhesive Intestinal Obstruction in Infants and Children: The Place of Conservative Treatment 
ISRN Surgery  2011;2011:645104.
Objectives. Adhesive intestinal obstruction (AIO) is rare in the pediatric age group and its treatment is still controversial. This is a retrospective review of our experience in infants and children with AIO. Patients and Methods. The records of infants and children with AIO between January 2001 and December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed for age at diagnosis, sex, initial operation, interval between initial operation and presentation, diagnosis, treatment and outcome. Results. 44 infants and children were admitted with AIO. There were 28 males and 16 females who had 46 episodes. Their ages at presentation ranged from 1 month to 12 years (mean 5.4 years), while their ages at initial operation ranged from 2 days to 12 years (mean 4.15 years). Time elapsed from initial operation to presentation ranged from 7 days to 8 years (mean 1.5 years), and 66% developed AIO within 1 year from initial operation. Appenedecectomy was the commonest operation (29.5%). Four (9%) responded to conservative treatment. The other 40 (91%) required surgical intervention. Twenty-nine had release of adhesions only, while 10 (25%) had resection of small intestines and one underwent stricturoplasty. Two developed recurrence and one died. Conclusions. AIO is rare in the pediatric age group and the majority becomes symptomatic within 1 year of operation. Appendecectomy is the commonest operation leading to AIO. The place of conservative treatment is limited and to obviate delay and decrease the chance of intestinal ischemia, they should be treated early with surgical adhesiolysis.
doi:10.5402/2011/645104
PMCID: PMC3200142  PMID: 22084769
2.  Two Unusual Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies 
ISRN Surgery  2011;2011:187343.
Swallowed foreign bodies are common in the pediatric age group, but fortunately, the majority of them pass spontaneously without any adverse effects. Tube gastrostomy is an excellent method to provide prolonged enteral feeding. It is, however, associated with complications, namely, intraperitoneal leak and distal migration of the gastrostomy tube causing gastric outlet obstruction. This paper describes two unusual gastrointestinal foreign bodies, one was swallowed, while the other one was a complication of a tube gastrostomy.
doi:10.5402/2011/187343
PMCID: PMC3195853  PMID: 22084747
3.  Congenital Paraesophageal Hernia with Intrathoracic Gastric Volvolus in Two Sisters 
ISRN Surgery  2011;2011:856568.
Congenital paraesophageal hernia is rare in infants and children. This paper describes our experience with seven infants and children with congenital paraesophageal hernia with emphasis on two sisters who presented with unusually large paraesophageal hernias and herniation of most of the stomach resulting in intrathoracic gastric volvolus. The literature on the subject is also reviewed.
doi:10.5402/2011/856568
PMCID: PMC3201063  PMID: 22084782
4.  Splenic Complications of Sickle Cell Anemia and the Role of Splenectomy 
ISRN Hematology  2010;2011:864257.
Sickle cell disease is one of the common hemoglobinopathies in the world. It can affect any part of the body and one of the most common and an early organ to be affected in SCA is the spleen. It is commonly enlarged during the first decade of life but then undergoes progressive atrophy leading to autosplenectomy. This however is not the case always and sometimes splenomegaly persist necessitating splenectomy for a variety of reasons including acute splenic sequestration crisis, hypersplenism, massive splenic infarction and splenic abscess. Splenic complications of SCA are known to be associated with an increased morbidity and in some it may lead to mortality. To obviate this, splenectomy becomes an essential part of their management. This review is based on our experience in the management of 173 children with various splenic complications of SCA necessitating splenectomy.
doi:10.5402/2011/864257
PMCID: PMC3200071  PMID: 22084706

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