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1.  The Correlation Between Lipid Profile and Stress Levels in Central Iran: Isfahan Healthy Heart Program 
ARYA Atherosclerosis  2010;6(3):102-106.
BACKGROUND
Previous studies suggest that mental status may influence serum lipid levels. This study was conducted on adult population living in rural and urban areas in Central Iran to assess the correlation between stress level and lipid profile disorders.
METHODS
Data was extracted from final evaluation of Isfahan Healthy Heart Program (IHHP) in 2008. Multistage and random cluster methods were used for sampling. The study population consisted of 9752 adults aged ≥19 years living in three districts namely Isfahan, Arak and Najaf Abad. Demographic data, age and sex were recorded. Blood samples were taken to determine the lipid levels including total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides. Stress levels were assessed using the General Health Questionnaire. Logistic regression and chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis.
RESULTS
The odds ratios of high stress in individuals with high levels of TC, LDL-C and low levels of HDL-C compared to normal individuals after adjustment for age and sex were as follows respectively: 1.05 (1.02,1.15), 1.06 (1.02,1.18), 1.06 (1.01,1.17).
CONCLUSION
Intervention activities towards reduction of stress levels at the community level may be useful as part of the strategy for cardiovascular disease prevention.
PMCID: PMC3347824  PMID: 22577424
Cholesterol; Triglycerides; Stress; Adult
2.  The Relationship Between Ankle-Brachial Index and Number of Involved Coronaries in Patients with Stable Angina 
ARYA Atherosclerosis  2010;6(1):6-10.
BACKGROUND
Atherosclerosis is the commonest cause of vascular disease which can involve peripheral and/or cardiac vessels. This study was conducted to evaluate the possible link between Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) and coronary vessel involvement in patients with stable angina.
METHODS
This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008 on 120 individuals who were hospitalized in Chamran Heart Center and underwent coronary angiography. A questionnaire was completed to obtain demographic information, history of previous heart disease and smoking. Body height and weight, as blood pressure on hand and foot were measured. The patients underwent angiography and the extent of coronary involvement (> 75%) was determined. After12-14-hour of fasting, blood sugar was obtained to measure total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). The Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABI) was calculated as the ratio of the blood pressure in the ankles to the blood pressure in the arms. The data were analyzed by SPSS-15 using ANOVA, T-Student test, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, and discriminant analysis.
RESULTS
Samples were 46 women (38.33%) and 74 men (61.67%) with a mean age of 55.50 ± 10.49. Mean and SD of ABI in men and women was 0.72 ± 0.20 and 0.80 ± 0.19 with no significant difference (P=0.012). The correlation between ABI and extent of coronary involvement was 0.47 (P < 0.0001). The group with lower ABI had the highest levels of coronary involvement (triple vessel, P < 0.05).
CONCLUSION
ABI had a significant relationship with the degree of coronary involvement and a significant predictive value. Therefore ABI seems to be a reliable indicator of high coronary risk.
PMCID: PMC3347808  PMID: 22577406
Ankle to brachial index; Coronary involvement; Stable angina
3.  Is there any Relationship Between C-Reactive Protein Level and Complex Coronary Plaques in Patients with Unstable Angina? 
ARYA Atherosclerosis  2010;6(1):31-34.
BACKGROUND
Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of death in developed countries. On the other hand, increased level of CRP has been seen in atherosclerosis. According to this finding, we decided to conduct this study to assess the relationship between CRP and complex lesions of coronary arteries in patients with unstable angina.
METHODS
In this analytical cross sectional study which was conducted in 2007 in Chamran hospital, samples were collected using simple sampling and included 80 patients who referred to the hospital due to angina pectoris, had the diagnosis of unstable angina and were candidates of angiography. At first, a questionnaire was filled for each patient including demographic factors and their medical history. Then a blood sample was taken to assess level of CRP, FBS, and lipid profiles. The results of angiographic studies were considered by three cardiologists and abnormal patients were classified into simple and complex groups according to Ambrose criteria. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 15, t-student and chi-square tests.
RESULTS
Mean age of samples was 58.27 ± 6.23 years old. Considering the risk factors, most simple and complex lesions happened in obese patients however the only significant difference was observed in BMI between two groups (P < 0.05). Mean level of CRP in the population under study was 6.05 ± 4 mg/dl which was 1.37 ± 2 and 8.01 ± 6 in simple and complex groups respectively (P < 0.05). CRP mean was significantly higher in the group with complex lesions, less than 1 mg/dl in simple lesion and more than 4 mg/dl in complex lesions.
CONCLUSION
According to our findings, there is a significant difference considering CRP level in unstable angina patients who have complex lesions compared with simples ones. As complex plaques are more susceptible to develop coronary events, patients with a higher probability of complicated lesions can be screened.
PMCID: PMC3347811  PMID: 22577410
CRP; Simple and complex lesion; Unstable angina; Angiography

Results 1-3 (3)