PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-1 (1)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Relationship between depression and apolipoproteins A and B: a case–control study 
Clinics  2011;66(1):113-117.
OBJECTIVE:
To investigate the relation between major depressive disorder and metabolic risk factors of coronary heart disease.
INTRODUCTION:
Little evidence is available indicating a relationship between major depressive disorder and metabolic risk factors of coronary heart disease such as lipoprotein and apolipoprotein.
METHODS:
This case–control study included 153 patients with major depressive disorder who fulfilled the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM‐IV), and 147 healthy individuals. All participants completed a demographic questionnaire and Hamilton rating scale for depression. Anthropometric characteristics were recorded. Blood samples were taken and total cholesterol, high‐ and low‐density lipoproteins and apolipoproteins A and B were measured. To analyze the data, t‐test, χ2 test, Pearson correlation test and linear regression were applied.
RESULTS:
Depression was a negative predictor of apolipoprotein A (β = −0.328, p<0.01) and positive predictor of apolipoprotein B (β = 0.290, p<0.05). Apolipoprotein A was inversely predicted by total cholesterol (β = −0.269, p<0.05) and positively predicted by high‐density lipoprotein (β = 0.401, p<0.01). Also, low‐density lipoprotein was a predictor of apolipoprotein B (β = 0.340, p<0.01). The severity of depression was correlated with the increment in serum apolipoprotein B levels and the decrement in serum apolipoprotein A level.
CONCLUSION:
In view of the relationship between apolipoproteins A and B and depression, it would seem that screening of these metabolic risk factors besides psychological interventions is necessary in depressed patients.
doi:10.1590/S1807-59322011000100020
PMCID: PMC3044579  PMID: 21437446
Coronary risk factors; Coronary heart disease; Major depression

Results 1-1 (1)