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1.  WEEKLY RUNNING VOLUME AND RISK OF RUNNING‐RELATED INJURIES AMONG MARATHON RUNNERS 
Purpose/Background:
The purpose of this study was to investigate if the risk of injury declines with increasing weekly running volume before a marathon race.
Methods:
The study was a retrospective cohort study on marathon finishers. Following a marathon, participants completed a web‐based questionnaire. The outcome of interest was a self‐reported running‐related injury. The injury had to be severe enough to cause a reduction in distance, speed, duration or frequency of running for at least 14 days. Primary exposure was self‐reported average weekly volume of running before the marathon categorized into below 30 km/week, 30 to 60 km/week, and above 60 km/week.
Results:
A total of 68 of the 662 respondents sustained an injury. When adjusting for previous injury and previous marathons, the relative risk (RR) of suffering an injury rose by 2.02 [95% CI: 1.26; 3.24], p < 0.01, among runners with an average weekly training volume below 30 km/week compared with runners with an average weekly training volume of 30‐60 km/week. No significant differences were found between runners exceeding 60 km/week and runners running 30‐60 km/week (RR=1.13 [0.5;2.8], p=0.80).
Conclusions:
Runners may be advised to run a minimum of 30 km/week before a marathon to reduce their risk of running‐related injury.
Level of Evidence:
2b
PMCID: PMC3625790  PMID: 23593549
Running‐related injury; marathon; risk factors; running volume.
2.  CLASSIFYING RUNNING‐RELATED INJURIES BASED UPON ETIOLOGY, WITH EMPHASIS ON VOLUME AND PACE 
Background and Purpose:
Many researchers acknowledge the importance of “training errors” as the main cause of running‐related injuries. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to present a theoretical framework for the assumption that some running‐related injuries among rear‐foot strikers develop due to rapidly changing running volume, while others develop due to rapidly changing running pace.
Description of Topic with Related Evidence:
Evidence from clinical and experimental studies is presented to support the assertion that rapid change in running volume may lead to the development of patellofemoral pain syndrome, iliotibial band syndrome, and patellar tendinopathy, while change in running pace may be associated with the development of achilles tendinopathy, gastrocnemius injuries, and plantar fasciitis.
Discussion/Relation to Clinical Practice:
If this assertion is correct, bias may be prevented in future studies by categorizing injuries into volume or pacing injuries. However, more work is needed to provide further evidence in support of this approach. Future investigations of the link between training patterns and injury development should be designed as large‐scale prospective studies using objective methods to quantify training patterns.
Level of evidence:
5
PMCID: PMC3625796  PMID: 23593555
Etiology; running pace; running‐related injury; training volume
3.  TRAINING ERRORS AND RUNNING RELATED INJURIES: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW 
Purpose:
The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the link between training characteristics (volume, duration, frequency, and intensity) and running related injuries.
Methods:
A systematic search was performed in PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and SportDiscus. Studies were included if they examined novice, recreational, or elite runners between the ages of 18 and 65. Exposure variables were training characteristics defined as volume, distance or mileage, time or duration, frequency, intensity, speed or pace, or similar terms. The outcome of interest was Running Related Injuries (RRI) in general or specific RRI in the lower extremity or lower back. Methodological quality was evaluated using quality assessment tools of 11 to 16 items.
Results:
After examining 4561 titles and abstracts, 63 articles were identified as potentially relevant. Finally, nine retrospective cohort studies, 13 prospective cohort studies, six case-control studies, and three randomized controlled trials were included. The mean quality score was 44.1%. Conflicting results were reported on the relationships between volume, duration, intensity, and frequency and RRI.
Conclusion:
It was not possible to identify which training errors were related to running related injuries. Still, well supported data on which training errors relate to or cause running related injuries is highly important for determining proper prevention strategies. If methodological limitations in measuring training variables can be resolved, more work can be conducted to define training and the interactions between different training variables, create several hypotheses, test the hypotheses in a large scale prospective study, and explore cause and effect relationships in randomized controlled trials.
Level of evidence:
2a
PMCID: PMC3290924  PMID: 22389869
Duration; frequency; injuries; intensity; running; training; volume

Results 1-3 (3)