PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-2 (2)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Impairment of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 increases accumulation of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in the esophagus after ethanol ingestion 
Ethanol and its metabolite, acetaldehyde, are the definite carcinogens for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), and reduced catalytic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), which detoxifies acetaldehyde, increases the risk for ESCC. However, it remains unknown whether the ALDH2 genotype influences the level of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage in the esophagus after ethanol ingestion. In the present study, we administered ethanol orally or intraperitoneally to Aldh2-knockout and control mice, and we quantified the level of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage, especially N2-ethylidene-2’-deoxyguanosine (N2-ethylidene-dG), in the esophagus. In the model of oral ethanol administration, the esophageal N2-ethylidene-dG level was significantly higher in Aldh2-knockout mice compared with control mice. Similarly, in the model of intraperitoneal ethanol administration, in which the esophagus is not exposed directly to the alcohol solution, the esophageal N2-ethylidene-dG level was also elevated in Aldh2-knockout mice. This result indicates that circulating ethanol-derived acetaldehyde causes esophageal DNA damage, and that the extent of damage is influenced by knockout of Aldh2. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest the importance of acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage which is induced in the esophagus of individuals with ALDH2 gene impairment. This provides a physiological basis for understanding alcohol-related esophageal carcinogenesis.
PMCID: PMC4065408  PMID: 24959382
Carcinogenesis; esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; acetaldehyde; acetaldehyde-derived DNA damage; DNA adduct
2.  Notch receptor inhibition reveals the importance of cyclin D1 and Wnt signaling in invasive esophageal squamous cell carcinoma 
Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most aggressive forms of squamous cell carcinomas. Common genetic lesions in ESCC include p53 mutations and EGFR overexpression, both of which have been implicated in negative regulation of Notch signaling. In addition, cyclin D1 is overexpressed in ESCC and can be activated via EGFR, Notch and Wnt signaling. To elucidate how these genetic lesions may interact during the development and progression of ESCC, we tested a panel of genetically engineered human esophageal cells (keratinocytes) in organotypic 3D culture (OTC), a form of human tissue engineering. Notch signaling was suppressed in culture and mice by dominant negative Mastermind-like1 (DNMAML1), a genetic pan-Notch inhibitor. DNMAML1 mice were subjected to 4-Nitroquinoline 1-oxide-induced oral-esophageal carcinogenesis. Highly invasive characteristics of primary human ESCC were recapitulated in OTC as well as DNMAML1 mice. In OTC, cyclin D1 overexpression induced squamous hyperplasia. Concurrent EGFR overexpression and mutant p53 resulted in transformation and invasive growth. Interestingly, cell proliferation appeared to be regulated differentially between those committed to squamous-cell differentiation and those invading into the stroma. Invasive cells exhibited Notch-independent activation of cyclin D1 and Wnt signaling. Within the oral-esophageal squamous epithelia, Notch signaling regulated squamous-cell differentiation to maintain epithelial integrity, and thus may act as a tumor suppressor by preventing the development of a tumor-promoting inflammatory microenvironment.
PMCID: PMC3410579  PMID: 22860235
Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; organotypic 3D culture; EGFR; P53; cyclin D1; Wnt; Notch; squamous-cell differentiation; invasion; 4-Nitroquinoline 1-oxide

Results 1-2 (2)