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1.  Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease in man 
Chambers, John C | Zhang, Weihua | Lord, Graham M | van der Harst, Pim | Lawlor, Debbie A | Sehmi, Joban S | Gale, Daniel P | Wass, Mark N | Ahmadi, Kourosh R | Bakker, Stephan JL | Beckmann, Jacqui | Bilo, Henk JG | Bochud, Murielle | Brown, Morris J | Caulfield, Mark J | Connell, John M C | Cook, Terence | Cotlarciuc, Ioana | Smith, George Davey | de Silva, Ranil | Deng, Guohong | Devuyst, Olivier | Dikkeschei, Lambert D. | Dimkovic, Nada | Dockrell, Mark | Dominiczak, Anna | Ebrahim, Shah | Eggermann, Thomas | Farrall, Martin | Ferrucci, Luigi | Floege, Jurgen | Forouhi, Nita G | Gansevoort, Ron T | Han, Xijin | Hedblad, Bo | van der Heide, Jaap J Homan | Hepkema, Bouke G | Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria | Hypponen, Elina | Johnson, Toby | de Jong, Paul E | Kleefstra, Nanne | Lagou, Vasiliki | Lapsley, Marta | Li, Yun | Loos, Ruth J F | Luan, Jian'an | Luttropp, Karin | Maréchal, Céline | Melander, Olle | Munroe, Patricia B | Nordfors, Louise | Parsa, Afshin | Penninx, Brenda W. | Perucha, Esperanza | Pouta, Anneli | Prokopenko, Inga | Roderick, Paul J | Ruokonen, Aimo | Samani, Nilesh | Sanna, Serena | Schalling, Martin | Schlessinger, David | Schlieper, Georg | Seelen, Marc AJ | Shuldiner, Alan R | Sjögren, Marketa | Smit, Johannes H. | Snieder, Harold | Soranzo, Nicole | Spector, Timothy D | Stenvinkel, Peter | Sternberg, Michael JE | Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer | Tanaka, Toshiko | Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J. | Uda, Manuela | Vollenweider, Peter | Wallace, Chris | Waterworth, Dawn | Zerres, Klaus | Waeber, Gerard | Wareham, Nicholas J | Maxwell, Patrick H | McCarthy, Mark I | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Mooser, Vincent | Abecasis, Goncalo R | Lightstone, Liz | Scott, James | Navis, Gerjan | Elliott, Paul | Kooner., Jaspal S
Nature genetics  2010;42(5):373-375.
Chronic kidney disease (CKD), the result of permanent loss of kidney function, is a major global problem. We identify common genetic variants at chr2p12-p13, chr6q26, chr17q23 and chr19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P=10−10 to 10−15). SNPs rs10206899 (near NAT8, chr2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, chr19q13) were also associated with CKD. Our findings provide new insight into metabolic, solute and drug-transport pathways underlying susceptibility to CKD.
doi:10.1038/ng.566
PMCID: PMC3748585  PMID: 20383145
2.  Genome-Wide Association Scan Allowing for Epistasis in Type 2 Diabetes 
Annals of human genetics  2010;75(1):10-19.
Summary
In the presence of epistasis multilocus association tests of human complex traits can provide powerful methods to detect susceptibility variants. We undertook multilocus analyses in 1924 type 2 diabetes cases and 2938 controls from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). We performed a two-dimensional genome-wide association (GWA) scan using joint two-locus tests of association including main and epistatic effects in 70,236 markers tagging common variants. We found two-locus association at 79 SNP-pairs at a Bonferroni-corrected P-value = 0.05 (uncorrected P-value = 2.14 × 10−11). The 79 pair-wise results always contained rs11196205 in TCF7L2 paired with 79 variants including confirmed variants in FTO, TSPAN8, and CDKAL1, which are associated in the absence of epistasis. However, the majority (82%) of the 79 variants did not have compelling single-locus association signals (P-value = 5 × 10−4). Analyses conditional on the single-locus effects at TCF7L2 established that the joint two-locus results could be attributed to single-locus association at TCF7L2 alone. Interaction analyses among the peak 80 regions and among 23 previously established diabetes candidate genes identified five SNP-pairs with case-control and case-only epistatic signals. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of systematic scans in GWA data, but confirm that single-locus association can underlie and obscure multilocus findings.
doi:10.1111/j.1469-1809.2010.00629.x
PMCID: PMC3430851  PMID: 21133856
Epistasis; simultaneous search; joint effects; genome-wide association
4.  Assessment of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Levels as Diagnostic Discriminator of Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young Due to HNF1A Mutations 
Diabetes Care  2010;33(9):1919-1924.
OBJECTIVE
Despite the clinical importance of an accurate diagnosis in individuals with monogenic forms of diabetes, restricted access to genetic testing leaves many patients with undiagnosed diabetes. Recently, common variation near the HNF1 homeobox A (HNF1A) gene was shown to influence C-reactive protein levels in healthy adults. We hypothesized that serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) could represent a clinically useful biomarker for the identification of HNF1A mutations causing maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY).
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
Serum hs-CRP was measured in subjects with HNF1A-MODY (n = 31), autoimmune diabetes (n = 316), type 2 diabetes (n = 240), and glucokinase (GCK) MODY (n = 24) and in nondiabetic individuals (n = 198). The discriminative accuracy of hs-CRP was evaluated through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and performance was compared with standard diagnostic criteria. Our primary analyses excluded ∼11% of subjects in whom the single available hs-CRP measurement was >10 mg/l.
RESULTS
Geometric mean (SD range) hs-CRP levels were significantly lower (P ≤ 0.009) for HNF1A-MODY individuals, 0.20 (0.03–1.14) mg/l, than for any other group: autoimmune diabetes 0.58 (0.10–2.75) mg/l, type 2 diabetes 1.33 (0.28–6.14) mg/l, GCK-MODY 1.01 (0.19–5.33) mg/l, and nondiabetic 0.48 (0.10–2.42) mg/l. The ROC-derived C-statistic for discriminating HNF1A-MODY and type 2 diabetes was 0.8. Measurement of hs-CRP, either alone or in combination with current diagnostic criteria, was superior to current diagnostic criteria alone. Sensitivity and specificity for the combined criteria approached 80%.
CONCLUSIONS
Serum hs-CRP levels are markedly lower in HNF1A-MODY than in other forms of diabetes. hs-CRP has potential as a widely available, cost-effective screening test to support more precise targeting of MODY diagnostic testing.
doi:10.2337/dc10-0288
PMCID: PMC2928334  PMID: 20724646
5.  Common variants near ATM are associated with glycemic response to metformin in type 2 diabetes 
Nature genetics  2010;43(2):117-120.
Metformin is the most commonly used pharmacological therapy for type 2 diabetes. We carried out a GWA study on glycaemic response to metformin in 1024 Scottish patients with type 2 diabetes. Replication was in two cohorts consisting of 1783 Scottish patients and 1113 patients from the UK Prospective Diabetes Study. In a meta-analysis (n=3920) we observed an association (P=2.9 *10−9) for a SNP rs11212617 at a locus containing the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene with an odds ratio of 1.35 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.49) for treatment success. In a rat hepatoma cell line, inhibition of ATM with KU-55933 attenuated the phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in response to metformin. We conclude that ATM, a gene known to be involved in DNA repair and cell cycle control, plays a role in the effect of metformin upstream of AMPK, and variation in this gene alters glycaemic response to metformin.
doi:10.1038/ng.735
PMCID: PMC3030919  PMID: 21186350
6.  Common genetic determinants of vitamin D insufficiency: a genome-wide association study 
Wang, Thomas J. | Zhang, Feng | Richards, J. Brent | Kestenbaum, Bryan | van Meurs, Joyce B. | Berry, Diane | Kiel, Douglas | Streeten, Elizabeth A. | Ohlsson, Claes | Koller, Daniel L. | Palotie, Leena | Cooper, Jason D. | O'Reilly, Paul F. | Houston, Denise K. | Glazer, Nicole L. | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Peacock, Munro | Shi, Julia | Rivadeneira, Fernando | McCarthy, Mark I. | Anneli, Pouta | de Boer, Ian H. | Mangino, Massimo | Kato, Bernet | Smyth, Deborah J. | Booth, Sarah L. | Jacques, Paul F. | Burke, Greg L. | Goodarzi, Mark | Cheung, Ching-Lung | Wolf, Myles | Rice, Kenneth | Goltzman, David | Hidiroglou, Nick | Ladouceur, Martin | Hui, Siu L. | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Hocking, Lynne J. | Hart, Deborah | Arden, Nigel K. | Cooper, Cyrus | Malik, Suneil | Fraser, William D. | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Zhai, Guangju | Macdonald, Helen | Forouhi, Nita G. | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Reid, David M. | Hakim, Alan | Dennison, Elaine | Liu, Yongmei | Power, Chris | Stevens, Helen E. | Jaana, Laitinen | Vasan, Ramachandran S. | Soranzo, Nicole | Bojunga, Jörg | Psaty, Bruce M. | Lorentzon, Mattias | Foroud, Tatiana | Harris, Tamara B. | Hofman, Albert | Jansson, John-Olov | Cauley, Jane A. | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | Gibson, Quince | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Karasik, David | Siscovick, David S. | Econs, Michael J. | Kritchevsky, Stephen B. | Florez, Jose C. | Todd, John A. | Dupuis, Josee | Hypponen, Elina | Spector, Timothy D.
Lancet  2010;376(9736):180-188.
Background
Vitamin D is crucial for maintaining musculoskeletal health. Recently, vitamin D insufficiency has been linked to a number of extraskeletal disorders, including diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Determinants of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) include sun exposure and dietary intake, but its high heritability suggests that genetic determinants may also play a role.
Methods
We performed a genome-wide association study of 25-OH D among ∼30,000 individuals of European descent from 15 cohorts. Five cohorts were designated as discovery cohorts (n=16,125), five as in silico replication cohorts (n=9,366), and five as de novo replication cohorts (n=8,378). Association results were combined using z-score-weighted meta-analysis. Vitamin D insufficiency was defined as 25-OH D <75 nmol/L or <50 nmol/L.
Findings
Variants at three loci reached genome-wide significance in the discovery cohorts, and were confirmed in the replication cohorts: 4p12 (overall P=1.9 × 10-109 for rs2282679, in GC); 11q12 (P=2.1 × 10-27 for rs12785878, near DHCR7); 11p15 (P=3.3 × 10-20 for rs10741657, near CYP2R1). Variants at an additional locus (20q13, CYP24A1) were genome-wide significant in the pooled sample (P=6.0 × 10-10 for rs6013897). A genotype score was constructed using the three confirmed variants. Those in the top quartile of genotype scores had 2- to 2.5-fold elevated odds of vitamin D insufficiency (P≤1 × 10-26).
Interpretation
Variants near genes involved in cholesterol synthesis (DHCR7), hydroxylation (CYP2R1, CYP24A1), and vitamin D transport (GC) influence vitamin D status. Genetic variation at these loci identifies individuals of European descent who have substantially elevated risk of vitamin D insufficiency.
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)60588-0
PMCID: PMC3086761  PMID: 20541252
7.  Detailed Physiologic Characterization Reveals Diverse Mechanisms for Novel Genetic Loci Regulating Glucose and Insulin Metabolism in Humans 
Diabetes  2010;59(5):1266-1275.
OBJECTIVE
Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed loci associated with glucose and insulin-related traits. We aimed to characterize 19 such loci using detailed measures of insulin processing, secretion, and sensitivity to help elucidate their role in regulation of glucose control, insulin secretion and/or action.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
We investigated associations of loci identified by the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC) with circulating proinsulin, measures of insulin secretion and sensitivity from oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs), euglycemic clamps, insulin suppression tests, or frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests in nondiabetic humans (n = 29,084).
RESULTS
The glucose-raising allele in MADD was associated with abnormal insulin processing (a dramatic effect on higher proinsulin levels, but no association with insulinogenic index) at extremely persuasive levels of statistical significance (P = 2.1 × 10−71). Defects in insulin processing and insulin secretion were seen in glucose-raising allele carriers at TCF7L2, SCL30A8, GIPR, and C2CD4B. Abnormalities in early insulin secretion were suggested in glucose-raising allele carriers at MTNR1B, GCK, FADS1, DGKB, and PROX1 (lower insulinogenic index; no association with proinsulin or insulin sensitivity). Two loci previously associated with fasting insulin (GCKR and IGF1) were associated with OGTT-derived insulin sensitivity indices in a consistent direction.
CONCLUSIONS
Genetic loci identified through their effect on hyperglycemia and/or hyperinsulinemia demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in associations with measures of insulin processing, secretion, and sensitivity. Our findings emphasize the importance of detailed physiological characterization of such loci for improved understanding of pathways associated with alterations in glucose homeostasis and eventually type 2 diabetes.
doi:10.2337/db09-1568
PMCID: PMC2857908  PMID: 20185807
8.  Sequence variants at CHRNB3-CHRNA6 and CYP2A6 affect smoking behavior 
Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E. | Gudbjartsson, Daniel F. | Surakka, Ida | Vink, Jacqueline M. | Amin, Najaf | Geller, Frank | Sulem, Patrick | Rafnar, Thorunn | Esko, Tõnu | Walter, Stefan | Gieger, Christian | Rawal, Rajesh | Mangino, Massimo | Prokopenko, Inga | Mägi, Reedik | Keskitalo, Kaisu | Gudjonsdottir, Iris H. | Gretarsdottir, Solveig | Stefansson, Hreinn | Thompson, John R. | Aulchenko, Yurii S. | Nelis, Mari | Aben, Katja K. | den Heijer, Martin | Dirksen, Asger | Ashraf, Haseem | Soranzo, Nicole | Valdes, Ana M | Steves, Claire | Uitterlinden, André G | Hofman, Albert | Tönjes, Anke | Kovacs, Peter | Hottenga, Jouke Jan | Willemsen, Gonneke | Vogelzangs, Nicole | Döring, Angela | Dahmen, Norbert | Nitz, Barbara | Pergadia, Michele L. | Saez, Berta | De Diego, Veronica | Lezcano, Victoria | Garcia-Prats, Maria D. | Ripatti, Samuli | Perola, Markus | Kettunen, Johannes | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Pouta, Anneli | Laitinen, Jaana | Isohanni, Matti | Huei-Yi, Shen | Allen, Maxine | Krestyaninova, Maria | Hall, Alistair S | Jones, Gregory T. | van Rij, Andre M. | Mueller, Thomas | Dieplinger, Benjamin | Haltmayer, Meinhard | Jonsson, Steinn | Matthiasson, Stefan E. | Oskarsson, Hogni | Tyrfingsson, Thorarinn | Kiemeney, Lambertus A. | Mayordomo, Jose I. | Lindholt, Jes S | Pedersen, Jesper Holst | Franklin, Wilbur A. | Wolf, Holly | Montgomery, Grant W. | Heath, Andrew C. | Martin, Nicholas G. | Madden, Pamela A.F. | Giegling, Ina | Rujescu, Dan | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Salomaa, Veikko | Stumvoll, Michael | Spector, Tim D | Wichmann, H-Erich | Metspalu, Andres | Samani, Nilesh J. | Penninx, Brenda W. | Oostra, Ben A. | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Tiemeier, Henning | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Kaprio, Jaakko | Gulcher, Jeffrey R. | McCarthy, Mark I. | Peltonen, Leena | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Stefansson, Kari
Nature genetics  2010;42(5):448-453.
Smoking is a risk factor for most of the diseases leading in mortality1. We conducted genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analyses of smoking data within the ENGAGE consortium to search for common alleles associating with the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) in smokers (N=31,266) and smoking initiation (N=46,481). We tested selected SNPs in a second stage (N=45,691 smokers), and assessed some in a third sample (N=9,040). Variants in three genomic regions associated with CPD (P< 5·10−8), including previously identified SNPs at 15q25 represented by rs1051730-A (0.80 CPD,P=2.4·10−69), and SNPs at 19q13 and 8p11, represented by rs4105144-C (0.39 CPD, P=2.2·10−12) and rs6474412-T (0.29 CPD,P= 1.4·10−8), respectively. Among the genes at the two novel loci, are genes encoding nicotine-metabolizing enzymes (CYP2A6 and CYP2B6), and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits (CHRNB3 and CHRNA6) highlighted in previous studies of nicotine dependence2-3. Nominal associations with lung cancer were observed at both 8p11 (rs6474412-T,OR=1.09,P=0.04) and 19q13 (rs4105144-C,OR=1.12,P=0.0006).
doi:10.1038/ng.573
PMCID: PMC3080600  PMID: 20418888
9.  Twelve type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci identified through large-scale association analysis 
Voight, Benjamin F | Scott, Laura J | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Morris, Andrew P | Dina, Christian | Welch, Ryan P | Zeggini, Eleftheria | Huth, Cornelia | Aulchenko, Yurii S | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | McCulloch, Laura J | Ferreira, Teresa | Grallert, Harald | Amin, Najaf | Wu, Guanming | Willer, Cristen J | Raychaudhuri, Soumya | McCarroll, Steve A | Langenberg, Claudia | Hofmann, Oliver M | Dupuis, Josée | Qi, Lu | Segrè, Ayellet V | van Hoek, Mandy | Navarro, Pau | Ardlie, Kristin | Balkau, Beverley | Benediktsson, Rafn | Bennett, Amanda J | Blagieva, Roza | Boerwinkle, Eric | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Boström, Kristina Bengtsson | Bravenboer, Bert | Bumpstead, Suzannah | Burtt, Noisël P | Charpentier, Guillaume | Chines, Peter S | Cornelis, Marilyn | Couper, David J | Crawford, Gabe | Doney, Alex S F | Elliott, Katherine S | Elliott, Amanda L | Erdos, Michael R | Fox, Caroline S | Franklin, Christopher S | Ganser, Martha | Gieger, Christian | Grarup, Niels | Green, Todd | Griffin, Simon | Groves, Christopher J | Guiducci, Candace | Hadjadj, Samy | Hassanali, Neelam | Herder, Christian | Isomaa, Bo | Jackson, Anne U | Johnson, Paul R V | Jørgensen, Torben | Kao, Wen H L | Klopp, Norman | Kong, Augustine | Kraft, Peter | Kuusisto, Johanna | Lauritzen, Torsten | Li, Man | Lieverse, Aloysius | Lindgren, Cecilia M | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Marre, Michel | Meitinger, Thomas | Midthjell, Kristian | Morken, Mario A | Narisu, Narisu | Nilsson, Peter | Owen, Katharine R | Payne, Felicity | Perry, John R B | Petersen, Ann-Kristin | Platou, Carl | Proença, Christine | Prokopenko, Inga | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Rayner, N William | Robertson, Neil R | Rocheleau, Ghislain | Roden, Michael | Sampson, Michael J | Saxena, Richa | Shields, Beverley M | Shrader, Peter | Sigurdsson, Gunnar | Sparsø, Thomas | Strassburger, Klaus | Stringham, Heather M | Sun, Qi | Swift, Amy J | Thorand, Barbara | Tichet, Jean | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | van Dam, Rob M | van Haeften, Timon W | van Herpt, Thijs | van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V | Walters, G Bragi | Weedon, Michael N | Wijmenga, Cisca | Witteman, Jacqueline | Bergman, Richard N | Cauchi, Stephane | Collins, Francis S | Gloyn, Anna L | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hansen, Torben | Hide, Winston A | Hitman, Graham A | Hofman, Albert | Hunter, David J | Hveem, Kristian | Laakso, Markku | Mohlke, Karen L | Morris, Andrew D | Palmer, Colin N A | Pramstaller, Peter P | Rudan, Igor | Sijbrands, Eric | Stein, Lincoln D | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Uitterlinden, Andre | Walker, Mark | Wareham, Nicholas J | Watanabe, Richard M | Abecasis, Gonçalo R | Boehm, Bernhard O | Campbell, Harry | Daly, Mark J | Hattersley, Andrew T | Hu, Frank B | Meigs, James B | Pankow, James S | Pedersen, Oluf | Wichmann, H-Erich | Barroso, Inês | Florez, Jose C | Frayling, Timothy M | Groop, Leif | Sladek, Rob | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Wilson, James F | Illig, Thomas | Froguel, Philippe | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Stefansson, Kari | Altshuler, David | Boehnke, Michael | McCarthy, Mark I
Nature genetics  2010;42(7):579-589.
By combining genome-wide association data from 8,130 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 38,987 controls of European descent and following up previously unidentified meta-analysis signals in a further 34,412 cases and 59,925 controls, we identified 12 new T2D association signals with combinedP < 5 × 10−8. These include a second independent signal at the KCNQ1 locus; the first report, to our knowledge, of an X-chromosomal association (near DUSP9); and a further instance of overlap between loci implicated in monogenic and multifactorial forms of diabetes (at HNF1A). The identified loci affect both beta-cell function and insulin action, and, overall, T2D association signals show evidence of enrichment for genes involved in cell cycle regulation. We also show that a high proportion of T2D susceptibility loci harbor independent association signals influencing apparently unrelated complex traits.
doi:10.1038/ng.609
PMCID: PMC3080658  PMID: 20581827
10.  Biological, Clinical, and Population Relevance of 95 Loci for Blood Lipids 
Teslovich, Tanya M. | Musunuru, Kiran | Smith, Albert V. | Edmondson, Andrew C. | Stylianou, Ioannis M. | Koseki, Masahiro | Pirruccello, James P. | Ripatti, Samuli | Chasman, Daniel I. | Willer, Cristen J. | Johansen, Christopher T. | Fouchier, Sigrid W. | Isaacs, Aaron | Peloso, Gina M. | Barbalic, Maja | Ricketts, Sally L. | Bis, Joshua C. | Aulchenko, Yurii S. | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Feitosa, Mary F. | Chambers, John | Orho-Melander, Marju | Melander, Olle | Johnson, Toby | Li, Xiaohui | Guo, Xiuqing | Li, Mingyao | Cho, Yoon Shin | Go, Min Jin | Kim, Young Jin | Lee, Jong-Young | Park, Taesung | Kim, Kyunga | Sim, Xueling | Ong, Rick Twee-Hee | Croteau-Chonka, Damien C. | Lange, Leslie A. | Smith, Joshua D. | Song, Kijoung | Zhao, Jing Hua | Yuan, Xin | Luan, Jian'an | Lamina, Claudia | Ziegler, Andreas | Zhang, Weihua | Zee, Robert Y.L. | Wright, Alan F. | Witteman, Jacqueline C.M. | Wilson, James F. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Wichmann, H-Erich | Whitfield, John B. | Waterworth, Dawn M. | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Waeber, Gérard | Vollenweider, Peter | Voight, Benjamin F. | Vitart, Veronique | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | Uda, Manuela | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Thompson, John R. | Tanaka, Toshiko | Surakka, Ida | Stringham, Heather M. | Spector, Tim D. | Soranzo, Nicole | Smit, Johannes H. | Sinisalo, Juha | Silander, Kaisa | Sijbrands, Eric J.G. | Scuteri, Angelo | Scott, James | Schlessinger, David | Sanna, Serena | Salomaa, Veikko | Saharinen, Juha | Sabatti, Chiara | Ruokonen, Aimo | Rudan, Igor | Rose, Lynda M. | Roberts, Robert | Rieder, Mark | Psaty, Bruce M. | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Pichler, Irene | Perola, Markus | Penninx, Brenda W.J.H. | Pedersen, Nancy L. | Pattaro, Cristian | Parker, Alex N. | Pare, Guillaume | Oostra, Ben A. | O'Donnell, Christopher J. | Nieminen, Markku S. | Nickerson, Deborah A. | Montgomery, Grant W. | Meitinger, Thomas | McPherson, Ruth | McCarthy, Mark I. | McArdle, Wendy | Masson, David | Martin, Nicholas G. | Marroni, Fabio | Mangino, Massimo | Magnusson, Patrik K.E. | Lucas, Gavin | Luben, Robert | Loos, Ruth J. F. | Lokki, Maisa | Lettre, Guillaume | Langenberg, Claudia | Launer, Lenore J. | Lakatta, Edward G. | Laaksonen, Reijo | Kyvik, Kirsten O. | Kronenberg, Florian | König, Inke R. | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Kaprio, Jaakko | Kaplan, Lee M. | Johansson, Åsa | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Janssens, A. Cecile J.W. | Ingelsson, Erik | Igl, Wilmar | Hovingh, G. Kees | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Hofman, Albert | Hicks, Andrew A. | Hengstenberg, Christian | Heid, Iris M. | Hayward, Caroline | Havulinna, Aki S. | Hastie, Nicholas D. | Harris, Tamara B. | Haritunians, Talin | Hall, Alistair S. | Gyllensten, Ulf | Guiducci, Candace | Groop, Leif C. | Gonzalez, Elena | Gieger, Christian | Freimer, Nelson B. | Ferrucci, Luigi | Erdmann, Jeanette | Elliott, Paul | Ejebe, Kenechi G. | Döring, Angela | Dominiczak, Anna F. | Demissie, Serkalem | Deloukas, Panagiotis | de Geus, Eco J.C. | de Faire, Ulf | Crawford, Gabriel | Collins, Francis S. | Chen, Yii-der I. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Campbell, Harry | Burtt, Noel P. | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Boekholdt, S. Matthijs | Bergman, Richard N. | Barroso, Inês | Bandinelli, Stefania | Ballantyne, Christie M. | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Quertermous, Thomas | Altshuler, David | Seielstad, Mark | Wong, Tien Y. | Tai, E-Shyong | Feranil, Alan B. | Kuzawa, Christopher W. | Adair, Linda S. | Taylor, Herman A. | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Gabriel, Stacey B. | Wilson, James G. | Stefansson, Kari | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Krauss, Ronald M. | Mohlke, Karen L. | Ordovas, Jose M. | Munroe, Patricia B. | Kooner, Jaspal S. | Tall, Alan R. | Hegele, Robert A. | Kastelein, John J.P. | Schadt, Eric E. | Rotter, Jerome I. | Boerwinkle, Eric | Strachan, David P. | Mooser, Vincent | Holm, Hilma | Reilly, Muredach P. | Samani, Nilesh J | Schunkert, Heribert | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Sandhu, Manjinder S. | Ridker, Paul M | Rader, Daniel J. | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Peltonen, Leena | Abecasis, Gonçalo R. | Boehnke, Michael | Kathiresan, Sekar
Nature  2010;466(7307):707-713.
Serum concentrations of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) are among the most important risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) and are targets for therapeutic intervention. We screened the genome for common variants associated with serum lipids in >100,000 individuals of European ancestry. Here we report 95 significantly associated loci (P < 5 × 10-8), with 59 showing genome-wide significant association with lipid traits for the first time. The newly reported associations include single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near known lipid regulators (e.g., CYP7A1, NPC1L1, and SCARB1) as well as in scores of loci not previously implicated in lipoprotein metabolism. The 95 loci contribute not only to normal variation in lipid traits but also to extreme lipid phenotypes and impact lipid traits in three non-European populations (East Asians, South Asians, and African Americans). Our results identify several novel loci associated with serum lipids that are also associated with CAD. Finally, we validated three of the novel genes—GALNT2, PPP1R3B, and TTC39B—with experiments in mouse models. Taken together, our findings provide the foundation to develop a broader biological understanding of lipoprotein metabolism and to identify new therapeutic opportunities for the prevention of CAD.
doi:10.1038/nature09270
PMCID: PMC3039276  PMID: 20686565
11.  Evaluation of Serum 1,5 Anhydroglucitol Levels as a Clinical Test to Differentiate Subtypes of Diabetes 
Diabetes Care  2010;33(2):252-257.
OBJECTIVE
Assignment of the correct molecular diagnosis in diabetes is necessary for informed decisions regarding treatment and prognosis. Better clinical markers would facilitate discrimination and prioritization for genetic testing between diabetes subtypes. Serum 1,5 anhydroglucitol (1,5AG) levels were reported to differentiate maturity-onset diabetes of the young due to HNF1A mutations (HNF1A-MODY) from type 2 diabetes, but this requires further validation. We evaluated serum 1,5AG in a range of diabetes subtypes as an adjunct for defining diabetes etiology.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
1,5AG was measured in U.K. subjects with: HNF1A-MODY (n = 23), MODY due to glucokinase mutations (GCK-MODY, n = 23), type 1 diabetes (n = 29), latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA, n = 42), and type 2 diabetes (n = 206). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to assess discriminative accuracy of 1,5AG for diabetes etiology.
RESULTS
Mean (SD range) 1,5AG levels were: GCK-MODY 13.06 μg/ml (5.74–29.74), HNF1A-MODY 4.23 μg/ml (2.12–8.44), type 1 diabetes 3.09 μg/ml (1.45–6.57), LADA 3.46 μg/ml (1.42–8.45), and type 2 diabetes 5.43 (2.12–13.23). Levels in GCK-MODY were higher than in other groups (P < 10−4 vs. each group). HNF1A-MODY subjects showed no difference in unadjusted 1,5AG levels from type 2 diabetes, type 1 diabetes, and LADA. Adjusting for A1C revealed a difference between HNF1A-MODY and type 2 diabetes (P = 0.001). The discriminative accuracy of unadjusted 1,5AG levels was 0.79 for GCK-MODY versus type 2 diabetes and 0.86 for GCK-MODY versus HNF1A-MODY but was only 0.60 for HNF1A-MODY versus type 2 diabetes.
CONCLUSIONS
In our dataset, serum 1,5AG performed well in discriminating GCK-MODY from other diabetes subtypes, particularly HNF1A-MODY. Measurement of 1,5AG levels could inform decisions regarding MODY diagnostic testing.
doi:10.2337/dc09-1246
PMCID: PMC2809258  PMID: 19933992
12.  SAIL—a software system for sample and phenotype availability across biobanks and cohorts 
Bioinformatics  2010;27(4):589-591.
Summary: The Sample avAILability system—SAIL—is a web based application for searching, browsing and annotating biological sample collections or biobank entries. By providing individual-level information on the availability of specific data types (phenotypes, genetic or genomic data) and samples within a collection, rather than the actual measurement data, resource integration can be facilitated. A flexible data structure enables the collection owners to provide descriptive information on their samples using existing or custom vocabularies. Users can query for the available samples by various parameters combining them via logical expressions. The system can be scaled to hold data from millions of samples with thousands of variables.
Availability: SAIL is available under Aferro-GPL open source license: https://github.com/sail.
Contact: gostev@ebi.ac.uk, support@simbioms.org
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online and from http://www.simbioms.org.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btq693
PMCID: PMC3035801  PMID: 21169373
13.  Integrated Genetic and Epigenetic Analysis Identifies Haplotype-Specific Methylation in the FTO Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity Susceptibility Locus 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(11):e14040.
Recent multi-dimensional approaches to the study of complex disease have revealed powerful insights into how genetic and epigenetic factors may underlie their aetiopathogenesis. We examined genotype-epigenotype interactions in the context of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), focussing on known regions of genomic susceptibility. We assayed DNA methylation in 60 females, stratified according to disease susceptibility haplotype using previously identified association loci. CpG methylation was assessed using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation on a targeted array (MeDIP-chip) and absolute methylation values were estimated using a Bayesian algorithm (BATMAN). Absolute methylation levels were quantified across LD blocks, and we identified increased DNA methylation on the FTO obesity susceptibility haplotype, tagged by the rs8050136 risk allele A (p = 9.40×10−4, permutation p = 1.0×10−3). Further analysis across the 46 kb LD block using sliding windows localised the most significant difference to be within a 7.7 kb region (p = 1.13×10−7). Sequence level analysis, followed by pyrosequencing validation, revealed that the methylation difference was driven by the co-ordinated phase of CpG-creating SNPs across the risk haplotype. This 7.7 kb region of haplotype-specific methylation (HSM), encapsulates a Highly Conserved Non-Coding Element (HCNE) that has previously been validated as a long-range enhancer, supported by the histone H3K4me1 enhancer signature. This study demonstrates that integration of Genome-Wide Association (GWA) SNP and epigenomic DNA methylation data can identify potential novel genotype-epigenotype interactions within disease-associated loci, thus providing a novel route to aid unravelling common complex diseases.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0014040
PMCID: PMC2987816  PMID: 21124985
14.  Dissection of the genetics of Parkinson's disease identifies an additional association 5′ of SNCA and multiple associated haplotypes at 17q21 
Human Molecular Genetics  2010;20(2):345-353.
We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 1705 Parkinson's disease (PD) UK patients and 5175 UK controls, the largest sample size so far for a PD GWAS. Replication was attempted in an additional cohort of 1039 French PD cases and 1984 controls for the 27 regions showing the strongest evidence of association (P< 10−4). We replicated published associations in the 4q22/SNCA and 17q21/MAPT chromosome regions (P< 10−10) and found evidence for an additional independent association in 4q22/SNCA. A detailed analysis of the haplotype structure at 17q21 showed that there are three separate risk groups within this region. We found weak but consistent evidence of association for common variants located in three previously published associated regions (4p15/BST1, 4p16/GAK and 1q32/PARK16). We found no support for the previously reported SNP association in 12q12/LRRK2. We also found an association of the two SNPs in 4q22/SNCA with the age of onset of the disease.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddq469
PMCID: PMC3005904  PMID: 21044948
15.  Variants in ADCY5 and near CCNL1 are associated with fetal growth and birth weight 
Freathy, Rachel M | Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O | Sovio, Ulla | Prokopenko, Inga | Timpson, Nicholas J | Berry, Diane J | Warrington, Nicole M | Widen, Elisabeth | Hottenga, Jouke Jan | Kaakinen, Marika | Lange, Leslie A | Bradfield, Jonathan P | Kerkhof, Marjan | Marsh, Julie A | Mägi, Reedik | Chen, Chih-Mei | Lyon, Helen N | Kirin, Mirna | Adair, Linda S | Aulchenko, Yurii S | Bennett, Amanda J | Borja, Judith B | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Charoen, Pimphen | Coin, Lachlan J M | Cousminer, Diana L | de Geus, Eco J. C. | Deloukas, Panos | Elliott, Paul | Evans, David M | Froguel, Philippe | Glaser, Beate | Groves, Christopher J | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Hirschhorn, Joel N | Hofman, Albert | Holly, Jeff M P | Hyppönen, Elina | Kanoni, Stavroula | Knight, Bridget A | Laitinen, Jaana | Lindgren, Cecilia M | McArdle, Wendy L | O'Reilly, Paul F | Pennell, Craig E | Postma, Dirkje S | Pouta, Anneli | Ramasamy, Adaikalavan | Rayner, Nigel W | Ring, Susan M | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Shields, Beverley M | Strachan, David P | Surakka, Ida | Taanila, Anja | Tiesler, Carla | Uitterlinden, Andre G | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Wijga, Alet H | Willemsen, Gonneke | Zhang, Haitao | Zhao, Jianhua | Wilson, James F | Steegers, Eric A P | Hattersley, Andrew T | Eriksson, Johan G | Peltonen, Leena | Mohlke, Karen L | Grant, Struan F A | Hakonarson, Hakon | Koppelman, Gerard H | Dedoussis, George V | Heinrich, Joachim | Gillman, Matthew W | Palmer, Lyle J | Frayling, Timothy M | Boomsma, Dorret I | Smith, George Davey | Power, Chris | Jaddoe, Vincent W V | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | McCarthy, Mark I
Nature genetics  2010;42(5):430-435.
INTRODUCTORY PARAGRAPH
To identify genetic variants associated with birth weight, we meta-analyzed six genome-wide association (GWA) studies (N=10,623 Europeans from pregnancy/birth cohorts) and followed up two lead signals in thirteen replication studies (N=27,591). Rs900400 near LEKR1 and CCNL1 (P=2×10−35), and rs9883204 in ADCY5 (P=7×10−15) were robustly associated with birth weight. Correlated SNPs in ADCY5 were recently implicated in regulation of glucose levels and type 2 diabetes susceptibility,1 providing evidence that the well described association between lower birth weight and subsequent type 2 diabetes2,3 has a genetic component, distinct from the proposed role of programming by maternal nutrition. Using data from both SNPs, the 9% of Europeans with 4 birth weight-lowering alleles were, on average, 113g (95%CI 89-137g) lighter at birth than the 24% with 0 or 1 allele (Ptrend=7×10−30). The impact on birth weight is similar to that of a mother smoking 4-5 cigarettes per day in the third trimester of pregnancy.4
doi:10.1038/ng.567
PMCID: PMC2862164  PMID: 20372150
16.  Genetic variation in GIPR influences the glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose challenge 
Saxena, Richa | Hivert, Marie-France | Langenberg, Claudia | Tanaka, Toshiko | Pankow, James S | Vollenweider, Peter | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Dupuis, Josée | Jackson, Anne U | Kao, W H Linda | Li, Man | Glazer, Nicole L | Manning, Alisa K | Luan, Jian’an | Stringham, Heather M | Prokopenko, Inga | Johnson, Toby | Grarup, Niels | Boesgaard, Trine W | Lecoeur, Cécile | Shrader, Peter | O’Connell, Jeffrey | Ingelsson, Erik | Couper, David J | Rice, Kenneth | Song, Kijoung | Andreasen, Camilla H | Dina, Christian | Köttgen, Anna | Le Bacquer, Olivier | Pattou, François | Taneera, Jalal | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Rybin, Denis | Ardlie, Kristin | Sampson, Michael | Qi, Lu | van Hoek, Mandy | Weedon, Michael N | Aulchenko, Yurii S | Voight, Benjamin F | Grallert, Harald | Balkau, Beverley | Bergman, Richard N | Bielinski, Suzette J | Bonnefond, Amelie | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Borch-Johnsen, Knut | Böttcher, Yvonne | Brunner, Eric | Buchanan, Thomas A | Bumpstead, Suzannah J | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Charpentier, Guillaume | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Chines, Peter S | Collins, Francis S | Cornelis, Marilyn | Crawford, Gabriel J | Delplanque, Jerome | Doney, Alex | Egan, Josephine M | Erdos, Michael R | Firmann, Mathieu | Forouhi, Nita G | Fox, Caroline S | Goodarzi, Mark O | Graessler, Jürgen | Hingorani, Aroon | Isomaa, Bo | Jørgensen, Torben | Kivimaki, Mika | Kovacs, Peter | Krohn, Knut | Kumari, Meena | Lauritzen, Torsten | Lévy-Marchal, Claire | Mayor, Vladimir | McAteer, Jarred B | Meyre, David | Mitchell, Braxton D | Mohlke, Karen L | Morken, Mario A | Narisu, Narisu | Palmer, Colin N A | Pakyz, Ruth | Pascoe, Laura | Payne, Felicity | Pearson, Daniel | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Sandbaek, Annelli | Sayer, Avan Aihie | Scott, Laura J | Sharp, Stephen J | Sijbrands, Eric | Singleton, Andrew | Siscovick, David S | Smith, Nicholas L | Sparsø, Thomas | Swift, Amy J | Syddall, Holly | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Tönjes, Anke | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T | Waeber, Gérard | Walley, Andrew | Waterworth, Dawn M | Zeggini, Eleftheria | Zhao, Jing Hua | Illig, Thomas | Wichmann, H Erich | Wilson, James F | van Duijn, Cornelia | Hu, Frank B | Morris, Andrew D | Frayling, Timothy M | Hattersley, Andrew T | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Stefansson, Kari | Nilsson, Peter | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Shuldiner, Alan R | Walker, Mark | Bornstein, Stefan R | Schwarz, Peter | Williams, Gordon H | Nathan, David M | Kuusisto, Johanna | Laakso, Markku | Cooper, Cyrus | Marmot, Michael | Ferrucci, Luigi | Mooser, Vincent | Stumvoll, Michael | Loos, Ruth J F | Altshuler, David | Psaty, Bruce M | Rotter, Jerome I | Boerwinkle, Eric | Hansen, Torben | Pedersen, Oluf | Florez, Jose C | McCarthy, Mark I | Boehnke, Michael | Barroso, Inês | Sladek, Robert | Froguel, Philippe | Meigs, James B | Groop, Leif | Wareham, Nicholas J | Watanabe, Richard M
Nature genetics  2010;42(2):142-148.
Glucose levels 2 h after an oral glucose challenge are a clinical measure of glucose tolerance used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. We report a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies (n = 15,234 nondiabetic individuals) and a follow-up of 29 independent loci (n = 6,958–30,620). We identify variants at the GIPR locus associated with 2-h glucose level (rs10423928, β (s.e.m.) = 0.09 (0.01) mmol/l per A allele, P = 2.0 × 10−15). The GIPR A-allele carriers also showed decreased insulin secretion (n = 22,492; insulinogenic index, P = 1.0 × 10−17; ratio of insulin to glucose area under the curve, P = 1.3 × 10−16) and diminished incretin effect (n = 804; P = 4.3 × 10−4). We also identified variants at ADCY5 (rs2877716, P = 4.2 × 10−16), VPS13C (rs17271305, P = 4.1 × 10−8), GCKR (rs1260326, P = 7.1 × 10−11) and TCF7L2 (rs7903146, P = 4.2 × 10−10) associated with 2-h glucose. Of the three newly implicated loci (GIPR, ADCY5 and VPS13C), only ADCY5 was found to be associated with type 2 diabetes in collaborating studies (n = 35,869 cases, 89,798 controls, OR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.09–1.15, P = 4.8 × 10−18).
doi:10.1038/ng.521
PMCID: PMC2922003  PMID: 20081857
17.  Life-Course Analysis of a Fat Mass and Obesity-Associated (FTO) Gene Variant and Body Mass Index in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 Using Structural Equation Modeling 
American Journal of Epidemiology  2010;172(6):653-665.
The association between variation in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene and adulthood body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)2) is well-replicated. More thorough analyses utilizing phenotypic data over the life course may deepen our understanding of the development of BMI and thus help in the prevention of obesity. The authors used a structural equation modeling approach to explore the network of variables associated with BMI from the prenatal period to age 31 years (1965–1997) in 4,435 subjects from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966. The use of structural equation modeling permitted the easy inclusion of variables with missing values in the analyses without separate imputation steps, as well as differentiation between direct and indirect effects. There was an association between the FTO single nucleotide polymorphism rs9939609 and BMI at age 31 years that persisted after controlling for several relevant factors during the life course. The total effect of the FTO variant on adult BMI was mostly composed of the direct effect, but a notable part was also arising indirectly via its effects on earlier BMI development. In addition to well-established genetic determinants, many life-course factors such as physical activity, in spite of not showing mediation or interaction, had a strong independent effect on BMI.
doi:10.1093/aje/kwq178
PMCID: PMC2938267  PMID: 20702506
body mass index; molecular epidemiology; structural equation model
18.  Evaluation of Association of HNF1B Variants with Diverse Cancers: Collaborative Analysis of Data from 19 Genome-Wide Association Studies 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(5):e10858.
Background
Genome-wide association studies have found type 2 diabetes-associated variants in the HNF1B gene to exhibit reciprocal associations with prostate cancer risk. We aimed to identify whether these variants may have an effect on cancer risk in general versus a specific effect on prostate cancer only.
Methodology/Principal Findings
In a collaborative analysis, we collected data from GWAS of cancer phenotypes for the frequently reported variants of HNF1B, rs4430796 and rs7501939, which are in linkage disequilibrium (r2 = 0.76, HapMap CEU). Overall, the analysis included 16 datasets on rs4430796 with 19,640 cancer cases and 21,929 controls; and 21 datasets on rs7501939 with 26,923 cases and 49,085 controls. Malignancies other than prostate cancer included colorectal, breast, lung and pancreatic cancers, and melanoma. Meta-analysis showed large between-dataset heterogeneity that was driven by different effects in prostate cancer and other cancers. The per-T2D-risk-allele odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for rs4430796 were 0.79 (0.76, 0.83)] per G allele for prostate cancer (p<10−15 for both); and 1.03 (0.99, 1.07) for all other cancers. Similarly for rs7501939 the per-T2D-risk-allele odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 0.80 (0.77, 0.83) per T allele for prostate cancer (p<10−15 for both); and 1.00 (0.97, 1.04) for all other cancers. No malignancy other than prostate cancer had a nominally statistically significant association.
Conclusions/Significance
The examined HNF1B variants have a highly specific effect on prostate cancer risk with no apparent association with any of the other studied cancer types.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0010858
PMCID: PMC2878330  PMID: 20526366
19.  Large-scale association analysis of TNF/LTA gene region polymorphisms in type 2 diabetes 
BMC Medical Genetics  2010;11:69.
Background
The TNF/LTA locus has been a long-standing T2D candidate gene. Several studies have examined association of TNF/LTA SNPs with T2D but the majority have been small-scale and produced no convincing evidence of association. The purpose of this study is to examine T2D association of tag SNPs in the TNF/LTA region capturing the majority of common variation in a large-scale sample set of UK/Irish origin.
Methods
This study comprised a case-control (1520 cases and 2570 control samples) and a family-based component (423 parent-offspring trios). Eleven tag SNPs (rs928815, rs909253, rs746868, rs1041981 (T60N), rs1800750, rs1800629 (G-308A), rs361525 (G-238A), rs3093662, rs3093664, rs3093665, and rs3093668) were selected across the TNF/LTA locus and genotyped using a fluorescence-based competitive allele specific assay. Quality control of the obtained genotypes was performed prior to single- and multi-point association analyses under the additive model.
Results
We did not find any consistent SNP associations with T2D in the case-control or family-based datasets.
Conclusions
The present study, designed to analyse a set of tag SNPs specifically selected to capture the majority of common variation in the TNF/LTA gene region, found no robust evidence for association with T2D. To investigate the presence of smaller effects of TNF/LTA gene variation with T2D, a large-scale meta-analysis will be required.
doi:10.1186/1471-2350-11-69
PMCID: PMC2873325  PMID: 20459604
20.  Two New Loci for Body-Weight Regulation Identified in a Joint Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Early-Onset Extreme Obesity in French and German Study Groups 
PLoS Genetics  2010;6(4):e1000916.
Meta-analyses of population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in adults have recently led to the detection of new genetic loci for obesity. Here we aimed to discover additional obesity loci in extremely obese children and adolescents. We also investigated if these results generalize by estimating the effects of these obesity loci in adults and in population-based samples including both children and adults. We jointly analysed two GWAS of 2,258 individuals and followed-up the best, according to lowest p-values, 44 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from 21 genomic regions in 3,141 individuals. After this DISCOVERY step, we explored if the findings derived from the extremely obese children and adolescents (10 SNPs from 5 genomic regions) generalized to (i) the population level and (ii) to adults by genotyping another 31,182 individuals (GENERALIZATION step). Apart from previously identified FTO, MC4R, and TMEM18, we detected two new loci for obesity: one in SDCCAG8 (serologically defined colon cancer antigen 8 gene; p = 1.85×10−8 in the DISCOVERY step) and one between TNKS (tankyrase, TRF1-interacting ankyrin-related ADP-ribose polymerase gene) and MSRA (methionine sulfoxide reductase A gene; p = 4.84×10−7), the latter finding being limited to children and adolescents as demonstrated in the GENERALIZATION step. The odds ratios for early-onset obesity were estimated at ∼1.10 per risk allele for both loci. Interestingly, the TNKS/MSRA locus has recently been found to be associated with adult waist circumference. In summary, we have completed a meta-analysis of two GWAS which both focus on extremely obese children and adolescents and replicated our findings in a large followed-up data set. We observed that genetic variants in or near FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, SDCCAG8, and TNKS/MSRA were robustly associated with early-onset obesity. We conclude that the currently known major common variants related to obesity overlap to a substantial degree between children and adults.
Author Summary
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully contributed to the detection of genetic variants involved in body-weight regulation. We jointly analysed two GWAS for early-onset extreme obesity in 2,258 individuals of European origin and followed-up the findings in 3,141 individuals. Evidence for association of markers in two new genetic loci was shown (SDCCAG8 on chromosome 1q43–q44 and between TNKS/MSRA on chromosome 8p23.1). We also re-identified variants in or near FTO, MC4R, and TMEM18 to be associated with extreme obesity. In addition, we assessed the effect of the markers in 31,182 obese, lean, normal weight, and unselected individuals from population-based samples and showed that the variants near FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, and SDCCAG8 were consistently associated with obesity. For variants of TNKS/MSRA, the obesity association was limited to children and adolescents. In summary, we detected two new obesity loci and confirmed that the currently known major common variants related to obesity overlap to a substantial degree between children and adults.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000916
PMCID: PMC2858696  PMID: 20421936
22.  Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Associated with Primary Tooth Development during Infancy 
PLoS Genetics  2010;6(2):e1000856.
Tooth development is a highly heritable process which relates to other growth and developmental processes, and which interacts with the development of the entire craniofacial complex. Abnormalities of tooth development are common, with tooth agenesis being the most common developmental anomaly in humans. We performed a genome-wide association study of time to first tooth eruption and number of teeth at one year in 4,564 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966) and 1,518 individuals from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). We identified 5 loci at P<5×10−8, and 5 with suggestive association (P<5×10−6). The loci included several genes with links to tooth and other organ development (KCNJ2, EDA, HOXB2, RAD51L1, IGF2BP1, HMGA2, MSRB3). Genes at four of the identified loci are implicated in the development of cancer. A variant within the HOXB gene cluster associated with occlusion defects requiring orthodontic treatment by age 31 years.
Author Summary
Genome-wide association studies have been used to identify genetic variants conferring susceptibility to diseases, intermediate phenotypes, and physiological traits such as height, hair color, and age at menarche. Here we analyze the NFBC1966 and ALSPAC birth cohorts to investigate the genetic determinants of a key developmental process: primary tooth development. The prospective nature of our studies allows us to exploit accurate measurements of age at first tooth eruption and number of teeth at one year, and also provides the opportunity to assess whether genetic variants affecting these traits are associated with dental problems later in the life course. Of the genes that we find to be associated with primary tooth development, several have established roles in tooth development and growth, and almost half have proposed links with the development of cancer. We find that one of the variants is also associated with occlusion defects requiring orthodontic treatment later in life. Our findings should provide a strong foundation for the study of the genetic architecture of tooth development, which as well as its relevance to medicine and dentistry, may have implications in evolutionary biology since teeth represent important markers of evolution.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000856
PMCID: PMC2829062  PMID: 20195514
23.  Variability of gene expression profiles in human blood and lymphoblastoid cell lines 
BMC Genomics  2010;11:96.
Background
Readily accessible samples such as peripheral blood or cell lines are increasingly being used in large cohorts to characterise gene expression differences between a patient group and healthy controls. However, cell and RNA isolation procedures and the variety of cell types that make up whole blood can affect gene expression measurements. We therefore systematically investigated global gene expression profiles in peripheral blood from six individuals collected during two visits by comparing five of the following cell and RNA isolation methods: whole blood (PAXgene), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), CD19 and CD20 specific B-cell subsets.
Results
Gene expression measurements were clearly discriminated by isolation method although the reproducibility was high for all methods (range ρ = 0.90-1.00). The PAXgene samples showed a decrease in the number of expressed genes (P < 1*10-16) with higher variability (P < 1*10-16) compared to the other methods. Differentially expressed probes between PAXgene and PBMCs were correlated with the number of monocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils or erythrocytes. The correlations (ρ = 0.83; ρ = 0.79) of the expression levels of detected probes between LCLs and B-cell subsets were much lower compared to the two B-cell isolation methods (ρ = 0.98). Gene ontology analysis of detected genes showed that genes involved in inflammatory responses are enriched in B-cells CD19 and CD20 whereas genes involved in alcohol metabolic process and the cell cycle were enriched in LCLs.
Conclusion
Gene expression profiles in blood-based samples are strongly dependent on the predominant constituent cell type(s) and RNA isolation method. It is crucial to understand the differences and variability of gene expression measurements between cell and RNA isolation procedures, and their relevance to disease processes, before application in large clinical studies.
doi:10.1186/1471-2164-11-96
PMCID: PMC2841682  PMID: 20141636
24.  Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution 
Heid, Iris M. | Jackson, Anne U. | Randall, Joshua C. | Winkler, Thomas W. | Qi, Lu | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Zillikens, M. Carola | Speliotes, Elizabeth K. | Mägi, Reedik | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | White, Charles C. | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Harris, Tamara B. | Berndt, Sonja I. | Ingelsson, Erik | Willer, Cristen J. | Weedon, Michael N. | Luan, Jian'an | Vedantam, Sailaja | Esko, Tõnu | Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O. | Kutalik, Zoltán | Li, Shengxu | Monda, Keri L. | Dixon, Anna L. | Holmes, Christopher C. | Kaplan, Lee M. | Liang, Liming | Min, Josine L. | Moffatt, Miriam F. | Molony, Cliona | Nicholson, George | Schadt, Eric E. | Zondervan, Krina T. | Feitosa, Mary F. | Ferreira, Teresa | Allen, Hana Lango | Weyant, Robert J. | Wheeler, Eleanor | Wood, Andrew R. | Estrada, Karol | Goddard, Michael E. | Lettre, Guillaume | Mangino, Massimo | Nyholt, Dale R. | Purcell, Shaun | Vernon Smith, Albert | Visscher, Peter M. | Yang, Jian | McCaroll, Steven A. | Nemesh, James | Voight, Benjamin F. | Absher, Devin | Amin, Najaf | Aspelund, Thor | Coin, Lachlan | Glazer, Nicole L. | Hayward, Caroline | Heard-Costa, Nancy L. | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Kaakinen, Marika | Kapur, Karen | Ketkar, Shamika | Knowles, Joshua W. | Kraft, Peter | Kraja, Aldi T. | Lamina, Claudia | Leitzmann, Michael F. | McKnight, Barbara | Morris, Andrew P. | Ong, Ken K. | Perry, John R.B. | Peters, Marjolein J. | Polasek, Ozren | Prokopenko, Inga | Rayner, Nigel W. | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Robertson, Neil R. | Sanna, Serena | Sovio, Ulla | Surakka, Ida | Teumer, Alexander | van Wingerden, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Zhao, Jing Hua | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Chines, Peter S. | Fisher, Eva | Kulzer, Jennifer R. | Lecoeur, Cecile | Narisu, Narisu | Sandholt, Camilla | Scott, Laura J. | Silander, Kaisa | Stark, Klaus | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Teslovich, Tanya M. | John Timpson, Nicholas | Watanabe, Richard M. | Welch, Ryan | Chasman, Daniel I. | Cooper, Matthew N. | Jansson, John-Olov | Kettunen, Johannes | Lawrence, Robert W. | Pellikka, Niina | Perola, Markus | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Alavere, Helene | Almgren, Peter | Atwood, Larry D. | Bennett, Amanda J. | Biffar, Reiner | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Buchanan, Thomas A. | Campbell, Harry | Day, Ian N.M. | Dei, Mariano | Dörr, Marcus | Elliott, Paul | Erdos, Michael R. | Eriksson, Johan G. | Freimer, Nelson B. | Fu, Mao | Gaget, Stefan | Geus, Eco J.C. | Gjesing, Anette P. | Grallert, Harald | Gräßler, Jürgen | Groves, Christopher J. | Guiducci, Candace | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Havulinna, Aki S. | Herzig, Karl-Heinz | Hicks, Andrew A. | Hui, Jennie | Igl, Wilmar | Jousilahti, Pekka | Jula, Antti | Kajantie, Eero | Kinnunen, Leena | Kolcic, Ivana | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kroemer, Heyo K. | Krzelj, Vjekoslav | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kvaloy, Kirsti | Laitinen, Jaana | Lantieri, Olivier | Lathrop, G. Mark | Lokki, Marja-Liisa | Luben, Robert N. | Ludwig, Barbara | McArdle, Wendy L. | McCarthy, Anne | Morken, Mario A. | Nelis, Mari | Neville, Matt J. | Paré, Guillaume | Parker, Alex N. | Peden, John F. | Pichler, Irene | Pietiläinen, Kirsi H. | Platou, Carl G.P. | Pouta, Anneli | Ridderstråle, Martin | Samani, Nilesh J. | Saramies, Jouko | Sinisalo, Juha | Smit, Jan H. | Strawbridge, Rona J. | Stringham, Heather M. | Swift, Amy J. | Teder-Laving, Maris | Thomson, Brian | Usala, Gianluca | van Meurs, Joyce B.J. | van Ommen, Gert-Jan | Vatin, Vincent | Volpato, Claudia B. | Wallaschofski, Henri | Walters, G. Bragi | Widen, Elisabeth | Wild, Sarah H. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witte, Daniel R. | Zgaga, Lina | Zitting, Paavo | Beilby, John P. | James, Alan L. | Kähönen, Mika | Lehtimäki, Terho | Nieminen, Markku S. | Ohlsson, Claes | Palmer, Lyle J. | Raitakari, Olli | Ridker, Paul M. | Stumvoll, Michael | Tönjes, Anke | Viikari, Jorma | Balkau, Beverley | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Bergman, Richard N. | Boeing, Heiner | Smith, George Davey | Ebrahim, Shah | Froguel, Philippe | Hansen, Torben | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hveem, Kristian | Isomaa, Bo | Jørgensen, Torben | Karpe, Fredrik | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Laakso, Markku | Lawlor, Debbie A. | Marre, Michel | Meitinger, Thomas | Metspalu, Andres | Midthjell, Kristian | Pedersen, Oluf | Salomaa, Veikko | Schwarz, Peter E.H. | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T. | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Arnold, Alice M. | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Bergmann, Sven | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Collins, Francis S. | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Hattersley, Andrew T. | Hofman, Albert | Hu, Frank B. | Illig, Thomas | Iribarren, Carlos | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kao, W.H. Linda | Kaprio, Jaakko | Launer, Lenore J. | Munroe, Patricia B. | Oostra, Ben | Penninx, Brenda W. | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Psaty, Bruce M. | Quertermous, Thomas | Rissanen, Aila | Rudan, Igor | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Soranzo, Nicole | Spector, Timothy D. | Syvanen, Ann-Christine | Uda, Manuela | Uitterlinden, André | Völzke, Henry | Vollenweider, Peter | Wilson, James F. | Witteman, Jacqueline C. | Wright, Alan F. | Abecasis, Gonçalo R. | Boehnke, Michael | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Deloukas, Panos | Frayling, Timothy M. | Groop, Leif C. | Haritunians, Talin | Hunter, David J. | Kaplan, Robert C. | North, Kari E. | O'Connell, Jeffrey R. | Peltonen, Leena | Schlessinger, David | Strachan, David P. | Hirschhorn, Joel N. | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Stefansson, Kari | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Barroso, Inês | McCarthy, Mark I. | Fox, Caroline S. | Mohlke, Karen L. | Lindgren, Cecilia M.
Nature genetics  2010;42(11):949-960.
Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body-mass-index (up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 novel loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1, and CPEB4 (P 1.9 × 10−9 to 1.8 × 10−40), and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex-difference 1.9 × 10−3 to 1.2 × 10−13). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution, independent of overall adiposity, and reveal powerful gene-by-sex interactions.
doi:10.1038/ng.685
PMCID: PMC3000924  PMID: 20935629
genome-wide association; waist-hip-ratio; body fat distribution; central obesity; meta-analysis; genetics; visceral adipose tissue; metabolism; body composition; Expression Quantitative Trait Loci; sex difference
25.  Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution 
Heid, Iris M | Jackson, Anne U | Randall, Joshua C | Winkler, Thomas W | Qi, Lu | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Zillikens, M Carola | Speliotes, Elizabeth K | Mägi, Reedik | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | White, Charles C | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Harris, Tamara B | Berndt, Sonja I | Ingelsson, Erik | Willer, Cristen J | Weedon, Michael N | Luan, Jian’An | Vedantam, Sailaja | Esko, Tõnu | Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O | Kutalik, Zoltán | Li, Shengxu | Monda, Keri L | Dixon, Anna L | Holmes, Christopher C | Kaplan, Lee M | Liang, Liming | Min, Josine L | Moffatt, Miriam F | Molony, Cliona | Nicholson, George | Schadt, Eric E | Zondervan, Krina T | Feitosa, Mary F | Ferreira, Teresa | Allen, Hana Lango | Weyant, Robert J | Wheeler, Eleanor | Wood, Andrew R | Estrada, Karol | Goddard, Michael E | Lettre, Guillaume | Mangino, Massimo | Nyholt, Dale R | Purcell, Shaun | Smith, Albert Vernon | Visscher, Peter M | Yang, Jian | McCarroll, Steven A | Nemesh, James | Voight, Benjamin F | Absher, Devin | Amin, Najaf | Aspelund, Thor | Coin, Lachlan | Glazer, Nicole L | Hayward, Caroline | Heard-costa, Nancy L | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Kaakinen, Marika | Kapur, Karen | Ketkar, Shamika | Knowles, Joshua W | Kraft, Peter | Kraja, Aldi T | Lamina, Claudia | Leitzmann, Michael F | McKnight, Barbara | Morris, Andrew P | Ong, Ken K | Perry, John R B | Peters, Marjolein J | Polasek, Ozren | Prokopenko, Inga | Rayner, Nigel W | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Robertson, Neil R | Sanna, Serena | Sovio, Ulla | Surakka, Ida | Teumer, Alexander | van Wingerden, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Zhao, Jing Hua | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Chines, Peter S | Fisher, Eva | Kulzer, Jennifer R | Lecoeur, Cecile | Narisu, Narisu | Sandholt, Camilla | Scott, Laura J | Silander, Kaisa | Stark, Klaus | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Teslovich, Tanya M | Timpson, Nicholas John | Watanabe, Richard M | Welch, Ryan | Chasman, Daniel I | Cooper, Matthew N | Jansson, John-Olov | Kettunen, Johannes | Lawrence, Robert W | Pellikka, Niina | Perola, Markus | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Alavere, Helene | Almgren, Peter | Atwood, Larry D | Bennett, Amanda J | Biffar, Reiner | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Bornstein, Stefan R | Buchanan, Thomas A | Campbell, Harry | Day, Ian N M | Dei, Mariano | Dörr, Marcus | Elliott, Paul | Erdos, Michael R | Eriksson, Johan G | Freimer, Nelson B | Fu, Mao | Gaget, Stefan | Geus, Eco J C | Gjesing, Anette P | Grallert, Harald | Gräßler, Jürgen | Groves, Christopher J | Guiducci, Candace | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Havulinna, Aki S | Herzig, Karl-Heinz | Hicks, Andrew A | Hui, Jennie | Igl, Wilmar | Jousilahti, Pekka | Jula, Antti | Kajantie, Eero | Kinnunen, Leena | Kolcic, Ivana | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kroemer, Heyo K | Krzelj, Vjekoslav | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kvaloy, Kirsti | Laitinen, Jaana | Lantieri, Olivier | Lathrop, G Mark | Lokki, Marja-Liisa | Luben, Robert N | Ludwig, Barbara | McArdle, Wendy L | McCarthy, Anne | Morken, Mario A | Nelis, Mari | Neville, Matt J | Paré, Guillaume | Parker, Alex N | Peden, John F | Pichler, Irene | Pietiläinen, Kirsi H | Platou, Carl G P | Pouta, Anneli | Ridderstråle, Martin | Samani, Nilesh J | Saramies, Jouko | Sinisalo, Juha | Smit, Jan H | Strawbridge, Rona J | Stringham, Heather M | Swift, Amy J | Teder-Laving, Maris | Thomson, Brian | Usala, Gianluca | van Meurs, Joyce B J | van Ommen, Gert-Jan | Vatin, Vincent | Volpato, Claudia B | Wallaschofski, Henri | Walters, G Bragi | Widen, Elisabeth | Wild, Sarah H | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witte, Daniel R | Zgaga, Lina | Zitting, Paavo | Beilby, John P | James, Alan L | Kähönen, Mika | Lehtimäki, Terho | Nieminen, Markku S | Ohlsson, Claes | Palmer, Lyle J | Raitakari, Olli | Ridker, Paul M | Stumvoll, Michael | Tönjes, Anke | Viikari, Jorma | Balkau, Beverley | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Bergman, Richard N | Boeing, Heiner | Smith, George Davey | Ebrahim, Shah | Froguel, Philippe | Hansen, Torben | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hveem, Kristian | Isomaa, Bo | Jørgensen, Torben | Karpe, Fredrik | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Laakso, Markku | Lawlor, Debbie A | Marre, Michel | Meitinger, Thomas | Metspalu, Andres | Midthjell, Kristian | Pedersen, Oluf | Salomaa, Veikko | Schwarz, Peter E H | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T | Wareham, Nicholas J | Arnold, Alice M | Beckmann, Jacques S | Bergmann, Sven | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I | Caulfield, Mark J | Collins, Francis S | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Hattersley, Andrew T | Hofman, Albert | Hu, Frank B | Illig, Thomas | Iribarren, Carlos | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kao, W H Linda | Kaprio, Jaakko | Launer, Lenore J | Munroe, Patricia B | Oostra, Ben | Penninx, Brenda W | Pramstaller, Peter P | Psaty, Bruce M | Quertermous, Thomas | Rissanen, Aila | Rudan, Igor | Shuldiner, Alan R | Soranzo, Nicole | Spector, Timothy D | Syvanen, Ann-Christine | Uda, Manuela | Uitterlinden, André | Völzke, Henry | Vollenweider, Peter | Wilson, James F | Witteman, Jacqueline C | Wright, Alan F | Abecasis, Gonçalo R | Boehnke, Michael | Borecki, Ingrid B | Deloukas, Panos | Frayling, Timothy M | Groop, Leif C | Haritunians, Talin | Hunter, David J | Kaplan, Robert C | North, Kari E | O’connell, Jeffrey R | Peltonen, Leena | Schlessinger, David | Strachan, David P | Hirschhorn, Joel N | Assimes, Themistocles L | Wichmann, H-Erich | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Stefansson, Kari | Cupples, L Adrienne | Loos, Ruth J F | Barroso, Inês | McCarthy, Mark I | Fox, Caroline S | Mohlke, Karen L | Lindgren, Cecilia M
Nature genetics  2010;42(11):949-960.
Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body mass index (comprising up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (comprising up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 new loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1 and CPEB4 (P = 1.9 × 10−9 to P = 1.8 × 10−40) and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex difference = 1.9 × 10−3 to P = 1.2 × 10−13). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution independent of overall adiposity and reveal strong gene-by-sex interactions.
doi:10.1038/ng.685
PMCID: PMC3000924  PMID: 20935629

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