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1.  Towards the genetic basis of cerebral venous thrombosis—the BEAST Consortium: a study protocol 
BMJ Open  2016;6(11):e012351.
Introduction
Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare cerebrovascular condition accounting for <1% of all stroke cases and mainly affects young adults. Its genetic aetiology is not clearly elucidated.
Methods and analysis
To better understand the genetic basis of CVT, we have established an international biobank of CVT cases, Biorepository to Establish the Aetiology of Sinovenous Thrombosis (BEAST) which aims to recruit highly phenotyped cases initially of European descent and later from other populations. To date we have recruited 745 CVT cases from 12 research centres. As an initial step, the consortium plans to undertake a genome-wide association analysis of CVT using the Illumina Infinium HumanCoreExome BeadChip to assess the association and impact of common and low-frequency genetic variants on CVT risk by using a case–control study design. Replication will be performed to confirm putative findings. Furthermore, we aim to identify interactions of genetic variants with several environmental and comorbidity factors which will likely contribute to improve the understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying this complex disease.
Ethics and dissemination
BEAST meets all ethical standards set by local institutional review boards for each of the participating sites. The research outcomes will be published in international peer-reviewed open-access journals with high impact and visibility. The results will be presented at national and international meetings to highlight the contributions into improving the understanding of the mechanisms underlying this uncommon but important disease. This international DNA repository will become an important resource for investigators in the field of haematological and vascular disorders.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012351
PMCID: PMC5128947  PMID: 27881526
cerebral venous thrombosis; ischemic stroke
2.  Single Nucleotide Variant rs2232710 in the Protein Z-Dependent Protease Inhibitor (ZPI, SERPINA10) Gene Is Not Associated with Deep Vein Thrombosis 
PLoS ONE  2016;11(3):e0151347.
Rare mutations in PROC, PROS1 or SERPINC1 as well as common variants in F5, F2, F11 and SERPINC1 have been identified as risk factors for deep vein thrombosis (DVT). To identify novel genetic risk factors for DVT, we have developed and applied next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) of the coding area of hemostatic and proinflammatory genes. Using this strategy, we previously identified a single nucleotide variant (SNV) rs6050 in the FGA gene and novel, rare SNVs in the ADAMTS13 gene associated with DVT. To identify novel coding variants in the genetic predisposition to DVT, we applied NGS analysis of the coding area of 186 hemostatic and proinflammatory genes in 94 DVT cases and 98 controls and we identified 18 variants with putative role in DVT. A group of 585 Italian idiopathic DVT patients and 550 healthy controls was used to genotype all the 18 risk-associated variants identified by NGS. Replication study in the Italian population identified the rs2232710 variant in the protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) gene to be associated with an increased risk of DVT (OR 2.74; 95% CI 1.33–5.65; P = 0.0045; Bonferroni P = 0.081). However, the rs2232710 SNV showed no association with DVT in two Dutch replication cohorts the LETS study (454 patients and 451 controls) and the MEGA study (3799 patients and 4399 controls), indicating that the rs2232710 variant is not a risk factor for DVT.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0151347
PMCID: PMC4794167  PMID: 26982741
3.  Identification of genetic risk variants for deep vein thrombosis by multiplexed next-generation sequencing of 186 hemostatic/pro-inflammatory genes 
Background
Next-generation DNA sequencing is opening new avenues for genetic association studies in common diseases that, like deep vein thrombosis (DVT), have a strong genetic predisposition still largely unexplained by currently identified risk variants. In order to develop sequencing and analytical pipelines for the application of next-generation sequencing to complex diseases, we conducted a pilot study sequencing the coding area of 186 hemostatic/proinflammatory genes in 10 Italian cases of idiopathic DVT and 12 healthy controls.
Results
A molecular-barcoding strategy was used to multiplex DNA target capture and sequencing, while retaining individual sequence information. Genomic libraries with barcode sequence-tags were pooled (in pools of 8 or 16 samples) and enriched for target DNA sequences. Sequencing was performed on ABI SOLiD-4 platforms. We produced > 12 gigabases of raw sequence data to sequence at high coverage (average: 42X) the 700-kilobase target area in 22 individuals. A total of 1876 high-quality genetic variants were identified (1778 single nucleotide substitutions and 98 insertions/deletions). Annotation on databases of genetic variation and human disease mutations revealed several novel, potentially deleterious mutations. We tested 576 common variants in a case-control association analysis, carrying the top-5 associations over to replication in up to 719 DVT cases and 719 controls. We also conducted an analysis of the burden of nonsynonymous variants in coagulation factor and anticoagulant genes. We found an excess of rare missense mutations in anticoagulant genes in DVT cases compared to controls and an association for a missense polymorphism of FGA (rs6050; p = 1.9 × 10-5, OR 1.45; 95% CI, 1.22-1.72; after replication in > 1400 individuals).
Conclusions
We implemented a barcode-based strategy to efficiently multiplex sequencing of hundreds of candidate genes in several individuals. In the relatively small dataset of our pilot study we were able to identify bona fide associations with DVT. Our study illustrates the potential of next-generation sequencing for the discovery of genetic variation predisposing to complex diseases.
doi:10.1186/1755-8794-5-7
PMCID: PMC3305575  PMID: 22353194
Deep vein thrombosis; venous thromboembolism; next-generation sequencing; target capture; multiplexing; FGA; rs6025; heamostateome; DVT; VTE

Results 1-3 (3)