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1.  A Toolbox for Spatiotemporal Analysis of Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging Data in Brain Slices 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(9):e108686.
Voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) can simultaneously monitor the spatiotemporal electrical dynamics of thousands of neurons and is often used to identify functional differences in models of neurological disease. While the chief advantage of VSDI is the ability to record spatiotemporal activity, there are no tools available to visualize and statistically compare activity across the full spatiotemporal range of the VSDI dataset. Investigators commonly analyze only a subset of the data, and a majority of the dataset is routinely excluded from analysis. We have developed a software toolbox that simplifies visual inspection of VSDI data, and permits unaided statistical comparison across spatial and temporal dimensions. First, the three-dimensional VSDI dataset (x,y,time) is geometrically transformed into a two-dimensional spatiotemporal map of activity. Second, statistical comparison between groups is performed using a non-parametric permutation test. The result is a 2D map of all significant differences in both space and time. Here, we used the toolbox to identify functional differences in activity in VSDI data from acute hippocampal slices obtained from epileptic Arx conditional knock-out and control mice. Maps of spatiotemporal activity were produced and analyzed to identify differences in the activity evoked by stimulation of each of two axonal inputs to the hippocampus: the perforant pathway and the temporoammonic pathway. In mutant hippocampal slices, the toolbox identified a widespread decrease in spatiotemporal activity evoked by the temporoammonic pathway. No significant differences were observed in the activity evoked by the perforant pathway. The VSDI toolbox permitted us to visualize and statistically compare activity across the spatiotemporal scope of the VSDI dataset. Sampling error was minimized because the representation of the data is standardized by the toolbox. Statistical comparisons were conducted quickly, across the spatiotemporal scope of the data, without a priori knowledge of the character of the responses or the likely differences between them.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0108686
PMCID: PMC4178182  PMID: 25259520
3.  CDKL5 and ARX mutations in males with early-onset epilepsy 
Pediatric neurology  2013;48(5):367-377.
Mutations in CDKL5 and ARX are known causes of early-onset epilepsy and severe developmental delay in males and females. While numerous males with ARX mutations associated with various phenotypes have been reported in the literature, the majority of CDKL5 mutations have been identified in females with a phenotype characterized by early-onset epilepsy, severe global developmental delay, absent speech, and stereotypic hand movements. To date, only ten males with CDKL5 mutations have been reported. Our retrospective study reports on the clinical, neuroimaging and molecular findings of 18 males with early-onset epilepsy caused by either CDKL5 or ARX mutations. The 18 patients include eight new males with CDKL5 mutations and ten with ARX mutations identified through sequence analysis of 266 and 346 males, respectively, at our molecular diagnostic laboratory. Our large data set therefore expands on the number of reported males with CDKL5 mutations and highlights that aberrations of CDKL5 and ARX combined are an important consideration in the genetic forms of early-onset epilepsy.
doi:10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2012.12.030
PMCID: PMC3742321  PMID: 23583054
4.  MEF2C Haploinsufficiency features consistent hyperkinesis, variable epilepsy, and has a role in dorsal and ventral neuronal developmental pathways 
Neurogenetics  2013;14(2):99-111.
MEF2C haploinsufficiency syndrome is an emerging neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability, autistic features, epilepsy, and abnormal movements. We report 16 new patients with MEF2C haploinsufficiency, including the oldest reported patient with MEF2C deletion at 5q14.3. We detail the neurobehavioral phenotype, epilepsy, and abnormal movements, and compare our subjects with those previously reported in the literature. We also investigate Mef2c expression in the developing mouse forebrain. A spectrum of neurofunctional deficits emerges, with hyperkinesis a consistent finding. Epilepsy varied from absent to severe, and included intractable myoclonic seizures and infantile spasms. Subjects with partial MEF2C deletion were statistically less likely to have epilepsy. Finally, we confirm that Mef2c is present both in dorsal primary neuroblasts and ventral gamma-aminobutyric acid(GABA)ergic interneurons in the forebrain of the developing mouse. Given interactions with several key neurodevelopmental genes such as ARX, FMR1, MECP2, and TBR1, it appears that MEF2C plays a role in several developmental stages of both dorsal and ventral neuronal cell types.
doi:10.1007/s10048-013-0356-y
PMCID: PMC3773516  PMID: 23389741
MEF2C haploinsufficiency; Intellectual disability; Autism; Infant-onset myoclonic epilepsy; Infantile spasms; Hyperkinesis; Deletion 5q14.3
5.  Focal cortical dysplasia is more common in boys than girls 
Epilepsy & behavior : E&B  2013;27(1):121-123.
Genetics and environment likely contribute to the development of medically intractable epilepsy, however, in most patients the specific combination of etiologies remains unknown. Here we undertook a multicenter retrospective cohort study of sex distribution in pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery, and carried out a secondary analysis of the same population subdivided by histopathologic diagnosis. In the multicenter cohort of intractable epilepsy patients undergoing surgery regardless of etiology (n=206), 63% were boys, which is significantly more boys than expected for the general population (Fisher exact two-tailed p=0.017). Subgroup analysis found that of the 90 patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia, 72% were boys, giving an odds ratio (OR) of 2.5 (95% CI, 1.34 to 4.62) for male sex. None of the other etiologies had a male sex predominance. Future studies could examine the biological relevance and potential genetic and pathophysiological mechanisms of this observation.
doi:10.1016/j.yebeh.2012.12.035
PMCID: PMC3930197  PMID: 23416281
focal cortical dysplasia; pediatric epilepsy; epilepsy surgery; gender; sex
6.  Leaving tissue associated with infrequent intracranial EEG seizure onsets is compatible with post-operative seizure freedom 
Journal of pediatric epilepsy  2012;1(4):211-219.
Identify seizure onset electrodes that need to be resected for seizure freedom in children undergoing intracranial electroencephalography recording for treatment of medically refractory epilepsy. All children undergoing intracranial electroencephalography subdural grid electrode placement at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia from 2002-2008 were asked to enroll. We utilized intraoperative pictures to determine the location of the electrodes and define the resection cavity. A total of 15 patients had surgical fields that allowed for complete identification of the electrodes over the area of resection. Eight of 15 patients were seizure free after a follow up of 1.7 to 8 yr. Only one seizure-free patient had complete resection of all seizure onset associated tissue. Seizure free patients had resection of 64.1% of the seizure onset electrode associated tissue, compared to 35.2% in the not seizure free patients (p=0.05). Resection of tissue associated with infrequent seizure onsets did not appear to be important for seizure freedom. Resecting ≥ 90% of the electrodes from the predominant seizure contacts predicted post-operative seizure freedom (p=0.007). The best predictor of seizure freedom was resecting ≥ 90% of tissue involved in majority of a patient’s seizures. Resection of tissue under infrequent seizure onset electrodes was not necessary for seizure freedom.
doi:10.3233/PEP-12033
PMCID: PMC3930198  PMID: 24563805
Epilepsy; epilepsy surgery; cortical dysplasia; neocortical epilepsy; intracranial electroencephalography
7.  AGC1 Deficiency Causes Infantile Epilepsy, Abnormal Myelination, and Reduced N-Acetylaspartate 
JIMD Reports  2014;14:77-85.
Background: Whole exome sequencing (WES) offers a powerful diagnostic tool to rapidly and efficiently sequence all coding genes in individuals presenting for consideration of phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous disorders such as suspected mitochondrial disease. Here, we report results of WES and functional validation in a consanguineous Indian kindred where two siblings presented with profound developmental delay, congenital hypotonia, refractory epilepsy, abnormal myelination, fluctuating basal ganglia changes, cerebral atrophy, and reduced N-acetylaspartate (NAA).
Methods: Whole blood DNA from one affected and one unaffected sibling was captured by Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon kit and sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq2000. Mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing in all family members. Protein from wild-type and mutant fibroblasts was isolated to assess mutation effects on protein expression and enzyme activity.
Results: A novel SLC25A12 homozygous missense mutation, c.1058G>A; p.Arg353Gln, segregated with disease in this kindred. SLC25A12 encodes the neuronal aspartate-glutamate carrier 1 (AGC1) protein, an essential component of the neuronal malate/aspartate shuttle that transfers NADH and H+ reducing equivalents from the cytosol to mitochondria. AGC1 activity enables neuronal export of aspartate, the glial substrate necessary for proper neuronal myelination. Recombinant mutant p.Arg353Gln AGC1 activity was reduced to 15% of wild type. One prior reported SLC25A12 mutation caused complete loss of AGC1 activity in a child with epilepsy, hypotonia, hypomyelination, and reduced brain NAA.
Conclusions: These data strongly suggest that SLC25A12 disease impairs neuronal AGC1 activity. SLC25A12 sequencing should be considered in children with infantile epilepsy, congenital hypotonia, global delay, abnormal myelination, and reduced brain NAA.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this chapter (doi:10.1007/8904_2013_287) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/8904_2013_287
PMCID: PMC4213337  PMID: 24515575
8.  Delayed Myelination in an Intrauterine Growth Retardation Model Is Mediated by Oxidative Stress Upregulating Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 
Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is associated with neurological deficits including cerebral palsy and cognitive and behavioral disabilities. The pathogenesis involves oxidative stress that leads to periventricular white matter injury with a paucity of mature oligodendrocytes and hypomyelination. The molecular mechanisms underlying this damage remain poorly understood. We employed a rat model of IUGR created by bilateral ligation of the uterine artery at embryonic day 19 that results in fetal growth retardation and oxidative stress in the developing brain. The IUGR rat pups showed significant delays in oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination that resolved by 8 weeks. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), which inhibits oligodendrocyte maturation, was elevated in IUGR brains at postnatal time points and returned to near normal by adulthood. Despite the apparent recovery, behavioral deficiencies were found in 8-week-old female animals, suggesting that the early transient myelination defects have permanent effects. In support of these in vivo data, oligodendrocyte precursor cells cultured from postnatal IUGR rats retained increased BMP4 expression and impaired differentiation that was reversed with the BMP inhibitor noggin. Oxidants in oligodendrocyte cultures increased BMP expression, which decreased differentiation; however, abrogating BMP signaling with noggin in vitro and in BMP-deficient mice prevented these effects. Together, these findings suggest that IUGR results in delayed myelination through the generation of oxidative stress that leads to BMP4 upregulation.
doi:10.1097/NEN.0b013e31825cfa81
PMCID: PMC3390978  PMID: 22710965
Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP); Intrauterine growth retardation; Myelin; Oligodendrocytes; Oxidative stress; Periventricular white matter injury
9.  Interictal EEG spikes identify the region of seizure onset in some, but not all pediatric epilepsy patients 
Epilepsia  2009;51(4):592-601.
Purpose
The role of sharps and spikes, interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs), in guiding epilepsy surgery in children remains controversial, particularly with intracranial EEG (IEEG). While ictal recording is the mainstay of localizing epileptic networks for surgical resection, current practice dictates removing regions generating frequent IEDs if they are near the ictal onset zone. Indeed, past studies suggest an inconsistent relationship between IED and seizure onset location, though these studies were based upon relatively short EEG epochs.
Methods
We employ a previously validated, computerized spike detector, to measure and localize IED activity over prolonged, representative segments of IEEG recorded from 19 children with intractable, mostly extra temporal lobe epilepsy. Approximately 8 hours of IEEG, randomly selected thirty-minute segments of continuous interictal IEEG per patient were analyzed over all intracranial electrode contacts.
Results
When spike frequency was averaged over the 16-time segments, electrodes with the highest mean spike frequency were found to be within the seizure onset region in 11 of 19 patients. There was significant variability between individual 30-minute segments in these patients, indicating that large statistical samples of interictal activity were required for improved localization. Low voltage fast EEG at seizure onset was the only clinical factor predicting IED localization to the seizure onset region.
Conclusions
Our data suggest that automated IED detection over multiple representative samples of IEEG may be of utility in planning epilepsy surgery for children with intractable epilepsy. Further research is required to better determine which patients may benefit from this technique a priori.
doi:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2009.02306.x
PMCID: PMC2907216  PMID: 19780794
Spike density; intracranial EEG; Seizure onset; Pediatric Epilepsy
10.  Identification of Arx transcriptional targets in the developing basal forebrain 
Human Molecular Genetics  2008;17(23):3740-3760.
Mutations in the aristaless-related homeobox (ARX) gene are associated with multiple neurologic disorders in humans. Studies in mice indicate Arx plays a role in neuronal progenitor proliferation and development of the cerebral cortex, thalamus, hippocampus, striatum, and olfactory bulbs. Specific defects associated with Arx loss of function include abnormal interneuron migration and subtype differentiation. How disruptions in ARX result in human disease and how loss of Arx in mice results in these phenotypes remains poorly understood. To gain insight into the biological functions of Arx, we performed a genome-wide expression screen to identify transcriptional changes within the subpallium in the absence of Arx. We have identified 84 genes whose expression was dysregulated in the absence of Arx. This population was enriched in genes involved in cell migration, axonal guidance, neurogenesis, and regulation of transcription and includes genes implicated in autism, epilepsy, and mental retardation; all features recognized in patients with ARX mutations. Additionally, we found Arx directly repressed three of the identified transcription factors: Lmo1, Ebf3 and Shox2. To further understand how the identified genes are involved in neural development, we used gene set enrichment algorithms to compare the Arx gene regulatory network (GRN) to the Dlx1/2 GRN and interneuron transcriptome. These analyses identified a subset of genes in the Arx GRN that are shared with that of the Dlx1/2 GRN and that are enriched in the interneuron transcriptome. These data indicate Arx plays multiple roles in forebrain development, both dependent and independent of Dlx1/2, and thus provides further insights into the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the pathology of mental retardation and epilepsy phenotypes resulting from ARX mutations.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddn271
PMCID: PMC2581427  PMID: 18799476

Results 1-10 (10)