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1.  Age-Dependent Evolution of the Yeast Protein Interaction Network Suggests a Limited Role of Gene Duplication and Divergence 
PLoS Computational Biology  2008;4(11):e1000232.
Proteins interact in complex protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks whose topological properties—such as scale-free topology, hierarchical modularity, and dissortativity—have suggested models of network evolution. Currently preferred models invoke preferential attachment or gene duplication and divergence to produce networks whose topology matches that observed for real PPIs, thus supporting these as likely models for network evolution. Here, we show that the interaction density and homodimeric frequency are highly protein age–dependent in real PPI networks in a manner which does not agree with these canonical models. In light of these results, we propose an alternative stochastic model, which adds each protein sequentially to a growing network in a manner analogous to protein crystal growth (CG) in solution. The key ideas are (1) interaction probability increases with availability of unoccupied interaction surface, thus following an anti-preferential attachment rule, (2) as a network grows, highly connected sub-networks emerge into protein modules or complexes, and (3) once a new protein is committed to a module, further connections tend to be localized within that module. The CG model produces PPI networks consistent in both topology and age distributions with real PPI networks and is well supported by the spatial arrangement of protein complexes of known 3-D structure, suggesting a plausible physical mechanism for network evolution.
Author Summary
Proteins function together forming stable protein complexes or transient interactions in various cellular processes, such as gene regulation and signaling. Here, we address the basic question of how these networks of interacting proteins evolve. This is an important problem, as the structures of such networks underlie important features of biological systems, such as functional modularity, error-tolerance, and stability. It is not yet known how these network architectures originate or what driving forces underlie the observed network structure. Several models have been proposed over the past decade—in particular, a “rich get richer” model (preferential attachment) and a model based upon gene duplication and divergence—often based only on network topologies. Here, we show that real yeast protein interaction networks show a unique age distribution among interacting proteins, which rules out these canonical models. In light of these results, we developed a simple, alternative model based on well-established physical principles, analogous to the process of growing protein crystals in solution. The model better explains many features of real PPI networks, including the network topologies, their characteristic age distributions, and the spatial distribution of subunits of differing ages within protein complexes, suggesting a plausible physical mechanism of network evolution.
doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000232
PMCID: PMC2583957  PMID: 19043579
2.  Inferring mouse gene functions from genomic-scale data using a combined functional network/classification strategy 
Genome Biology  2008;9(Suppl 1):S5.
The complete set of mouse genes, as with the set of human genes, is still largely uncharacterized, with many pieces of experimental evidence accumulating regarding the activities and expression of the genes, but the majority of genes as yet still of unknown function. Within the context of the MouseFunc competition, we developed and applied two distinct large-scale data mining approaches to infer the functions (Gene Ontology annotations) of mouse genes from experimental observations from available functional genomics, proteomics, comparative genomics, and phenotypic data. The two strategies — the first using classifiers to map features to annotations, the second propagating annotations from characterized genes to uncharacterized genes along edges in a network constructed from the features — offer alternative and possibly complementary approaches to providing functional annotations. Here, we re-implement and evaluate these approaches and their combination for their ability to predict the proper functional annotations of genes in the MouseFunc data set. We show that, when controlling for the same set of input features, the network approach generally outperformed a naïve Bayesian classifier approach, while their combination offers some improvement over either independently. We make our observations of predictive performance on the MouseFunc competition hold-out set, as well as on a ten-fold cross-validation of the MouseFunc data. Across all 1,339 annotated genes in the MouseFunc test set, the median predictive power was quite strong (median area under a receiver operating characteristic plot of 0.865 and average precision of 0.195), indicating that a mining-based strategy with existing data is a promising path towards discovering mammalian gene functions. As one product of this work, a high-confidence subset of the functional mouse gene network was produced — spanning >70% of mouse genes with >1.6 million associations — that is predictive of mouse (and therefore often human) gene function and functional associations. The network should be generally useful for mammalian gene functional analyses, such as for predicting interactions, inferring functional connections between genes and pathways, and prioritizing candidate genes. The network and all predictions are available on the worldwide web.
doi:10.1186/gb-2008-9-s1-s5
PMCID: PMC2447539  PMID: 18613949
3.  A critical assessment of Mus musculus gene function prediction using integrated genomic evidence 
Genome Biology  2008;9(Suppl 1):S2.
Background:
Several years after sequencing the human genome and the mouse genome, much remains to be discovered about the functions of most human and mouse genes. Computational prediction of gene function promises to help focus limited experimental resources on the most likely hypotheses. Several algorithms using diverse genomic data have been applied to this task in model organisms; however, the performance of such approaches in mammals has not yet been evaluated.
Results:
In this study, a standardized collection of mouse functional genomic data was assembled; nine bioinformatics teams used this data set to independently train classifiers and generate predictions of function, as defined by Gene Ontology (GO) terms, for 21,603 mouse genes; and the best performing submissions were combined in a single set of predictions. We identified strengths and weaknesses of current functional genomic data sets and compared the performance of function prediction algorithms. This analysis inferred functions for 76% of mouse genes, including 5,000 currently uncharacterized genes. At a recall rate of 20%, a unified set of predictions averaged 41% precision, with 26% of GO terms achieving a precision better than 90%.
Conclusion:
We performed a systematic evaluation of diverse, independently developed computational approaches for predicting gene function from heterogeneous data sources in mammals. The results show that currently available data for mammals allows predictions with both breadth and accuracy. Importantly, many highly novel predictions emerge for the 38% of mouse genes that remain uncharacterized.
doi:10.1186/gb-2008-9-s1-s2
PMCID: PMC2447536  PMID: 18613946

Results 1-3 (3)