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1.  The zebrafish reference genome sequence and its relationship to the human genome 
Howe, Kerstin | Clark, Matthew D. | Torroja, Carlos F. | Torrance, James | Berthelot, Camille | Muffato, Matthieu | Collins, John E. | Humphray, Sean | McLaren, Karen | Matthews, Lucy | McLaren, Stuart | Sealy, Ian | Caccamo, Mario | Churcher, Carol | Scott, Carol | Barrett, Jeffrey C. | Koch, Romke | Rauch, Gerd-Jörg | White, Simon | Chow, William | Kilian, Britt | Quintais, Leonor T. | Guerra-Assunção, José A. | Zhou, Yi | Gu, Yong | Yen, Jennifer | Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk | Eyre, Tina | Redmond, Seth | Banerjee, Ruby | Chi, Jianxiang | Fu, Beiyuan | Langley, Elizabeth | Maguire, Sean F. | Laird, Gavin K. | Lloyd, David | Kenyon, Emma | Donaldson, Sarah | Sehra, Harminder | Almeida-King, Jeff | Loveland, Jane | Trevanion, Stephen | Jones, Matt | Quail, Mike | Willey, Dave | Hunt, Adrienne | Burton, John | Sims, Sarah | McLay, Kirsten | Plumb, Bob | Davis, Joy | Clee, Chris | Oliver, Karen | Clark, Richard | Riddle, Clare | Eliott, David | Threadgold, Glen | Harden, Glenn | Ware, Darren | Mortimer, Beverly | Kerry, Giselle | Heath, Paul | Phillimore, Benjamin | Tracey, Alan | Corby, Nicole | Dunn, Matthew | Johnson, Christopher | Wood, Jonathan | Clark, Susan | Pelan, Sarah | Griffiths, Guy | Smith, Michelle | Glithero, Rebecca | Howden, Philip | Barker, Nicholas | Stevens, Christopher | Harley, Joanna | Holt, Karen | Panagiotidis, Georgios | Lovell, Jamieson | Beasley, Helen | Henderson, Carl | Gordon, Daria | Auger, Katherine | Wright, Deborah | Collins, Joanna | Raisen, Claire | Dyer, Lauren | Leung, Kenric | Robertson, Lauren | Ambridge, Kirsty | Leongamornlert, Daniel | McGuire, Sarah | Gilderthorp, Ruth | Griffiths, Coline | Manthravadi, Deepa | Nichol, Sarah | Barker, Gary | Whitehead, Siobhan | Kay, Michael | Brown, Jacqueline | Murnane, Clare | Gray, Emma | Humphries, Matthew | Sycamore, Neil | Barker, Darren | Saunders, David | Wallis, Justene | Babbage, Anne | Hammond, Sian | Mashreghi-Mohammadi, Maryam | Barr, Lucy | Martin, Sancha | Wray, Paul | Ellington, Andrew | Matthews, Nicholas | Ellwood, Matthew | Woodmansey, Rebecca | Clark, Graham | Cooper, James | Tromans, Anthony | Grafham, Darren | Skuce, Carl | Pandian, Richard | Andrews, Robert | Harrison, Elliot | Kimberley, Andrew | Garnett, Jane | Fosker, Nigel | Hall, Rebekah | Garner, Patrick | Kelly, Daniel | Bird, Christine | Palmer, Sophie | Gehring, Ines | Berger, Andrea | Dooley, Christopher M. | Ersan-Ürün, Zübeyde | Eser, Cigdem | Geiger, Horst | Geisler, Maria | Karotki, Lena | Kirn, Anette | Konantz, Judith | Konantz, Martina | Oberländer, Martina | Rudolph-Geiger, Silke | Teucke, Mathias | Osoegawa, Kazutoyo | Zhu, Baoli | Rapp, Amanda | Widaa, Sara | Langford, Cordelia | Yang, Fengtang | Carter, Nigel P. | Harrow, Jennifer | Ning, Zemin | Herrero, Javier | Searle, Steve M. J. | Enright, Anton | Geisler, Robert | Plasterk, Ronald H. A. | Lee, Charles | Westerfield, Monte | de Jong, Pieter J. | Zon, Leonard I. | Postlethwait, John H. | Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane | Hubbard, Tim J. P. | Crollius, Hugues Roest | Rogers, Jane | Stemple, Derek L.
Nature  2013;496(7446):498-503.
Zebrafish have become a popular organism for the study of vertebrate gene function1,2. The virtually transparent embryos of this species, and the ability to accelerate genetic studies by gene knockdown or overexpression, have led to the widespread use of zebrafish in the detailed investigation of vertebrate gene function and increasingly, the study of human genetic disease3–5. However, for effective modelling of human genetic disease it is important to understand the extent to which zebrafish genes and gene structures are related to orthologous human genes. To examine this, we generated a high-quality sequence assembly of the zebrafish genome, made up of an overlapping set of completely sequenced large-insert clones that were ordered and oriented using a high-resolution high-density meiotic map. Detailed automatic and manual annotation provides evidence of more than 26,000 protein-coding genes6, the largest gene set of any vertebrate so far sequenced. Comparison to the human reference genome shows that approximately 70% of human genes have at least one obvious zebrafish orthologue. In addition, the high quality of this genome assembly provides a clearer understanding of key genomic features such as a unique repeat content, a scarcity of pseudogenes, an enrichment of zebrafish-specific genes on chromosome 4 and chromosomal regions that influence sex determination.
doi:10.1038/nature12111
PMCID: PMC3703927  PMID: 23594743
2.  Tracking and coordinating an international curation effort for the CCDS Project 
The Consensus Coding Sequence (CCDS) collaboration involves curators at multiple centers with a goal of producing a conservative set of high quality, protein-coding region annotations for the human and mouse reference genome assemblies. The CCDS data set reflects a ‘gold standard’ definition of best supported protein annotations, and corresponding genes, which pass a standard series of quality assurance checks and are supported by manual curation. This data set supports use of genome annotation information by human and mouse researchers for effective experimental design, analysis and interpretation. The CCDS project consists of analysis of automated whole-genome annotation builds to identify identical CDS annotations, quality assurance testing and manual curation support. Identical CDS annotations are tracked with a CCDS identifier (ID) and any future change to the annotated CDS structure must be agreed upon by the collaborating members. CCDS curation guidelines were developed to address some aspects of curation in order to improve initial annotation consistency and to reduce time spent in discussing proposed annotation updates. Here, we present the current status of the CCDS database and details on our procedures to track and coordinate our efforts. We also present the relevant background and reasoning behind the curation standards that we have developed for CCDS database treatment of transcripts that are nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) candidates, for transcripts containing upstream open reading frames, for identifying the most likely translation start codons and for the annotation of readthrough transcripts. Examples are provided to illustrate the application of these guidelines.
Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CCDS/CcdsBrowse.cgi
doi:10.1093/database/bas008
PMCID: PMC3308164  PMID: 22434842
3.  DNA sequence of human chromosome 17 and analysis of rearrangement in the human lineage 
Zody, Michael C. | Garber, Manuel | Adams, David J. | Sharpe, Ted | Harrow, Jennifer | Lupski, James R. | Nicholson, Christine | Searle, Steven M. | Wilming, Laurens | Young, Sarah K. | Abouelleil, Amr | Allen, Nicole R. | Bi, Weimin | Bloom, Toby | Borowsky, Mark L. | Bugalter, Boris E. | Butler, Jonathan | Chang, Jean L. | Chen, Chao-Kung | Cook, April | Corum, Benjamin | Cuomo, Christina A. | de Jong, Pieter J. | DeCaprio, David | Dewar, Ken | FitzGerald, Michael | Gilbert, James | Gibson, Richard | Gnerre, Sante | Goldstein, Steven | Grafham, Darren V. | Grocock, Russell | Hafez, Nabil | Hagopian, Daniel S. | Hart, Elizabeth | Norman, Catherine Hosage | Humphray, Sean | Jaffe, David B. | Jones, Matt | Kamal, Michael | Khodiyar, Varsha K. | LaButti, Kurt | Laird, Gavin | Lehoczky, Jessica | Liu, Xiaohong | Lokyitsang, Tashi | Loveland, Jane | Lui, Annie | Macdonald, Pendexter | Major, John E. | Matthews, Lucy | Mauceli, Evan | McCarroll, Steven A. | Mihalev, Atanas H. | Mudge, Jonathan | Nguyen, Cindy | Nicol, Robert | O'Leary, Sinéad B. | Osoegawa, Kazutoyo | Schwartz, David C. | Shaw-Smith, Charles | Stankiewicz, Pawel | Steward, Charles | Swarbreck, David | Venkataraman, Vijay | Whittaker, Charles A. | Yang, Xiaoping | Zimmer, Andrew R. | Bradley, Allan | Hubbard, Tim | Birren, Bruce W. | Rogers, Jane | Lander, Eric S. | Nusbaum, Chad
Nature  2006;440(7087):1045-1049.
Chromosome 17 is unusual among the human chromosomes in many respects. It is the largest human autosome with orthology to only a single mouse chromosome1, mapping entirely to the distal half of mouse chromosome 11. Chromosome 17 is rich in protein-coding genes, having the second highest gene density in the genome2,3. It is also enriched in segmental duplications, ranking third in density among the autosomes4. Here we report a finished sequence for human chromosome 17, as well as a structural comparison with the finished sequence for mouse chromosome 11, the first finished mouse chromosome. Comparison of the orthologous regions reveals striking differences. In contrast to the typical pattern seen in mammalian evolution5,6, the human sequence has undergone extensive intrachromosomal rearrangement, whereas the mouse sequence has been remarkably stable. Moreover, although the human sequence has a high density of segmental duplication, the mouse sequence has a very low density. Notably, these segmental duplications correspond closely to the sites of structural rearrangement, demonstrating a link between duplication and rearrangement. Examination of the main classes of duplicated segments provides insight into the dynamics underlying expansion of chromosome-specific, low-copy repeats in the human genome.
doi:10.1038/nature04689
PMCID: PMC2610434  PMID: 16625196

Results 1-3 (3)