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1.  THE PRESENCE OF A GROUP A VARIANT-LIKE ANTIGEN IN STREPTOCOCCI OF OTHER GROUPS WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO GROUP N 
A Group A variant-like antigen has been detected in streptococci belonging to Groups D, E, G, M, and N. In Groups D and N the variant-like antigen was located in the streptococcal cell walls. In two strains of Group N streptococci (C559 and B209) the cell walls were chemically different and serologically distinct. In strain C559 N-acetylgalactosamine, and in strain B209, N-acetylglucosamine were the major determinants of serological specificity. The cell walls of strain C559 contained at least three serologically reactive components: a rhamnose-containing fraction that precipitated with an antiserum to Group A-variant carbohydrate; a strain-specific polysaccharide composed of galactosamine and glucosamine, both in the N-acetylated form and probably polymerized with an unidentified phosphorylated substance; and a component of unknown composition serologically related to a Group D streptococcus strain C3 (S. durans). An analogy is drawn between the cell wall structure in streptococcus and Salmonella.
PMCID: PMC2138942  PMID: 5111438
2.  Alkane Oxidation by a Particulate Preparation from Candida 
Journal of Bacteriology  1971;106(3):830-834.
The oxidation of decane by a cell-free particulate preparation from Candida intermedia was studied. Decane is oxidized to decanoate via decanol and decanaldehyde. Oxidation of decane to decanol requires molecular oxygen. Decanol is oxidized to decanaldehyde by a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-linked dehydrogenase differing greatly in specificity from ordinary yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. Decanaldehyde is oxidized to decanoate by a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-linked dehydrogenase that oxidizes long-chain aldehydes but not short-chain aldehydes. The enzymes that oxidize decane, decanol, and decanaldehyde are all induced when decane is present in the medium. These enzymes are apparently located in the cell membrane.
PMCID: PMC248700  PMID: 4326743
4.  Virus in Water 
Applied Microbiology  1971;21(3):405-410.
A preliminary study was carried out on evaluating a flow-through gauze sampler for its efficiency in recovering virus from both fresh and seawater. An attenuated type 1 poliovirus was used as the working model. When tap water was sampled, the amounts of virus adsorbed by the gauze pads were very small, about 2% of the total number of virus particles flowing through the device. The virus adsorption and recovery increased to 15 to 19% when seawater was sampled. Addition of NaCl to tap water produced a much better effect on virus adsorption and recovery by this device, i.e., 47% of the total virus particles in each sample. The best viral elution from the pads was obtained by using buffer solution of pH 8.0 to 9.0 containing a small amount of animal serum. Repeated elutions from the pads were necessary to recover the most virus although the first eluate contained approximately 50% of the adsorbed virus. Further development of this device appears warranted, because of (i) the simplicity of the procedure, (ii) its capability of sampling large volume of water, (iii) the low cost of collecting samples, and (iv) the feasibility of obtaining a rough quantitative assessment of viral pollutants in water examined.
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PMCID: PMC377193  PMID: 4324193

Results 1-4 (4)