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author:("Liu, changing")
1.  Assessment of the green florescence protein labeling method for tracking implanted mesenchymal stem cells 
Cytotechnology  2012;64(4):391-401.
Although green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeling is widely accepted as a tracking method, much remains uncertain regarding the retention of injected GFP-labeled cells implanted in ischemic organs. In this study, we evaluate the effectiveness of GFP for identifying and tracking implanted bone marrow- mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and the effect of GFP on the paracrine actions of these cells. MSCs isolated from rat femur marrow were transduced with a recombinant adenovirus carrying GFP. After transplantation of the GFP-labeled BM-MSCs into the infarct zone of rat hearts, the survival, distribution, and migration of the labeled cells were analyzed at 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. To evaluate the effect of GFP on the paracrine actions of BM-MSCs, Western blot analysis was performed to detect the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), b fibroblast growth factor (b FGF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2). GFP was successfully expressed by BM-MSCs in vitro. At 14 days after cell transplantation the GFP-positive cells could not be detected via confocal microscopy. By using a GFP antibody, distinct GFP-positive cells could be seen and quantitative analysis showed that the expression volume of GFP was 6.42 ± 0.92 mm3 after 3 days, 1.24 ± 0.76 mm3 after 7 days, 0.33 ± 0.03 mm3 after 14 days, and 0.09 ± 0.05 mm3 after 28 days. GFP labeling did not adversely affect the paracrine actions of BM-MSCs. GFP labeling could be used to track MSC distribution and their fate for at least 28 days after delivery to rat hearts with myocardial infarction, and this stem cell tracking strategy did not adversely affect the paracrine actions of BM-MSCs.
doi:10.1007/s10616-011-9417-y
PMCID: PMC3397108  PMID: 22373822
Cell tracking; Green fluorescent protein; Mesenchymal stem cells; paracrine; Myocardial infarction
2.  Genome Sequence of Enterococcus faecium Clinical Isolate LCT-EF128 
Journal of Bacteriology  2012;194(17):4765.
Enterococcus faecium, an opportunistic human pathogen that inhabits the gastrointestinal tracts of most mammals, has emerged as an important opportunistic nosocomial pathogen and is a prominent cause of multiresistant nosocomial infections. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain LCT-EF128, isolated from clinical specimens.
doi:10.1128/JB.00996-12
PMCID: PMC3415489  PMID: 22887667
3.  Draft Genome Sequence of Serratia marcescens Strain LCT-SM213 
Journal of Bacteriology  2012;194(16):4477-4478.
Serratia marcescens is a species of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium of the family Enterobacteriaceae. S. marcescens can cause nosocomial infections, particularly catheter-associated bacteremia, urinary tract infections, and wound infections. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Serratia marcescens strain LCT-SM213, which was isolated from CGMCC 1.1857.
doi:10.1128/JB.00933-12
PMCID: PMC3416218  PMID: 22843602
4.  Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli LCT-EC106 
Journal of Bacteriology  2012;194(16):4443-4444.
Escherichia coli is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in the intestine of warm-blooded organisms. Most E. coli strains are harmless, but some serotypes can cause serious food poisoning in humans. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli LCT-EC106, which was isolated from CGMCC 1.2385.
doi:10.1128/JB.00853-12
PMCID: PMC3416261  PMID: 22843582
5.  Whole-Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus aureus Strain LCT-SA112 
Journal of Bacteriology  2012;194(15):4124.
Staphylococcus aureus is a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive coccal bacterium. S. aureus is the most common species of Staphylococcus to cause staphylococcal infections, which are very common in clinical medicine. Here we report the genome sequence of S. aureus strain LCT-SA112, which was isolated from S. aureus subsp. aureus CGMCC 1.230.
doi:10.1128/JB.00710-12
PMCID: PMC3416511  PMID: 22815443
6.  Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain ATCC 27853 
Journal of Bacteriology  2012;194(14):3755.
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common bacterium that can cause disease. The versatility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa enables the organism to infect damaged tissues or those with reduced immunity which cause inflammation and sepsis. Here we report the genome sequence of the strain ATCC 27853.
doi:10.1128/JB.00690-12
PMCID: PMC3393497  PMID: 22740676
7.  Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus Strain LCT-BC244 
Journal of Bacteriology  2012;194(13):3549.
Bacillus cereus is a prevalent, soil-dwelling, Gram-positive bacterium. Some strains are harmful to humans and cause food-borne illness, while other strains can be beneficial as probiotics for animals. To gain insight into the bacterial genetic determinants, we report the genome sequence of a strain, LCT-BC244, which was isolated from CGMCC 1.230.
doi:10.1128/JB.00580-12
PMCID: PMC3434717  PMID: 22689237
8.  Draft Genome Sequence of Enterococcus faecium Strain LCT-EF90 
Journal of Bacteriology  2012;194(13):3556-3557.
Enterococcus faecium is an opportunistic human pathogen, found widely in the human gastrointestinal tract, and can also be isolated from a variety of plants, animals, insects, and other environmental sources. Here, we present the fine draft genome sequence of E. faecium LCT-EF90.
doi:10.1128/JB.00529-12
PMCID: PMC3434750  PMID: 22689242
9.  Whole-Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumonia Strain LCT-KP214 
Journal of Bacteriology  2012;194(12):3281.
Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative, nonmotile, encapsulated, lactose-fermenting, facultative anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium found in the normal flora of the mouth, skin, and intestines. Here we present the fine-draft genome sequence of K. pneumoniae strain LCT-KP214, which originated from K. pneumoniae strain CGMCC 1.1736.
doi:10.1128/JB.00531-12
PMCID: PMC3370881  PMID: 22628509
10.  Diagnostic value of urine sCD163 levels for sepsis and relevant acute kidney injury: a prospective study 
BMC Nephrology  2012;13:123.
Background
Sepsis is a common syndrome in critically ill patients and easily leads to the occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI), with high mortality rates. This study aimed to investigate the diagnostic value of urine soluble CD163 (sCD163) for identification of sepsis, severity of sepsis, and for secondary AKI, and to assess the patients’ prognosis.
Methods
We enrolled 20 cases with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), 40 cases with sepsis (further divided into 17 sepsis cases and 23 severe sepsis cases) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), and 20 control cases. Results for urine sCD163 were recorded on the day of admission to the ICU, and AKI occurrence was noted.
Results
On the day of ICU admission, the sepsis group exhibited higher levels of urine sCD163 (74.8 ng/ml; range: 47.9-148.3 ng/ml) compared with those in the SIRS group (31.9 ng/ml; 16.8-48.0, P < 0.001). The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.72-0.94, P < 0.001) the sensitivity was 0.83, and the specificity was 0.75 (based on a cut-off point of 43.0 ng/ml). Moreover, the severe sepsis group appeared to have a higher level of sCD163 compared with that in the sepsis group (76.2; 47.2-167.5 ng/ml vs. 74.2; 46.2-131.6 ng/ml), but this was not significant. For 15 patients with AKI, urine sCD163 levels at AKI diagnosis were significantly higher than those of the remaining 35 sepsis patients upon ICU admission (121.0; 74.6-299.1 ng/ml vs. 61.8; 42.8-128.3 ng/ml, P = 0.049). The AUC for urine sCD163 was 0.688 (95% CI: 0.51-0.87, P = 0.049). Sepsis patients with a poor prognosis showed a higher urine sCD163 level at ICU admission (98.6; 50.3-275.6 ng/ml vs. 68.0; 44.8-114.5 ng/ml), but this was not significant. Patients with AKI with a poor prognosis had higher sCD163 levels than those in patients with a better prognosis (205.9; 38.6-766.0 ng/ml vs. 80.9; 74.9-141.0 ng/ml), but this was not significant.
Conclusions
This study shows, for the first time, the potential value of urine sCD163 levels for identifying sepsis and diagnosing AKI, as well as for assessment of patients’ prognosis.
Trial Registration
ChiCTR-ONC-10000812
doi:10.1186/1471-2369-13-123
PMCID: PMC3506529  PMID: 23013330
Urine; Soluble CD163 (sCD163); Sepsis; Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS); Prognosis; Acute kidney injury (AKI)
11.  Value of soluble TREM-1, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein serum levels as biomarkers for detecting bacteremia among sepsis patients with new fever in intensive care units: a prospective cohort study 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2012;12:157.
Background
The purpose of this study was to explore the diagnostic value of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (sTREM-1), procalcitonin (PCT), and C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels for differentiating sepsis from SIRS, identifying new fever caused by bacteremia, and assessing prognosis when new fever occurred.
Methods
We enrolled 144 intensive care unit (ICU) patients: 60 with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and 84 with sepsis complicated by new fever at more than 48 h after ICU admission. Serum sTREM-1, PCT, and CRP levels were measured on the day of admission and at the occurrence of new fever (>38.3°C) during hospitalization. Based on the blood culture results, the patients were divided into a blood culture-positive bacteremia group (33 patients) and blood culture-negative group (51 patients). Based on 28-day survival, all patients, both blood culture-positive and -negative, were further divided into survivor and nonsurvivor groups.
Results
On ICU day 1, the sepsis group had higher serum sTREM-1, PCT, and CRP levels compared with the SIRS group (P <0.05). The areas under the curve (AUC) for these indicators were 0.868 (95% CI, 0.798–0.938), 0.729 (95% CI, 0.637–0.821), and 0.679 (95% CI, 0.578–0.771), respectively. With 108.9 pg/ml as the cut-off point for serum sTREM-1, sensitivity was 0.83 and specificity was 0.81. There was no statistically significant difference in serum sTREM-1 or PCT levels between the blood culture-positive and -negative bacteremia groups with ICU-acquired new fever. However, the nonsurvivors in the blood culture-positive bacteremia group had higher levels of serum sTREM-1 and PCT (P <0.05), with a prognostic AUC for serum sTREM-1 of 0.868 (95% CI, 0.740–0.997).
Conclusions
Serum sTREM-1, PCT, and CRP levels each have a role in the early diagnosis of sepsis. Serum sTREM-1, with the highest sensitivity and specificity of all indicators studied, is especially notable. sTREM-1, PCT, and CRP levels are of no use in determining new fever caused by bacteremia in ICU patients, but sTREM-1 levels reflect the prognosis of bacteremia.
Trial registration
ClinicalTrial.gov identifier NCT01410578
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-12-157
PMCID: PMC3426475  PMID: 22809118
Soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (sTREM-1); Fever; Sepsis; Bacteremia; Diagnosis; Prognosis

Results 1-11 (11)