PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-4 (4)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Cerebrovascular Disease Is Associated with Outcomes after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A U.S. Total Joint Registry Study 
The Journal of arthroplasty  2013;29(1):10.1016/j.arth.2013.04.003.
We assessed the association of cerebrovascular disease with patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of moderate-severe activity limitation and moderate-severe pain at 2- and 5-years after primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. 7,139 primary and 4,234 revision TKAs were included. Compared to the patients without cerebrovascular disease, those with cerebrovascular disease had a higher odds ratio (OR) of moderate-severe limitation at 2-years and 5-years, 1.32 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02, 1.72; P=0.04) and 1.83 (95% CI: 1.32, 2.55; P<0.001). No significant associations were noted with moderate-severe pain at 2-years or 5-years. In conclusion, we found that cerebrovascular disease is independently associated with pain and function outcomes after primary TKA. This should be taken into consideration when discussing expected outcomes of TKA with patients.
doi:10.1016/j.arth.2013.04.003
PMCID: PMC3783649  PMID: 23664282
Pain; Activity limitation; cerebrovascular disease; Total knee replacement; arthroplasty; joint replacement; outcomes; Patient-Reported Outcomes; Activities of Daily Living; ADLs; Function; functional limitation
2.  Total Knee Arthroplasty in Morbidly Obese Patients Treated with Bariatric Surgery: A Comparative Study 
The Journal of arthroplasty  2012;27(9):1696-1700.
Our objective was to compare outcomes (anesthesia time, total operative time, tourniquet time, duration of hospital stay, 90-day complication rate and transfusion rates) of patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) who underwent bariatric surgery before or after TKA. One-hundred-twenty-five patients were included: TKA before bariatric surgery (group 1; n=39); TKA within two years of bariatric surgery (group 2; n=25); and TKA more than 2 years after bariatric surgery (group 3; n=61). Patients with TKA more than 2 years after bariatric surgery had shorter anesthesia, total operative and tourniquet times than other groups; differences were significant between groups. Ninety-day complication and transfusion rates approached but did not meet statistical significance. Ninety-day complication rates and duration of hospital stay did not differ significantly between the three groups.
doi:10.1016/j.arth.2012.03.005
PMCID: PMC3413743  PMID: 22554730
Total knee arthroplasty; morbidly obese; bariatric surgery; outcomes
3.  Ninety-day Mortality in Patients Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty 
The Journal of arthroplasty  2012;27(8):1417-1422.e1.
Using an institutional Joint Registry, we studied frequency, trends and predictors of mortality following elective total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). Of the 12,727 and 12,484 patients who underwent THA and TKA respectively, all-cause mortality rates at 7-, 30- and 90-days were as follows: THA, 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.5%; TKA 0.1%. 0.2% and 0.4%, respectively. Statistically significant downward time-trend in 90-day mortality was noted after TKA (p=0.02), but not after THA (p=0.41). In multivariable-adjusted analyses of THA patients, older age, higher comorbidity index, and prior cardiac disease were significantly associated with higher 90-day mortality. In TKA patients, older age, male gender, ASA class of 3-4, and higher comorbidity index were associated with higher 90-day all-cause mortality. Optimization of disease management may reduce postoperative mortality after THA/TKA.
doi:10.1016/j.arth.2012.03.008
PMCID: PMC3413788  PMID: 22554727
4.  Higher Body Mass Index Is Not Associated with Worse Pain Outcomes After Primary or Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) 
The Journal of arthroplasty  2010;26(3):366-374.e1.
We assessed whether higher Body Mass Index (BMI) is associated with higher risk of moderate-severe knee pain 2- and 5-years after primary or revision Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA). We adjusted for gender, age, comorbidity, operative diagnosis and implant fixation in multivariable logistic regression. BMI (reference, <25 kg/m2) was not associated with moderate-severe knee pain at 2-years post-primary TKA (odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 25-29.9, 1.02 (0.75,1.39), p=0.90; 30-34.9, 0.93 (0.65,1.34), p=0.71; 35-39.9, 1.16 (0.77,1.74), p=0.47; ≥40, 1.09 (0.69,1.73), (all p-values ≥0.47). Similarly, BMI was not associated with moderate-severe pain at 5-year primary TKA and at 2- and 5-yr revision TKA follow-up. Lack of association of higher BMI with poor pain outcomes post-TKA implies that TKA should not be denied to obese patients for fear of suboptimal outcomes.
doi:10.1016/j.arth.2010.02.006
PMCID: PMC2930933  PMID: 20413245

Results 1-4 (4)