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1.  Sexual Aggression between Residents in Nursing Homes: Literature Synthesis for an Underrecognized Issue 
Evidence exists suggesting that most sexual aggression against older adults occurs in long-term care facilities. Fellow residents are the most common perpetrators, often due to inappropriate hypersexual behavior caused by dementing illness. This resident-to-resident sexual aggression (RRSA) is defined as sexual interactions between long-term care residents that in a community setting would likely be construed as unwelcome by at least one of the recipients and have high potential to cause physical or psychological distress in one or both of the involved. Although RRSA may be common and physical and psychological consequences for victims may be significant, this phenomenon has received little direct attention from researchers to date. We review the existing literature and relevant related research examining elder sexual abuse and hypersexual behavior to describe the epidemiologic features of this phenomenon, including risk factors for perpetrators and victims. Preventing and managing sexual aggression in nursing homes is made more challenging due to the legitimate and recognized need for nursing home residents, even those with advanced dementing illness, to sexually express themselves. We discuss the ethical dilemma this situation creates and the need to evaluate the capacity to consent to sexual activity among residents with dementing illness and to re-evaluate capacity as the diseases progress. We offer suggestions for managing RRSA incidents and for future research, including the importance of designing effective interventions.
doi:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2010.03064.x
PMCID: PMC3625650  PMID: 20840462
aggressive behavior; sexual abuse; nursing homes; sexual behavior; dementia
2.  Durable Responses with the Metronomic Regimen RT-PEPC in Elderly Patients with Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma 
Cancer  2010;116(11):2655-2664.
BACKGROUND
Targeting the tumor microenvironment and angiogenesis is a novel lymphoma therapeutic strategy. We report safety, activity and angiogenic profiling with the RT-PEPC regimen (rituximab with thalidomide, and prednisone, etoposide, procarbazine and cyclophosphamide) in recurrent mantle cell lymphoma (MCL).
METHODS
RT-PEPC includes induction (months 1–3) of weekly rituximab × 4, daily thalidomide (50 mg) and PEPC, then maintenance thalidomide (100 mg), oral PEPC titrated to neutrophil count, and rituximab every 4 months. Endpoints included safety, efficacy, quality of life (QoL), and translational studies including tumor angiogenic phenotyping, plasma VEGF and circulating endothelial cells.
RESULTS
Twenty-five pts were enrolled (22 evaluable) with median age 68 yrs (range 52–81), 24 (96%) stage III/IV, 18 (72%) IPI 3–5, 20 (80%) high risk MIPI, median 2 prior therapies (range 1–7), and 15 (60%) bortezomib progressors. At a median follow-up of 38 months, ORR was 73% (32% CR/CRu, 41% PR, n=22) and median PFS 10 months. Four CRs are ongoing (6+, 31+, 48+ and 50+ months). Toxicities included grade 1–2 fatigue, rash, neuropathy and cytopenias including grade 1–2 thrombocytopenia (64%) and grade 3–4 neutropenia (64%). Two thromboses and 5 grade 3–4 infections occurred. QoL was maintained or improved. Correlative studies demonstrated tumor autocrine angiogenic loop (expression of VEGFA and VEGFR1) and heightened angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in stroma. Plasma VEGF and circulating endothelial cells trended down with treatment.
CONCLUSIONS
RT-PEPC has significant and durable activity in MCL, with manageable toxicity and maintained QoL. Novel low-intensity approaches warrant further evaluation, potentially as initial therapy in elderly patients.
doi:10.1002/cncr.25055
PMCID: PMC3004744  PMID: 20235190

Results 1-2 (2)