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1.  Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 hnRNP A/B-Dependent Exonic Splicing Silencer ESSV Antagonizes Binding of U2AF65 to Viral Polypyrimidine Tracts 
Molecular and Cellular Biology  2003;23(23):8762-8772.
Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exonic splicing silencers (ESSs) inhibit production of certain spliced viral RNAs by repressing alternative splicing of the viral precursor RNA. Several HIV-1 ESSs interfere with spliceosome assembly by binding cellular hnRNP A/B proteins. Here, we have further characterized the mechanism of splicing repression using a representative HIV-1 hnRNP A/B-dependent ESS, ESSV, which regulates splicing at the vpr 3′ splice site. We show that hnRNP A/B proteins bound to ESSV are necessary to inhibit E complex assembly by competing with the binding of U2AF65 to the polypyrimidine tracts of repressed 3′ splice sites. We further show evidence suggesting that U1 snRNP binds the 5′ splice site despite an almost complete block of splicing by ESSV. Possible splicing-independent functions of U1 snRNP-5′ splice site interactions during virus replication are discussed.
doi:10.1128/MCB.23.23.8762-8772.2003
PMCID: PMC262674  PMID: 14612416
2.  Intrinsic differences between authentic and cryptic 5′ splice sites 
Nucleic Acids Research  2003;31(21):6321-6333.
Cryptic splice sites are used only when use of a natural splice site is disrupted by mutation. To determine the features that distinguish authentic from cryptic 5′ splice sites (5′ss), we systematically analyzed a set of 76 cryptic 5′ss derived from 46 human genes. These cryptic 5′ss have a similar frequency distribution in exons and introns, and are usually located close to the authentic 5′ss. Statistical analysis of the strengths of the 5′ss using the Shapiro and Senapathy matrix revealed that authentic 5′ss have significantly higher score values than cryptic 5′ss, which in turn have higher values than the mutant ones. β-Globin provides an interesting exception to this rule, so we chose it for detailed experimental analysis in vitro. We found that the sequences of the β-globin authentic and cryptic 5′ss, but not their surrounding context, determine the correct 5′ss choice, although their respective scores do not reflect this functional difference. Our analysis provides a statistical basis to explain the competitive advantage of authentic over cryptic 5′ss in most cases, and should facilitate the development of tools to reliably predict the effect of disease-associated 5′ss-disrupting mutations at the mRNA level.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkg830
PMCID: PMC275472  PMID: 14576320
3.  ESEfinder: a web resource to identify exonic splicing enhancers 
Nucleic Acids Research  2003;31(13):3568-3571.
Point mutations frequently cause genetic diseases by disrupting the correct pattern of pre-mRNA splicing. The effect of a point mutation within a coding sequence is traditionally attributed to the deduced change in the corresponding amino acid. However, some point mutations can have much more severe effects on the structure of the encoded protein, for example when they inactivate an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE), thereby resulting in exon skipping. ESEs also appear to be especially important in exons that normally undergo alternative splicing. Different classes of ESE consensus motifs have been described, but they are not always easily identified. ESEfinder (http://exon.cshl.edu/ESE/) is a web-based resource that facilitates rapid analysis of exon sequences to identify putative ESEs responsive to the human SR proteins SF2/ASF, SC35, SRp40 and SRp55, and to predict whether exonic mutations disrupt such elements.
PMCID: PMC169022  PMID: 12824367

Results 1-3 (3)