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author:("Ko, Young-hyh")
1.  Systemic EBV+ T-cell lymphoma in elderly patients: comparison with children and young adult patients 
Virchows Archiv  2008;453(2):155-163.
Fulminant Epstein–Barr virus (EBV+) T-cell lymphoma in immunocompetent elderly patients is rare and its character has not been well defined. This study analyzed the clinicopathological features of five elderly patients (group A: 50–84 years) and compared them with those of eight children and young adult patients with systemic T-cell lymphomas (group B: 10–34 years). Group A more commonly presented with generalized lymphadenopathy (n = 3) than did group B (n = 1). Chronic active EBV infection (n = 3) and hydroa vacciniforme-like eruptions (n = 1) were seen in group B, while group A showed no evidence of chronic EBV infection, but did show chronic hepatitis B or C virus infections (n = 3). The histological and immunophenotypical findings were similar. All patients died within 1 to 14 months of diagnosis. These findings suggest that EBV+ T-cell lymphoma in elderly patients is a unique disease with an underlying derangement of T-cell immunity and failure to eradicate infected virus. Additional factors related to senility may play a role in the disruption of homeostasis between the virus and the host’s immune system.
doi:10.1007/s00428-008-0640-7
PMCID: PMC2516298  PMID: 18636273
Epstein–Barr virus; Lymphoma; T-cell
2.  The Spectrum of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disease in Korea: Incidence of Disease Entities by Age Groups 
Journal of Korean Medical Science  2008;23(2):185-192.
This study is to identify the spectrum of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD) and relationships between these diseases in Korea. The EBV status and clinicopathology of 764 patients, including acute EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (EBV-HLH), chronic active EBV (CAEBV) infections, B-LPD arising in chronic latent EBV infection, T & natural killer (NK) cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL), B-NHLs, and Hodgkin's lymphomas (HD), were analyzed. T or NK cell NHLs were the most common forms of EBV-positive NHLs (107/167, 64%); among these, nasal-type NK/T cell lymphomas were the most common (89/107, 83%). According to the age, Burkitt's lymphoma was the most common in early childhood; in teenagers, chronic (active) EBV infection-associated LPD was the most common type. The incidence of NK/T cell lymphoma began to increase from the twenties and formed the major type of EBV-associated tumor throughout life. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma formed the major type in the sixties and seventies. In conclusion, primary infections in early childhood are complicated by the development of CAEBV infections that are main predisposing factors for EBV-associated T or NK cell malignancies in young adults. In old patients, decreased immunity associated with old age and environmental cofactors may provoke the development of peripheral T cell lymphoma, unspecified, and diffuse large B cell lymphoma.
doi:10.3346/jkms.2008.23.2.185
PMCID: PMC2526432  PMID: 18436998
Lymphoma; Epstein-Barr Virus; Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic

Results 1-2 (2)