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1.  Tuberculous Aneurysm of the Abdominal Aorta: Endovascular Repair Using Stent Grafts in Two Cases 
Korean Journal of Radiology  2000;1(4):215-218.
Tuberculous aneurysm of the aorta is exceedingly rare. To date, the standard therapy for mycotic aneurysm of the abdominal aorta has been surgery involving in-situ graft placement or extra-anatomic bypass surgery followed by effective anti-tuberculous medication. Only recently has the use of a stent graft in the treatment of tuberculous aortic aneurysm been described in the literature. We report two cases in which a tuberculous aneurysm of the abdominal aorta was successfully repaired using endovascular stent grafts. One case involved is a 42-year-old woman with a large suprarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and a right psoas abscess, and the other, a 41-year-old man in whom an abdominal aortic aneurysm ruptured during surgical drainage of a psoas abscess.
PMCID: PMC2718204  PMID: 11752958
Aorta, disease; Aorta, aneurysm; Aorta, grafts and prostheses
2.  Urinary Bladder Involvement in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: with Review of the Literature 
To investigate the etiologies of urinary bladder involvement in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the clinicoradiologic features of gastrointestinal tract manifestations and clinical outcomes in patients with lupus cystitis accompanied by gastrointestinal manifestations.
We conducted a retrospective chart review on 413 patients with SLE. Patients were selected for review on the basis of tower urinary tract symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency and urinary incontinence. Radiologic studies were analyzed in patients with lupus cystitis.
Ten consecutive patients, complicated with lower urinary tract symptoms, were identified. Underlying etiologies were as follows: lupus cystitis in five, neurogenic dysfunction secondary to transverse myelitis in three, cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis in one and tuberculous cystitis in one patient. All patients with lupus cystitis showed gastrointestinal manifestations, such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and/or diarrhea during the periods of cystitis symptoms. In all patients with lupus cystitis, paralytic ileus was demonstrated on plain abdominal X-ray and ascites, bilateral hydroureteronephrosis and thickened bladder wall were identified on abdominal ultrasound or CT. Abdominal CT revealed bowel wall thickening in four of the five patients. The main sites of thickened bowel on abdominal CT were territory supplied by superior mesenteric artery. Two of five patients with lupus cystitis expired during the follow-up period.
Diverse etiologies may cause lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with SLE. Lupus cystitis is strongly associated with gastrointestinal involvement and abdominal CT can be a useful radiologic tool to investigate the gastrointestinal tract involvement in patients with lupus cystitis.
PMCID: PMC4531746  PMID: 10714091
systemic lupus erythematosus; urinary bladder involvement; gastrointestinal tract involvement
3.  Systemic Mononuclear Inflammatory Vasculopathy Associated with Sjögren’s Syndrome in a Patient with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis 
We report a 46-year-old woman with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) presenting with Sjögren’s syndrome and systemic mononuclear inflammatory vasculopathy. Biopsy specimens of sural nerve showed findings consistent with vasculitic neuropathy. Perivascular inflammatory mononuclear cell infiltration was observed on muscle biopsy specimen. The findings of abdominal computed tomography and brain magnetic resonance imaging were suggestive of vasculitis. Clinical manifestations and radiologic findings were improved after high dose prednisolone therapy.
PMCID: PMC4531751  PMID: 10714099
systemic mononuclear inflammatory vasculopathy; Sjögren’s syndrome; primary biliary cirrhosis

Results 1-3 (3)