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1.  Posterior Interspinous Fusion Device for One-Level Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spine Disease : Comparison with Pedicle Screw Fixation - Preliminary Report of at Least One Year Follow Up 
Objective
Transpedicular screw fixation has some disadvantages such as postoperative back pain through wide muscle dissection, long operative time, and cephalad adjacent segmental degeneration (ASD). The purposes of this study are investigation and comparison of radiological and clinical results between interspinous fusion device (IFD) and pedicle screw.
Methods
From Jan. 2008 to Aug. 2009, 40 patients underwent spinal fusion with IFD combined with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). In same study period, 36 patients underwent spinal fusion with pedicle screw fixation as control group. Dynamic lateral radiographs, visual analogue scale (VAS), and Korean version of the Oswestry disability index (K-ODI) scores were evaluated in both groups.
Results
The lumbar spine diseases in the IFD group were as followings; spinal stenosis in 26, degenerative spondylolisthesis in 12, and intervertebral disc herniation in 2. The mean follow up period was 14.24 months (range; 12 to 22 months) in the IFD group and 18.3 months (range; 12 to 28 months) in pedicle screw group. The mean VAS scores was preoperatively 7.16±2.1 and 8.03±2.3 in the IFD and pedicle screw groups, respectively, and improved postoperatively to 1.3±2.9 and 1.2±3.2 in 1-year follow ups (p<0.05). The K-ODI was decreased significantly in an equal amount in both groups one year postoperatively (p<0.05). The statistics revealed a higher incidence of ASD in pedicle screw group than the IFD group (p=0.029).
Conclusion
Posterior IFD has several advantages over the pedicle screw fixation in terms of skin incision, muscle dissection and short operative time and less intraoperative estimated blood loss. The IFD with PLIF may be a favorable technique to replace the pedicle screw fixation in selective case.
doi:10.3340/jkns.2012.52.4.359
PMCID: PMC3488645  PMID: 23133725
Degenerative; Fusion device; Interspinous; Lumbar disease; Posterior; Adjacent segmental degeneration
2.  Terson Syndrome Caused by Intraventricular Hemorrhage Associated with Moyamoya Disease 
Terson syndrome was originally used to describe a vitreous hemorrhage arising from aneurysmal subrarachnoid hemorrhage. Terson syndrome can be caused by intracranial hemorrhage, subdural or epidural hematoma and severe brain injury but is extremely rare in intraventricular hemorrhage associated with moyamoya disease. A 41-year-old man presented with left visual disturbance. He had a history of intraventicular hemorrhage associated with moyamoya disease three months prior to admission. At that time he was in comatose mentality. Ophthalmologic examination at our hospital detected a vitreous hemorrhage in his left eye, with right eye remaining normal. Vitrectomy with epiretinal membrane removal was performed. After operation his left visual acuity was recovered. Careful ophthalmologic examination is mandatory in patients with hemorrhagic moyamoya disease.
doi:10.3340/jkns.2012.51.6.367
PMCID: PMC3424178  PMID: 22949967
Moyamoya disease; Terson syndrome; Intraventricular hemorrhage
3.  Fusiform Aneurysm Presenting with Cervical Radiculopathy in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome 
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is characterized by its clinical manifestations, which are easy bruising, thin skin with visible veins, and rupture of arteries, uterus, or intestines. Arterial complications are the leading cause of death in vascular EDS because they are unpredictable and surgical repair is difficult due to tissue fragility. The authors report a case presented with cervical radiculopathy due to a segmental fusiform aneurysm of the cervical vertebral artery. Transfemoral cerebral angiography (TFCA) was done to verify the aneurysmal dilatation. However, during TFCA, bleeding at the puncture site was not controlled, skin and underlying muscle was disrupted and profound bleeding occurred during manual compression after femoral catheter removal. Accordingly, surgical repair of the injured femoral artery was performed. At this time it was possible to diagnose it as an EDS with fusiform aneurysm on cervical vertebral artery. Particularly, cervical fusiform aneurysm is rare condition, and therefore, connective tissue disorder must be considered in such cases. If connective tissue disorder is suspected, the authors suggest that a noninvasive imaging modality, such as, high quality computed tomography angiography, be used to evaluate the vascular lesion to avoid potential arterial complications.
doi:10.3340/jkns.2010.48.6.528
PMCID: PMC3053548  PMID: 21430980
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome; Cervical radiculopathy; Fusiform aneurysm; Vascular reconstruction
4.  Brain Magnetic Resolution Imaging to Diagnose Bing-Neel Syndrome 
Radiologic findings of Bing-Neel syndrome, which is an extremely uncommon complication resulting from malignant lymphocyte infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS) in patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM), have been infrequently reported due to extreme rarity of the case. A 75-year-old man with WM presented at a neurology clinic with progressive gait and memory disturbances, and dysarthria of 2 months duration. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum protein electrophoresis and immunofixation electrophoresis showed IgM kappa-type monoclonal gammopathy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed multifocal, hyperintense lesions on T2 weighted-images. Brain diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) demonstrated hyperintensities in cerebral and cerebellar lesions that appeared isointense on apparent diffusion coefficient maps, which were compatible with vasogenic edema. Although histologic analysis is a confirmative study to prove direct cell infiltration into the brain, brain MRI with DWI may be a good supportive study to diagnose Bing-Neel syndrome.
doi:10.3340/jkns.2009.46.6.588
PMCID: PMC2803279  PMID: 20062579
Bing-Neel syndrome; Waldenström's macroglobulinemia; MRI
5.  Comparison of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy and Open Lumbar Microdiscectomy for Recurrent Disc Herniation 
Objective
The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and radiological outcomes of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and open lumbar microdiscectomy (OLM) for recurrent disc herniation.
Methods
Fifty-four patients, who underwent surgery, either PELD (25 patients) or repeated OLM (29 patients), due to recurrent disc herniation at L4-5 level, were divided into two groups according to the surgical methods. Excluded were patients with sequestrated disc, calcified disc, severe neurological deficit, or instability. Clinical outcomes were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiological variables were assessed using plain radiography and/or magnetic resonance imaging.
Results
Mean operating time and hospital stay were significantly shorter in PELD group (45.8 minutes and 0.9 day, respectively) than OLM group (73.8 minutes and 3.8 days, respectively) (p < 0.001). Complications occurred in 4% in PELD group and 10.3% in OLM group in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 34.2 months, the mean improvements of back pain, leg pain, and functional improvement were 4.0, 5.5, and 40.9% for PELD group and 2.3, 5.1, and 45.0% for OLM group, respectively. Second recurrence occurred in 4% after PELD and 10.3% after OLM. Disc height did not change after PELD, but significantly decreased after OLM (p = 0.0001). Neither sagittal rotation angle nor volume of multifidus muscle changed significantly in both groups.
Conclusion
Both PELD and repeated OLM showed favorable outcomes for recurrent disc herniation, but PELD had advantages in terms of shorter operating time, hospital stay, and disc height preservation.
doi:10.3340/jkns.2009.46.6.515
PMCID: PMC2803265  PMID: 20062565
Reherniation; Discectomy; Lumbar spine

Results 1-5 (5)