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1.  Correlation between epithelial cell proliferation and histological grading in gastric mucosa. 
Journal of Clinical Pathology  1999;52(5):367-371.
AIM: To determine if there is a correlation between the histological findings in the gastric mucosa and the degree of cell proliferation in gastric antral biopsies. METHODS: Cell proliferation in gastric antral biopsies was determined by in vitro bromodeoxyuridine labelling. Histological sections were assessed using the Sydney System. RESULTS: There was a positive correlation between antral mucosal cell proliferation and the acute inflammatory cell infiltrate (r = 0.29; p = 0.03). There was a stronger correlation with the chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate (r = 0.53; p < 0.0001) and the density of H pylori colonisation (r = 0.54; p < 0.0001). There was no correlation between gastric epithelial proliferation and the degree of atrophy. Stepwise multiple regression indicates that the only independent predictor of epithelial cell proliferation is the density of H pylori colonisation (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: H pylori increases gastric epithelial cell proliferation through the mucosal inflammatory response and probably by other means. The strong correlation between epithelial proliferation, the chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate, and the density of H pylori colonization may have implications for gastric carcinogenesis.
PMCID: PMC1023074  PMID: 10560358
2.  Comparison of labelling by bromodeoxyuridine, MIB-1, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in gastric mucosal biopsy specimens. 
Journal of Clinical Pathology  1994;47(2):122-125.
AIMS--To compare proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and MIB-1 with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) pulse labelling, a specific marker of cell proliferation, in endoscopic gastric biopsy specimens. METHODS--Twenty four biopsy specimens were obtained from 12 patients: 10 antral and eight body specimens were suitable. Each specimen was routinely processed and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. A modified Giemsa stain was used to detect the presence of Helicobacter pylori. Sections of the specimens were labelled with BrdU, MIB-1, and PC10. Gastric mucosa specimens were divided into three zones. The numbers of positively staining nuclei for 500 epithelial cell nuclei were counted in each zone and expressed as a percentage. RESULTS--The proportion of PCNA positive cells (range 0-90%) was much greater in all specimens (10 antrum, eight body). BrdU positive cells were virtually all confined to zone 2 (0-17% cells in this zone were positive) (zone 1 = surface and gastric pit, zone 2 = isthmus, zone 3 = gland base), while PCNA positive cells were present in all three zones (1 = 23-90%, 2 = 43-90%, 3 = 0-74%). Spearman's rank coefficient correlation of 0.57 confirmed that the percentage of positively staining cells varied in the same direction for both PCNA and BrdU (p < 0.001). PCNA, however, was overexpressed in all zones of the gastric epithelium compared with BrdU. In 38 biopsy specimens from 19 patients, of which 14 antrum and 11 body were suitable, the proportion of MIB-1 positive cells (0-59%) was greater than BrdU in most. As with BrdU labelling, the MIB-1 positive cells were confined to zone 2 (zone 1 = 1-11%); zone 2 = 21-59%; zone 3 = 0-13%) and the coefficient correlation for MIB-1 and BrdU was 0.63 (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS--MIB-1 accurately reflects the S-phase fraction in gastric mucosa, determined by BrdU labelling in conventionally processed gastric biopsy material. Caution is needed in the interpretation of PCNA labelling detected by PC10, which should not be accepted uncritically as a marker of cell proliferation in paraffin wax embedded material.
PMCID: PMC501824  PMID: 7907613
3.  Cell proliferation in the gastric corpus in Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis and after gastric resection. 
Gut  1995;36(3):351-353.
Patients who have undergone gastric resection are at higher risk of developing gastric carcinoma than normal subjects, and bile reflux is believed to play a role in carcinogenesis. An increase in mucosal cell proliferation increases the likelihood of a neoplastic clone of epithelial cells emerging, particularly where there is chronic epithelial injury associated with bile reflux. Helicobacter pylori is considered a major risk factor for gastric cancer in the intact stomach. It has been shown previously that antral cell proliferation is increased in H pylori gastritis and falls to normal levels after eradication of the organism. Little is known of corpus cell proliferation in H pylori gastritis or after gastric resection. Using in vitro bromodeoxyuridine labelling of endoscopic biopsy specimens we have found that corpus cell proliferation is increased in H pylori gastritis. Cell proliferation was greater in corpus biopsy specimens of resected stomachs than in H pylori gastritis. Subgroup analysis of patients who had undergone gastric resection indicated that those positive for H pylori had higher levels of cell proliferation than those negative for the organism. These findings provide further evidence that H pylori and bile have a role in gastric carcinogenesis and suggest that their presence has a synergistic effect on gastric epithelial cell proliferation.
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PMCID: PMC1382443  PMID: 7698691
4.  Cell proliferation in Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis and the effect of eradication therapy. 
Gut  1995;36(3):346-350.
Helicobacter pylori causes chronic (type B) gastritis. The 'intestinal' form of gastric cancer arises against a background of chronic gastritis, and prospective epidemiological studies have shown that H pylori is a major risk factor for this. An increase in mucosal cell proliferation increases the likelihood of a neoplastic clone of epithelial cells emerging where there is chronic epithelial cell injury associated with H pylori gastritis. In vitro bromodeoxyuridine labelling of endoscopic antral biopsy specimens was used to measure mucosal cell proliferation in H pylori associated gastritis before and after therapy for H pylori triple infection. Cell proliferation was increased in H pylori associated gastritis patients compared with normal controls and patients with H pylori negative chronic gastritis (p = 0.0001; Tukey's Studentised range). There was no difference in antral epithelial cell proliferation between duodenal ulcer and non-ulcer subjects infected with H pylori (p = 0.62; Student's t test). Antral mucosal cell proliferation fell four weeks after completing triple therapy, irrespective of whether or not H pylori had been eradicated (p = 0.0001). At retesting six to 18 months later (mean = 12 months), however, those in whom H pylori had not been successfully eradicated showed increased mucosal proliferation compared with both H pylori negative subjects at a similar follow up interval and all cases (whether H pylori positive or negative) four weeks after completion of triple therapy (p = 0.024). These findings suggest that H pylori infection causes increased gastric cell proliferation and in this way may play a part in gastric carcinogenesis.
PMCID: PMC1382442  PMID: 7698690

Results 1-4 (4)