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1.  Serum insulin and glucose response to graded exercise in adults. Part II. The effect of exercise conditioning. 
The effect of conditioning to severe exercise upon serum immunoreactive insulin levels (IRI) and serum glucose concentrations (GC) was studied in active and sedentary groups of middle-aged men. The responses of serum IRI and serum GC were determined during graded cycle ergometer exercise which required similar low and high relative work intensities, before (pre) and after (post) a four month physical fitness programme. Both groups demonstrated a marked decline in serum IRI during high intensity exercise from pre to post tests, and a tendency to maintain serum, GC (sedentary group) or elevate serum GC (active group) during exercise, following the conditioning programme. The data provides evidence of a bi-directional response of serum IRI and serum GC to graded exercise, with only minor modifications in the response patterns resulting from exercise conditioning.
PMCID: PMC1859654  PMID: 719323
2.  Serum insulin and glucose response to graded exercise in adults. Part I: the influence of fitness status. 
The effect of acute exercise upon serum immunoreactive insulin levels (IRI) and serum glucose concentrations (GC) was studied in groups of middle-aged men of contrasting physical fitness status. Two groups of subjects, one active and one sedentary (both N = 11, mean age 44 years), performed a graded cycle ergometer exercise test in the post-absorptive state. Venous blood samples were taken at rest, during low and high work intensities, and after recovery. The response of serum IRI to exercise was similar in both groups of subjects with significant increases observed during exercise followed by a return to resting values during recovery. However, the magnitude of serum IRI response was lower in the active group. In contrast, the sedentary group demonstrated little or no change in serum GC during exercise, whereas significant increases in serum GC were observed during exercise in the active group.
PMCID: PMC1859642  PMID: 687888

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