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1.  No Survival Benefit with Empirical Vancomycin Therapy for Coagulase-negative Staphylococcal Bloodstream Infections in Infants 
Background
Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) is the most common cause of bloodstream infections (BSI) in hospitalized infants. CoNS BSI is most reliably treated with vancomycin; however, concerns about side effects and promoting resistance often delay empirical vancomycin therapy until culture results become available.
Methods
All infants with CoNS BSI discharged from 348 neonatal intensive care units managed by the Pediatrix Medical Group from 1997–2012 were identified. Empirical vancomycin therapy was defined as vancomycin exposure on the day of the first positive blood culture. Delayed vancomycin therapy was defined as vancomycin exposure 1–3 days after the first positive blood culture. We used multivariable logistic regression with random effects for site to evaluate the association between the use of empirical vancomycin therapy vs. delayed vancomycin therapy and 30-day mortality, controlling for gestational age, small-for-gestational age status, postnatal age on the day of the first positive culture, oxygen requirement, ventilator support, and inotropic support on the day the first positive culture was obtained.
Results
Of the 4364 infants with CoNS BSI, 2848 (65%) were treated with empirical vancomycin. The median postnatal age at first positive culture was 14 days (interquartile range: 9, 21). Unadjusted 30-day mortality was similar for infants treated with empirical vancomycin and infants treated with delayed vancomycin therapy (166/2848 [6%] vs. 69/1516 [4%]; p=0.08). There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality on multivariable analysis (odds ratio: 1.14 [0.84, 1.56]). The median duration of bacteremia was 1 day longer for infants with delayed vancomycin therapy (4 days [interquartile range 2, 6] vs. 3 days [2, 5]; p<0.0001).
Conclusions
The median duration of bacteremia was 1 day longer in infants with CoNS BSI who received delayed vancomycin therapy. Despite this finding, empirical vancomycin therapy for CoNS BSI was not associated with improved mortality.
doi:10.1097/INF.0000000000000573
PMCID: PMC4357312  PMID: 25760564
late-onset sepsis; NICU
2.  Coagulase-negative Staphylococcal Infections in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit 
Background
Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are the most commonly isolated pathogens in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). CoNS infections are associated with increased morbidity including neurodevelopmental impairment.
Objective
Describe the epidemiology of CoNS infections in the NICU. Determine mortality among infants with definite, probable, or possible CoNS infections.
Methods
We performed a retrospective cohort study of all blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid cultures from infants <121 postnatal days.
Setting
248 NICUs managed by the Pediatrix Medical Group from 1997 to 2009.
Results
We identified 16,629 infants with 17,624 episodes of CoNS infection: 1734 (10%) definite, 3093 (17%) probable, and 12,797 (73%) possible infections. Infants with lower gestational age and birth weight had a higher incidence of CoNS infection. Controlling for gestational age, birth weight, and 5-minute Apgar score, infants with definite, probable, or possible CoNS infection had lower mortality—OR=0.74 (95% confidence interval; 0.61, 0.89), OR= 0.68 (0.59, 0.79), and OR=0.69 (0.63, 0.76)—compared to infants with negative cultures (P<0.001). No significant difference in overall mortality was found in infants with definite CoNS infection compared to those with probable or possible CoNS infection—OR=0.93 (0.75, 1.16) and OR=0.85 (0.70, 1.03), respectively.
Conclusions
CoNS infection was strongly related to lower gestational age and birth weight. Infants with clinical sepsis and culture-positive CoNS infection had lower mortality rates than infants with clinical sepsis and negative blood culture results. No difference in mortality between infants diagnosed with definite, probable, or possible CoNS infection was observed.
doi:10.1086/660361
PMCID: PMC3238054  PMID: 21666399
nosocomial infection; infant; prematurity; Staphylococcus
3.  Daptomycin Use in Infants: Report of Two Cases with Peak and Trough Drug Concentrations 
We report two infants treated with daptomycin for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection and describe peak and trough blood concentrations measured during therapy. The peak concentrations were 41.7 mcg/ml and 36.7 mcg/ml, and the 12-hour trough concentrations were 12.7 mcg/ml and 16.3 mcg/ml, respectively. Even though the infants received higher doses than adults, their drug concentrations were comparable to those observed in adults treated with regular dosing of daptomycin.
doi:10.1038/sj.jp.7211898
PMCID: PMC2752140  PMID: 18309318
Staphylococcus aureus; neonates; daptomycin; premature; drug concentration

Results 1-3 (3)