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1.  Thermal Unfolding Pathway of PHD2 Catalytic Domain in Three Different PHD2 Species: Computational Approaches 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(10):e47061.
Prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 containing protein (PHD2) is a key protein in regulation of angiogenesis and metastasis. In normoxic condition, PHD2 triggers the degradation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) that induces the expression of hypoxia response genes. Therefore the correct function of PHD2 would inhibit angiogenesis and consequent metastasis of tumor cells in normoxic condition. PHD2 mutations were reported in some common cancers. However, high levels of HIF-1α protein were observed even in normoxic metastatic tumors with normal expression of wild type PHD2. PHD2 malfunctions due to protein misfolding may be the underlying reason of metastasis and invasion in such cases. In this study, we scrutinize the unfolding pathways of the PHD2 catalytic domain’s possible species and demonstrate the properties of their unfolding states by computational approaches. Our study introduces the possibility of aggregation disaster for the prominent species of PHD2 during its partial unfolding. This may justify PHD2 inability to regulate HIF-1α level in some normoxic tumor types.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0047061
PMCID: PMC3471951  PMID: 23077544
2.  Structural Mechanism of S-Adenosyl Methionine Binding to Catechol O-Methyltransferase 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(8):e24287.
Methyltransferases possess a homologous domain that requires both a divalent metal cation and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to catalyze its reactions. The kinetics of several methyltransferases has been well characterized; however, the details regarding their structural mechanisms have remained unclear to date. Using catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) as a model, we perform discrete molecular dynamics and computational docking simulations to elucidate the initial stages of cofactor binding. We find that COMT binds SAM via an induced-fit mechanism, where SAM adopts a different docking pose in the absence of metal and substrate in comparison to the holoenzyme. Flexible modeling of the active site side-chains is essential for observing the lowest energy state in the apoenzyme; rigid docking tools are unable to recapitulate the pose unless the appropriate side-chain conformations are given a priori. From our docking results, we hypothesize that the metal reorients SAM in a conformation suitable for donating its methyl substituent to the recipient ligand. The proposed mechanism enables a general understanding of how divalent metal cations contribute to methyltransferase function.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0024287
PMCID: PMC3164188  PMID: 21904625

Results 1-2 (2)