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1.  Psoriasiform dermatitis is driven by IL-36–mediated DC-keratinocyte crosstalk 
The Journal of Clinical Investigation  2012;122(11):3965-3976.
Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the skin affecting approximately 2% of the world’s population. Accumulating evidence has revealed that the IL-23/IL-17/IL-22 pathway is key for development of skin immunopathology. However, the role of keratinocytes and their crosstalk with immune cells at the onset of disease remains poorly understood. Here, we show that IL-36R–deficient (Il36r–/–) mice were protected from imiquimod-induced expansion of dermal IL-17–producing γδ T cells and psoriasiform dermatitis. Furthermore, IL-36R antagonist-deficient (Il36rn–/–) mice showed exacerbated pathology. TLR7 ligation on DCs induced IL-36–mediated crosstalk with keratinocytes and dermal mesenchymal cells that was crucial for control of the pathological IL-23/IL-17/IL-22 axis and disease development. Notably, mice lacking IL-23, IL-17, or IL-22 were less well protected from disease compared with Il36r–/– mice, indicating an additional distinct activity of IL-36 beyond induction of the pathological IL-23 axis. Moreover, while the absence of IL-1R1 prevented neutrophil infiltration, it did not protect from acanthosis and hyperkeratosis, demonstrating that neutrophils are dispensable for disease manifestation. These results highlight a central and unique IL-1–independent role for IL-36 in control of the IL-23/IL-17/IL-22 pathway and development of psoriasiform dermatitis.
doi:10.1172/JCI63451
PMCID: PMC3484446  PMID: 23064362
2.  Costimulation through B7-2 (CD86) Is Required for the Induction of a Lung Mucosal T Helper Cell 2 (TH2) Immune Response and Altered Airway Responsiveness 
The Journal of Experimental Medicine  1997;185(9):1671-1680.
The recruitment of eosinophils into the airways after allergen exposure is dependent on interleukin (IL) 5 secreted from antigen-specific CD4+ T cells of the T helper cell (Th) 2 subset. However, while it is established that costimulation through CD28 is required for TCR-mediated activation and IL-2 production, the importance of this mechanism for the induction of a Th2 immune response is less clear. In the present study, we administered the fusion protein CTLA-4 immunoglobulin (Ig) into the lungs before allergen provocation to determine whether CD28/CTLA-4 ligands are required for allergen-induced eosinophil accumulation and the production of Th2 cytokines. Administration of CTLA-4 Ig inhibited the recruitment of eosinophils into the lungs by 75% and suppressed IgE in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. CTLA-4 Ig also inhibited the production of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10 by 70–80% and enhanced interferon-γ production from CD3–T cell receptor–activated lung Thy1.2+ cells. Allergen exposure upregulated expression of B7-2, but not B7-1, on B cells from the lung within 24 h. Moreover, airway administration of an anti-B7-2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) inhibited eosinophil infiltration, IgE production, and Th2 cytokine secretion comparable in magnitude to that observed with CTLA-4 Ig. Treatment with an anti-B7-1 mAb had a small, but significant effect on eosinophil accumulation, although was less effective in inhibiting Th2 cytokine production. The anti-B7-2, but not anti-B7-1, mAb also inhibited antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo. In all of the parameters assessed, the combination of both the anti-B7-1 and anti-B7-2 mAb was no more effective than anti-B7-2 mAb treatment alone. We propose that strategies aimed at inhibition of CD28 interactions with B7-2 molecules may represent a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of lung mucosal allergic inflammation.
PMCID: PMC2196297  PMID: 9151904
3.  Inducible Costimulator Protein (Icos) Controls T Helper Cell Subset Polarization after Virus and Parasite Infection 
It has been shown that certain pathogens can trigger efficient T cell responses in the absence of CD28, a key costimulatory receptor expressed on resting T cells. Inducible costimulator protein (ICOS) is an inducible costimulator structurally and functionally related to CD28. Here, we show that in the absence of CD28 both T helper cell type 1 (Th1) and Th2 responses were impaired but not abrogated after infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Inhibition of ICOS in CD28-deficient mice further reduced Th1/Th2 polarization. Blocking of ICOS alone had a limited but significant capacity to downregulate Th subset development. In contrast, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses, which are regulated to a minor and major extent by CD28 after LCMV and VSV infection, respectively, remained unaffected by blocking ICOS. Together, our results demonstrate that ICOS regulates both CD28-dependent and CD28-independent CD4+ subset (Th1 and Th2) responses but not CTL responses in vivo.
PMCID: PMC1887704  PMID: 10880526
ICOS; CD28; Th1/Th2; Nippostrongylus brasiliensis; LCMV

Results 1-3 (3)