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1.  Different Indices of Fetal Growth Predict Bone Size and Volumetric Density at 4 Years of Age 
We have demonstrated previously that higher birth weight is associated with greater peak and later-life bone mineral content and that maternal body build, diet, and lifestyle influence prenatal bone mineral accrual. To examine prenatal influences on bone health further, we related ultrasound measures of fetal growth to childhood bone size and density. We derived Z-scores for fetal femur length and abdominal circumference and conditional growth velocity from 19 to 34 weeks’ gestation from ultrasound measurements in participants in the Southampton Women’s Survey. A total of 380 of the offspring underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at age 4 years [whole body minus head bone area (BA), bone mineral content (BMC), areal bone mineral density (aBMD), and estimated volumetric BMD (vBMD)]. Volumetric bone mineral density was estimated using BMC adjusted for BA, height, and weight. A higher velocity of 19- to 34-week fetal femur growth was strongly associated with greater childhood skeletal size (BA: r = 0.30, p < .0001) but not with volumetric density (vBMD: r = 0.03, p = .51). Conversely, a higher velocity of 19- to 34-week fetal abdominal growth was associated with greater childhood volumetric density (vBMD: r = 0.15, p = .004) but not with skeletal size (BA: r = 0.06, p = .21). Both fetal measurements were positively associated with BMC and aBMD, indices influenced by both size and density. The velocity of fetal femur length growth from 19 to 34 weeks’ gestation predicted childhood skeletal size at age 4 years, whereas the velocity of abdominal growth (a measure of liver volume and adiposity) predicted volumetric density. These results suggest a discordance between influences on skeletal size and volumetric density.
doi:10.1359/jbmr.091022
PMCID: PMC3793299  PMID: 20437610
EPIDEMIOLOGY; OSTEOPOROSIS; PROGRAMMING; DEVELOPMENTAL ORIGINS
2.  Specific psychological variables predict quality of diet in women of lower, but not higher, educational attainment 
Appetite  2010;56(1):46-52.
Our previous work found that perceived control over life was a significant predictor of the quality of diet of women of lower educational attainment. In this paper, we explore the influence on quality of diet of a range of psychological and social factors identified during focus group discussions, and specify the way this differs in women of lower and higher educational attainment. We assessed educational attainment, quality of diet, and psycho-social factors in 378 women attending Sure Start Children’s Centres and baby clinics in Southampton, UK. Multiple-group path analysis showed that in women of lower educational attainment, the effect of general self-efficacy on quality of diet was mediated through perceptions of control and through food involvement, but that there were also direct effects of social support for healthy eating and having positive outcome expectancies. There was no effect of self-efficacy, perceived control or outcome expectancies on the quality of diet of women of higher educational attainment, though having more social support and food involvement were associated with improved quality of diet in these women. Our analysis confirms our hypothesis that control-related factors are more important in determining dietary quality in women of lower educational attainment than in women of higher educational attainment.
doi:10.1016/j.appet.2010.11.003
PMCID: PMC3685814  PMID: 21078352
educational attainment; diet; disadvantage; self-efficacy; perceived control
3.  The Southampton Initiative for Health: a complex intervention to improve the diets and increase the physical activity levels of women and children from disadvantaged communities 
Journal of health psychology  2010;16(1):178-191.
The ‘Southampton Initiative for Health’ (SIH) is a training intervention with Sure Start Children’s Centre staff designed to improve the diets and physical activity levels of women of child-bearing age. Training aims to help staff to support women in making changes to their lifestyles by improving three skills: reflection on current practice; asking ‘open discovery’ questions; and goal setting. The impact of the training on staff practice is being assessed. A before and after non-randomised controlled trial is being used to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the intervention in improving women’s diets and increasing their physical activity levels.
doi:10.1177/1359105310371397
PMCID: PMC3685267  PMID: 20709878
diet; physical activity; reflexive practice; goal setting; self-efficacy; intervention, disadvantage
4.  Recommendations for standardization and phenotype definitions in genetic studies of osteoarthritis: the TREAT-OA consortium 
Objective
To address the need for standardization of osteoarthritis (OA) phenotypes by examining the effect of heterogeneity among symptomatic (SOA) and radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA) phenotypes.
Methods
Descriptions of OA phenotypes of the 28 studies involved in the TREAT-OA consortium were collected. To investigate whether different OA definitions result in different association results, we created hip OA definitions used within the consortium in the Rotterdam Study-I and tested the association of hip OA with gender, age and BMI using one-way ANOVA. For radiographic OA, we standardized the hip, knee and hand ROA definitions and calculated prevalence's of ROA before and after standardization in 9 cohort studies. This procedure could only be performed in cohort studies and standardization of SOA definitions was not feasible at this moment.
Results
In this consortium, all studies with symptomatic OA phenotypes (knee, hip and hand) used a different definition and/or assessment of OA status. For knee, hip and hand radiographic OA 5, 4 and 7 different definitions were used, respectively. Different hip OA definitions do lead to different association results. For example, we showed in the Rotterdam Study-I that hip OA defined as “at least definite JSN and one definite osteophyte” was not associated with gender (p=0.22), but defined as “at least one definite osteophyte” was significantly associated with gender (p=3×10−9). Therefore, a standardization process was undertaken for radiographic OA definitions. Before standardization a wide range of ROA prevalence's was observed in the 9 cohorts studied. After standardization the range in prevalence of knee and hip ROA was small. Standardization of SOA phenotypes was not possible due to the case-control design of the studies.
Conclusion
Phenotype definitions influence the prevalence of OA and association with clinical variables. ROA phenotypes within the TREAT-OA consortium were standardized to reduce heterogeneity and improve power in future genetics studies.
doi:10.1016/j.joca.2010.10.027
PMCID: PMC3236091  PMID: 21059398
5.  Common genetic determinants of vitamin D insufficiency: a genome-wide association study 
Wang, Thomas J. | Zhang, Feng | Richards, J. Brent | Kestenbaum, Bryan | van Meurs, Joyce B. | Berry, Diane | Kiel, Douglas | Streeten, Elizabeth A. | Ohlsson, Claes | Koller, Daniel L. | Palotie, Leena | Cooper, Jason D. | O'Reilly, Paul F. | Houston, Denise K. | Glazer, Nicole L. | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Peacock, Munro | Shi, Julia | Rivadeneira, Fernando | McCarthy, Mark I. | Anneli, Pouta | de Boer, Ian H. | Mangino, Massimo | Kato, Bernet | Smyth, Deborah J. | Booth, Sarah L. | Jacques, Paul F. | Burke, Greg L. | Goodarzi, Mark | Cheung, Ching-Lung | Wolf, Myles | Rice, Kenneth | Goltzman, David | Hidiroglou, Nick | Ladouceur, Martin | Hui, Siu L. | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Hocking, Lynne J. | Hart, Deborah | Arden, Nigel K. | Cooper, Cyrus | Malik, Suneil | Fraser, William D. | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Zhai, Guangju | Macdonald, Helen | Forouhi, Nita G. | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Reid, David M. | Hakim, Alan | Dennison, Elaine | Liu, Yongmei | Power, Chris | Stevens, Helen E. | Jaana, Laitinen | Vasan, Ramachandran S. | Soranzo, Nicole | Bojunga, Jörg | Psaty, Bruce M. | Lorentzon, Mattias | Foroud, Tatiana | Harris, Tamara B. | Hofman, Albert | Jansson, John-Olov | Cauley, Jane A. | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | Gibson, Quince | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Karasik, David | Siscovick, David S. | Econs, Michael J. | Kritchevsky, Stephen B. | Florez, Jose C. | Todd, John A. | Dupuis, Josee | Hypponen, Elina | Spector, Timothy D.
Lancet  2010;376(9736):180-188.
Background
Vitamin D is crucial for maintaining musculoskeletal health. Recently, vitamin D insufficiency has been linked to a number of extraskeletal disorders, including diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Determinants of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) include sun exposure and dietary intake, but its high heritability suggests that genetic determinants may also play a role.
Methods
We performed a genome-wide association study of 25-OH D among ∼30,000 individuals of European descent from 15 cohorts. Five cohorts were designated as discovery cohorts (n=16,125), five as in silico replication cohorts (n=9,366), and five as de novo replication cohorts (n=8,378). Association results were combined using z-score-weighted meta-analysis. Vitamin D insufficiency was defined as 25-OH D <75 nmol/L or <50 nmol/L.
Findings
Variants at three loci reached genome-wide significance in the discovery cohorts, and were confirmed in the replication cohorts: 4p12 (overall P=1.9 × 10-109 for rs2282679, in GC); 11q12 (P=2.1 × 10-27 for rs12785878, near DHCR7); 11p15 (P=3.3 × 10-20 for rs10741657, near CYP2R1). Variants at an additional locus (20q13, CYP24A1) were genome-wide significant in the pooled sample (P=6.0 × 10-10 for rs6013897). A genotype score was constructed using the three confirmed variants. Those in the top quartile of genotype scores had 2- to 2.5-fold elevated odds of vitamin D insufficiency (P≤1 × 10-26).
Interpretation
Variants near genes involved in cholesterol synthesis (DHCR7), hydroxylation (CYP2R1, CYP24A1), and vitamin D transport (GC) influence vitamin D status. Genetic variation at these loci identifies individuals of European descent who have substantially elevated risk of vitamin D insufficiency.
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)60588-0
PMCID: PMC3086761  PMID: 20541252
6.  Weight gain in pregnancy and childhood body composition: findings from the Southampton Women’s Survey 
Background
Intrauterine life may be a critical period for the programming of later obesity, but there is conflicting evidence about whether pregnancy weight gain is an important determinant of offspring adiposity.
Objective
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of pregnancy weight gain with neonatal and childhood body composition.
Design
The participants (n=948) were children born to women in the Southampton Women’s Survey who had dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry measurements of body composition at birth, 4 or 6 years. Pregnancy weight gain was derived from the mothers’ measured weights before pregnancy and at 34 weeks gestation, analyzed using 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM) categories (inadequate, adequate or excessive), and as a continuous measure.
Results
Almost half (49%) the children were born to women who gained excessive weight in pregnancy. In comparison with children born to women with adequate weight gain, they had a greater fat mass in the neonatal period (0.17 SD (95% CI 0.02, 0.32), P=0.03), at 4 years (0.17 SD (0.00, 0.34), P=0.05) and at 6 years (0.30 SD (0.11, 0.49), P=0.002). Greater pregnancy weight gain, as a continuous measure, was associated with greater neonatal fat mass (0.10 SD per 5kg weight gain (0.04, 0.15), P=0.0004) and, weakly, with fat mass at 6 years (0.07 SD per 5kg (0.00, 0.14), P=0.05), but not at 4 years (0.02 SD per 5kg (−0.04, 0.08), P=0.55).
Conclusions
Appropriate pregnancy weight gain, as defined by 2009 IOM recommendations, is linked to lower levels of adiposity in the offspring.
doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.29128
PMCID: PMC3091013  PMID: 20375187
7.  Detailed Physiologic Characterization Reveals Diverse Mechanisms for Novel Genetic Loci Regulating Glucose and Insulin Metabolism in Humans 
Diabetes  2010;59(5):1266-1275.
OBJECTIVE
Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed loci associated with glucose and insulin-related traits. We aimed to characterize 19 such loci using detailed measures of insulin processing, secretion, and sensitivity to help elucidate their role in regulation of glucose control, insulin secretion and/or action.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
We investigated associations of loci identified by the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC) with circulating proinsulin, measures of insulin secretion and sensitivity from oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs), euglycemic clamps, insulin suppression tests, or frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests in nondiabetic humans (n = 29,084).
RESULTS
The glucose-raising allele in MADD was associated with abnormal insulin processing (a dramatic effect on higher proinsulin levels, but no association with insulinogenic index) at extremely persuasive levels of statistical significance (P = 2.1 × 10−71). Defects in insulin processing and insulin secretion were seen in glucose-raising allele carriers at TCF7L2, SCL30A8, GIPR, and C2CD4B. Abnormalities in early insulin secretion were suggested in glucose-raising allele carriers at MTNR1B, GCK, FADS1, DGKB, and PROX1 (lower insulinogenic index; no association with proinsulin or insulin sensitivity). Two loci previously associated with fasting insulin (GCKR and IGF1) were associated with OGTT-derived insulin sensitivity indices in a consistent direction.
CONCLUSIONS
Genetic loci identified through their effect on hyperglycemia and/or hyperinsulinemia demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in associations with measures of insulin processing, secretion, and sensitivity. Our findings emphasize the importance of detailed physiological characterization of such loci for improved understanding of pathways associated with alterations in glucose homeostasis and eventually type 2 diabetes.
doi:10.2337/db09-1568
PMCID: PMC2857908  PMID: 20185807
8.  New genetic loci implicated in fasting glucose homeostasis and their impact on type 2 diabetes risk 
Dupuis, Josée | Langenberg, Claudia | Prokopenko, Inga | Saxena, Richa | Soranzo, Nicole | Jackson, Anne U | Wheeler, Eleanor | Glazer, Nicole L | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Gloyn, Anna L | Lindgren, Cecilia M | Mägi, Reedik | Morris, Andrew P | Randall, Joshua | Johnson, Toby | Elliott, Paul | Rybin, Denis | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Henneman, Peter | Grallert, Harald | Dehghan, Abbas | Hottenga, Jouke Jan | Franklin, Christopher S | Navarro, Pau | Song, Kijoung | Goel, Anuj | Perry, John R B | Egan, Josephine M | Lajunen, Taina | Grarup, Niels | Sparsø, Thomas | Doney, Alex | Voight, Benjamin F | Stringham, Heather M | Li, Man | Kanoni, Stavroula | Shrader, Peter | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Kumari, Meena | Qi, Lu | Timpson, Nicholas J | Gieger, Christian | Zabena, Carina | Rocheleau, Ghislain | Ingelsson, Erik | An, Ping | O’Connell, Jeffrey | Luan, Jian'an | Elliott, Amanda | McCarroll, Steven A | Payne, Felicity | Roccasecca, Rosa Maria | Pattou, François | Sethupathy, Praveen | Ardlie, Kristin | Ariyurek, Yavuz | Balkau, Beverley | Barter, Philip | Beilby, John P | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Benediktsson, Rafn | Bennett, Amanda J | Bergmann, Sven | Bochud, Murielle | Boerwinkle, Eric | Bonnefond, Amélie | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Borch-Johnsen, Knut | Böttcher, Yvonne | Brunner, Eric | Bumpstead, Suzannah J | Charpentier, Guillaume | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Chines, Peter | Clarke, Robert | Coin, Lachlan J M | Cooper, Matthew N | Cornelis, Marilyn | Crawford, Gabe | Crisponi, Laura | Day, Ian N M | de Geus, Eco | Delplanque, Jerome | Dina, Christian | Erdos, Michael R | Fedson, Annette C | Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje | Forouhi, Nita G | Fox, Caroline S | Frants, Rune | Franzosi, Maria Grazia | Galan, Pilar | Goodarzi, Mark O | Graessler, Jürgen | Groves, Christopher J | Grundy, Scott | Gwilliam, Rhian | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hadjadj, Samy | Hallmans, Göran | Hammond, Naomi | Han, Xijing | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Hayward, Caroline | Heath, Simon C | Hercberg, Serge | Herder, Christian | Hicks, Andrew A | Hillman, David R | Hingorani, Aroon D | Hofman, Albert | Hui, Jennie | Hung, Joe | Isomaa, Bo | Johnson, Paul R V | Jørgensen, Torben | Jula, Antti | Kaakinen, Marika | Kaprio, Jaakko | Kesaniemi, Y Antero | Kivimaki, Mika | Knight, Beatrice | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm | Lathrop, G Mark | Lawlor, Debbie A | Le Bacquer, Olivier | Lecoeur, Cécile | Li, Yun | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Mahley, Robert | Mangino, Massimo | Manning, Alisa K | Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa | McAteer, Jarred B | McCulloch, Laura J | McPherson, Ruth | Meisinger, Christa | Melzer, David | Meyre, David | Mitchell, Braxton D | Morken, Mario A | Mukherjee, Sutapa | Naitza, Silvia | Narisu, Narisu | Neville, Matthew J | Oostra, Ben A | Orrù, Marco | Pakyz, Ruth | Palmer, Colin N A | Paolisso, Giuseppe | Pattaro, Cristian | Pearson, Daniel | Peden, John F | Pedersen, Nancy L. | Perola, Markus | Pfeiffer, Andreas F H | Pichler, Irene | Polasek, Ozren | Posthuma, Danielle | Potter, Simon C | Pouta, Anneli | Province, Michael A | Psaty, Bruce M | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Rayner, Nigel W | Rice, Kenneth | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Roden, Michael | Rolandsson, Olov | Sandbaek, Annelli | Sandhu, Manjinder | Sanna, Serena | Sayer, Avan Aihie | Scheet, Paul | Scott, Laura J | Seedorf, Udo | Sharp, Stephen J | Shields, Beverley | Sigurðsson, Gunnar | Sijbrands, Erik J G | Silveira, Angela | Simpson, Laila | Singleton, Andrew | Smith, Nicholas L | Sovio, Ulla | Swift, Amy | Syddall, Holly | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Tanaka, Toshiko | Thorand, Barbara | Tichet, Jean | Tönjes, Anke | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Uitterlinden, André G | van Dijk, Ko Willems | van Hoek, Mandy | Varma, Dhiraj | Visvikis-Siest, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Vogelzangs, Nicole | Waeber, Gérard | Wagner, Peter J | Walley, Andrew | Walters, G Bragi | Ward, Kim L | Watkins, Hugh | Weedon, Michael N | Wild, Sarah H | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witteman, Jaqueline C M | Yarnell, John W G | Zeggini, Eleftheria | Zelenika, Diana | Zethelius, Björn | Zhai, Guangju | Zhao, Jing Hua | Zillikens, M Carola | Borecki, Ingrid B | Loos, Ruth J F | Meneton, Pierre | Magnusson, Patrik K E | Nathan, David M | Williams, Gordon H | Hattersley, Andrew T | Silander, Kaisa | Salomaa, Veikko | Smith, George Davey | Bornstein, Stefan R | Schwarz, Peter | Spranger, Joachim | Karpe, Fredrik | Shuldiner, Alan R | Cooper, Cyrus | Dedoussis, George V | Serrano-Ríos, Manuel | Morris, Andrew D | Lind, Lars | Palmer, Lyle J | Hu, Frank B. | Franks, Paul W | Ebrahim, Shah | Marmot, Michael | Kao, W H Linda | Pankow, James S | Sampson, Michael J | Kuusisto, Johanna | Laakso, Markku | Hansen, Torben | Pedersen, Oluf | Pramstaller, Peter Paul | Wichmann, H Erich | Illig, Thomas | Rudan, Igor | Wright, Alan F | Stumvoll, Michael | Campbell, Harry | Wilson, James F | Hamsten, Anders | Bergman, Richard N | Buchanan, Thomas A | Collins, Francis S | Mohlke, Karen L | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T | Altshuler, David | Rotter, Jerome I | Siscovick, David S | Penninx, Brenda W J H | Boomsma, Dorret | Deloukas, Panos | Spector, Timothy D | Frayling, Timothy M | Ferrucci, Luigi | Kong, Augustine | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Stefansson, Kari | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Aulchenko, Yurii S | Cao, Antonio | Scuteri, Angelo | Schlessinger, David | Uda, Manuela | Ruokonen, Aimo | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Waterworth, Dawn M | Vollenweider, Peter | Peltonen, Leena | Mooser, Vincent | Abecasis, Goncalo R | Wareham, Nicholas J | Sladek, Robert | Froguel, Philippe | Watanabe, Richard M | Meigs, James B | Groop, Leif | Boehnke, Michael | McCarthy, Mark I | Florez, Jose C | Barroso, Inês
Nature genetics  2010;42(2):105-116.
Circulating glucose levels are tightly regulated. To identify novel glycemic loci, we performed meta-analyses of 21 genome-wide associations studies informative for fasting glucose (FG), fasting insulin (FI) and indices of β-cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in up to 46,186 non-diabetic participants. Follow-up of 25 loci in up to 76,558 additional subjects identified 16 loci associated with FG/HOMA-B and two associated with FI/HOMA-IR. These include nine new FG loci (in or near ADCY5, MADD, ADRA2A, CRY2, FADS1, GLIS3, SLC2A2, PROX1 and FAM148B) and one influencing FI/HOMA-IR (near IGF1). We also demonstrated association of ADCY5, PROX1, GCK, GCKR and DGKB/TMEM195 with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Within these loci, likely biological candidate genes influence signal transduction, cell proliferation, development, glucose-sensing and circadian regulation. Our results demonstrate that genetic studies of glycemic traits can identify T2D risk loci, as well as loci that elevate FG modestly, but do not cause overt diabetes.
doi:10.1038/ng.520
PMCID: PMC3018764  PMID: 20081858
9.  Objective measures of physical capability and subsequent health: a systematic review 
Age and Ageing  2010;40(1):14-23.
Background: measures of physical capability may be predictive of subsequent health, but existing published studies have not been systematically reviewed. We hypothesised that weaker grip strength, slower walking speed and chair rising and shorter standing balance time, in community-dwelling populations, would be associated with higher subsequent risk of fracture, cognitive outcomes, cardiovascular disease, hospitalisation and institutionalisation.
Methods: studies were identified through systematic searches of the electronic databases MEDLINE and EMBASE (to May 2009). Reference lists of eligible papers were also manually searched.
Results: twenty-four papers had examined the associations between at least one physical capability measure and one of the outcomes. As the physical capability measures and outcomes had been assessed and categorised in different ways in different studies, and there were differences in the potential confounding factors taken into account, this made it impossible to pool results. There were more studies examining fractures than other outcomes, and grip strength and walking speed were the most commonly examined capability measures. Most studies found that weaker grip strength and slower walking speed were associated with increased risk of future fractures and cognitive decline, but residual confounding may explain results in some studies. Associations between physical capability levels and the other specified outcomes have not been tested widely.
Conclusions: there is some evidence to suggest that objective measures of physical capability may be predictors of subsequent health in older community-dwelling populations. Most hypothesised associations have not been studied sufficiently to draw definitive conclusions suggesting the need for further research.
doi:10.1093/ageing/afq117
PMCID: PMC3000177  PMID: 20843964
grip strength; walking speed; chair rises; standing balance; fracture; cognitive outcomes; cardiovascular disease; systematic review
10.  Impact of Prevalent Fractures on Quality of Life: Baseline Results From the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women 
Mayo Clinic Proceedings  2010;85(9):806-813.
OBJECTIVE: To examine several dimensions of health-related quality of life (HRQL) in postmenopausal women who report previous fractures, and to provide perspective by comparing these findings with those in other chronic conditions (diabetes, arthritis, lung disease).
PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fractures are a major cause of morbidity among older women. Few studies have examined HRQL in women who have had prior fractures and the effect of prior fracture location on HRQL. In this observational study of 57,141 postmenopausal women aged 55 years and older (enrollment from December 2007 to March 2009) from 17 study sites in 10 countries, HRQL was measured using the European Quality of Life 5 Dimensions Index (EQ-5D) and the health status, physical function, and vitality questions of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36).
RESULTS: Reductions in EQ-5D health-utility scores and SF-36–measured health status, physical function, and vitality were seen in association with 9 of 10 fracture locations. Spine, hip, and upper leg fractures resulted in the greatest reductions in quality of life (EQ-5D scores, 0.62, 0.64, and 0.61, respectively, vs 0.79 without prior fracture). Women with fractures at any of these 3 locations, as well as women with a history of multiple fractures (EQ-5D scores, 0.74 for 1 prior fracture, 0.68 for 2, and 0.58 for ≥3), had reductions in HRQL that were similar to or worse than those in women with other chronic diseases (0.67 for diabetes, 0.69 for arthritis, and 0.71 for lung disease).
CONCLUSION: Previous fractures at a variety of bone locations, particularly spine, hip, and upper leg, or involving more than 1 location are associated with significant reductions in quality of life.
This observational study of 57,141 postmenopausal women shows that previous fractures at a variety of bone locations, particularly the spine, hip, and upper leg, or involving more than 1 location are associated with significant reductions in quality of life.
doi:10.4065/mcp.2010.0082
PMCID: PMC2931616  PMID: 20634496
11.  Genetic variation in GIPR influences the glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose challenge 
Saxena, Richa | Hivert, Marie-France | Langenberg, Claudia | Tanaka, Toshiko | Pankow, James S | Vollenweider, Peter | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Dupuis, Josée | Jackson, Anne U | Kao, W H Linda | Li, Man | Glazer, Nicole L | Manning, Alisa K | Luan, Jian’an | Stringham, Heather M | Prokopenko, Inga | Johnson, Toby | Grarup, Niels | Boesgaard, Trine W | Lecoeur, Cécile | Shrader, Peter | O’Connell, Jeffrey | Ingelsson, Erik | Couper, David J | Rice, Kenneth | Song, Kijoung | Andreasen, Camilla H | Dina, Christian | Köttgen, Anna | Le Bacquer, Olivier | Pattou, François | Taneera, Jalal | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Rybin, Denis | Ardlie, Kristin | Sampson, Michael | Qi, Lu | van Hoek, Mandy | Weedon, Michael N | Aulchenko, Yurii S | Voight, Benjamin F | Grallert, Harald | Balkau, Beverley | Bergman, Richard N | Bielinski, Suzette J | Bonnefond, Amelie | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Borch-Johnsen, Knut | Böttcher, Yvonne | Brunner, Eric | Buchanan, Thomas A | Bumpstead, Suzannah J | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Charpentier, Guillaume | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Chines, Peter S | Collins, Francis S | Cornelis, Marilyn | Crawford, Gabriel J | Delplanque, Jerome | Doney, Alex | Egan, Josephine M | Erdos, Michael R | Firmann, Mathieu | Forouhi, Nita G | Fox, Caroline S | Goodarzi, Mark O | Graessler, Jürgen | Hingorani, Aroon | Isomaa, Bo | Jørgensen, Torben | Kivimaki, Mika | Kovacs, Peter | Krohn, Knut | Kumari, Meena | Lauritzen, Torsten | Lévy-Marchal, Claire | Mayor, Vladimir | McAteer, Jarred B | Meyre, David | Mitchell, Braxton D | Mohlke, Karen L | Morken, Mario A | Narisu, Narisu | Palmer, Colin N A | Pakyz, Ruth | Pascoe, Laura | Payne, Felicity | Pearson, Daniel | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Sandbaek, Annelli | Sayer, Avan Aihie | Scott, Laura J | Sharp, Stephen J | Sijbrands, Eric | Singleton, Andrew | Siscovick, David S | Smith, Nicholas L | Sparsø, Thomas | Swift, Amy J | Syddall, Holly | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Tönjes, Anke | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T | Waeber, Gérard | Walley, Andrew | Waterworth, Dawn M | Zeggini, Eleftheria | Zhao, Jing Hua | Illig, Thomas | Wichmann, H Erich | Wilson, James F | van Duijn, Cornelia | Hu, Frank B | Morris, Andrew D | Frayling, Timothy M | Hattersley, Andrew T | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Stefansson, Kari | Nilsson, Peter | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Shuldiner, Alan R | Walker, Mark | Bornstein, Stefan R | Schwarz, Peter | Williams, Gordon H | Nathan, David M | Kuusisto, Johanna | Laakso, Markku | Cooper, Cyrus | Marmot, Michael | Ferrucci, Luigi | Mooser, Vincent | Stumvoll, Michael | Loos, Ruth J F | Altshuler, David | Psaty, Bruce M | Rotter, Jerome I | Boerwinkle, Eric | Hansen, Torben | Pedersen, Oluf | Florez, Jose C | McCarthy, Mark I | Boehnke, Michael | Barroso, Inês | Sladek, Robert | Froguel, Philippe | Meigs, James B | Groop, Leif | Wareham, Nicholas J | Watanabe, Richard M
Nature genetics  2010;42(2):142-148.
Glucose levels 2 h after an oral glucose challenge are a clinical measure of glucose tolerance used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. We report a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies (n = 15,234 nondiabetic individuals) and a follow-up of 29 independent loci (n = 6,958–30,620). We identify variants at the GIPR locus associated with 2-h glucose level (rs10423928, β (s.e.m.) = 0.09 (0.01) mmol/l per A allele, P = 2.0 × 10−15). The GIPR A-allele carriers also showed decreased insulin secretion (n = 22,492; insulinogenic index, P = 1.0 × 10−17; ratio of insulin to glucose area under the curve, P = 1.3 × 10−16) and diminished incretin effect (n = 804; P = 4.3 × 10−4). We also identified variants at ADCY5 (rs2877716, P = 4.2 × 10−16), VPS13C (rs17271305, P = 4.1 × 10−8), GCKR (rs1260326, P = 7.1 × 10−11) and TCF7L2 (rs7903146, P = 4.2 × 10−10) associated with 2-h glucose. Of the three newly implicated loci (GIPR, ADCY5 and VPS13C), only ADCY5 was found to be associated with type 2 diabetes in collaborating studies (n = 35,869 cases, 89,798 controls, OR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.09–1.15, P = 4.8 × 10−18).
doi:10.1038/ng.521
PMCID: PMC2922003  PMID: 20081857
12.  Long-term treatment with bisphosphonates and their safety in postmenopausal osteoporosis 
Bisphosphonates are the leading drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis. In randomized controlled trials (RCTs), alendronate, risedronate, and zoledronate have shown to reduce the risk of vertebral, nonvertebral, and hip fractures, whereas RCTs with ibandronate show antifracture efficacy at vertebral sites. Bisphosphonates are generally well tolerated and safe. Nevertheless, adverse events have been noted, and it is important to consider the strength of the evidence for causal relationships. Effects on the gastrointestinal tract and kidney function are well recognized, as are transient acute-phase reactions. Atrial fibrillation was first identified as a potential adverse event in a zoledronate trial, but subsequent trials and analyses failed to substantiate an association with bisphosphonates. Case reports have suggested a relationship between oral bisphosphonates and esophageal cancer, but this has not been demonstrated in epidemiologic studies. A possible association between bisphosphonate use and osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) has also been suggested. However, the risk of ONJ in patients with osteoporosis appears to be very low, with no evidence from prospective RCTs of a causal association. There are reports of occasional occurrence of subtrochanteric or diaphyseal fractures in osteoporotic patients, but an association with bisphosphonate therapy is not substantiated by epidemiologic studies or prospective RCTs.
PMCID: PMC2909499  PMID: 20668715
bisphosphonates; osteoporosis; safety
13.  Hertfordshire sarcopenia study: design and methods 
BMC Geriatrics  2010;10:43.
Background
Sarcopenia is defined as the loss of muscle mass and strength with age. Although a number of adult influences are recognised, there remains considerable unexplained variation in muscle mass and strength between older individuals. This has focused attention on influences operating earlier in life. Our objective for this study was to identify life course influences on muscle mass and strength in an established birth cohort and develop methodology for collection of muscle tissue suitable to investigate underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms.
Methods
One hundred and five men from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS), born between 1931 and 1939 who have historical records of birth weight and weight at one year took part in the Hertfordshire Sarcopenia Study (HSS). Each participant consented for detailed characterisation of muscle mass, muscle function and aerobic capacity. In addition, a muscle biopsy of the vastus lateralis using a Weil-Blakesley conchotome was performed. Data on muscle mass, function and aerobic capacity was collected on all 105 participants. Muscle biopsy was successfully carried out in 102 participants with high rates of acceptability. No adverse incidents occurred during the study.
Discussion
The novel approach of combining epidemiological and basic science characterisation of muscle in a well established birth cohort will allow the investigation of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying life course influences on sarcopenia.
doi:10.1186/1471-2318-10-43
PMCID: PMC2909243  PMID: 20587018
14.  Maternal Diet, Behaviour and Offspring Skeletal Health 
Osteoporotic fracture has a major impact upon health, both in terms of acute and long term disability and economic cost. Peak bone mass, achieved in early adulthood, is a major determinant of osteoporosis risk in later life. Poor early growth predicts reduced bone mass, and so risk of fracture in later life. Maternal lifestyle, body build and 25(OH) vitamin D status predict offspring bone mass. Recent work has suggested epigenetic mechanisms as key to these observations. This review will explore the role of the early environment in determining later osteoporotic fracture risk.
doi:10.3390/ijerph7041760
PMCID: PMC2872349  PMID: 20617058
osteoporosis; epigenetic; early life origins; fracture; bone mass; vitamin D; neonate; fetus
15.  Baseline observations from the POSSIBLE EU® study: characteristics of postmenopausal women receiving bone loss medications 
Archives of Osteoporosis  2010;5(1-2):61-72.
Summary
Prospective Observational Scientific Study Investigating Bone Loss Experience in Europe (POSSIBLE EU®) is an ongoing longitudinal cohort study that utilises physician- and patient-reported measures to describe the characteristics and management of postmenopausal women on bone loss therapies. We report the study design and baseline characteristics of 3,402 women recruited from general practice across five European countries.
Purpose
The POSSIBLE EU® is a study describing the characteristics and management of postmenopausal women receiving bone loss medications.
Methods
Between 2005 and 2008, general practitioners enrolled postmenopausal women initiating, switching or continuing treatment with bone loss treatment in France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK. Patients and physicians completed questionnaires at study entry and at 3-month intervals, for 1 year.
Results
Of 3,402 women enrolled (mean age 68.2 years [SD] 9.83), 96% were diagnosed with low bone mass; 55% of these using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Most women (92%) had comorbidities. Mean minimum T score (hip or spine) at diagnosis was −2.7 (SD 0.89; median −2.7 [interquartile range, −3.2, −2.2]) indicating low bone mineral density. Almost 40% of the women had prior fractures in adulthood, mostly non-vertebral, non-hip in nature, 30% of whom had at least two fractures and more than half experienced moderate/severe pain or fatigue. Bisphosphonates were the most common type of bone loss treatment prescribed in the 12 months preceding the study.
Conclusions
POSSIBLE EU® characterises postmenopausal women with low bone mass, exhibiting a high rate of prevalent fracture, substantial bone fragility and overall comorbidity burden. Clinical strategies for managing osteoporosis in this population varied across the five participating European countries, reflecting their different guidelines, regulations and standards of care.
doi:10.1007/s11657-010-0035-7
PMCID: PMC3010211  PMID: 21258637
Cohort studies; Osteoporosis; Postmenopausal osteoporosis; Prospective studies

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