PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-2 (2)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Beclin 1 deficiency is associated with increased hypoxia-induced angiogenesis 
Autophagy  2011;7(8):829-839.
Beclin 1, a tumor suppressor protein, acts as an initiator of autophagy in mammals. Heterozygous disruption of Beclin 1 accelerates tumor growth, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We examined the role of Beclin 1 in tumor proliferation and angiogenesis, using a primary mouse melanoma tumor model. Beclin 1 (Becn1+/−) hemizygous mice displayed an aggressive tumor growth phenotype with increased angiogenesis under hypoxia, associated with enhanced levels of circulating erythropoietin but not vascular endothelial growth factor, relative to wild-type mice. Using in vivo and ex vivo assays, we demonstrated increased angiogenic activity in Becn1+/− mice relative to wild-type mice. Endothelial cells from Becn1+/− mice displayed increased proliferation, migration and tube formation in response to hypoxia relative to wild-type cells. Moreover, Becn1+/− cells subjected to hypoxia displayed increased hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) expression relative to HIF-1α. Genetic interference of HIF-2α but not HIF-1α, dramatically reduced hypoxia-inducible proliferation, migration and tube formation in Becn1+/− endothelial cells. We demonstrated that mice deficient in the autophagic protein Beclin 1 display a pro-angiogenic phenotype associated with the upregulation of HIF-2α and increased erythropoietin production. These results suggest a relationship between Beclin 1 and the regulation of angiogenesis, with implications in tumor growth and development.
doi:10.4161/auto.7.8.15598
PMCID: PMC3149693  PMID: 21685724
angiogenesis; autophagy; beclin 1; hypoxia-inducible factor
2.  Carbon monoxide inhibits Fas activating antibody-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells 
Background
The extrinsic apoptotic pathway initiates when a death ligand, such as the Fas ligand, interacts with its cell surface receptor (ie., Fas/CD95), forming a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). The Fas-dependent apoptotic pathway has been implicated in several models of lung or vascular injury. Carbon monoxide, an enzymatic product of heme oxygenase-1, exerts antiapoptotic effects at low concentration in vitro and in vivo.
Methods
Using mouse lung endothelial cells (MLEC), we examined the antiapoptotic potential of carbon monoxide against apoptosis induced by the Fas/CD95-activating antibody (Jo2). Carbon monoxide was applied to cell cultures in vitro. The expression and/or activation of apoptosis-related proteins and signaling intermediates were determined using Western Immunoblot and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Cell death was monitored by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays. Statistical significance was determined by student T-test and a value of P < 0.05 was considered significant.
Results
Treatment of MLEC with Fas-activating antibody (Jo2) induced cell death associated with the formation of the DISC, and activation of caspases (-8, -9, and -3), as well as the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein Bax. Exposure of MLEC to carbon monoxide inhibited Jo2-induced cell death, which correlated with the inhibition of DISC formation, cleavage of caspases-8, -9, and -3, and Bax activation. Carbon monoxide inhibited the phosphorylation of the Fas-associated death domain-containing protein, as well as its association with the DISC. Furthermore, carbon monoxide induced the expression of the antiapoptotic protein FLIP and increased its association with the DISC.
CO-dependent cytoprotection against Fas mediated apoptosis in MLEC depended in part on activation of ERK1/2-dependent signaling.
Conclusions
Carbon monoxide has been proposed as a potential therapy for lung and other diseases based in part on its antiapoptotic effects in endothelial cells. In vitro, carbon monoxide may inhibit both Fas/caspase-8 and Bax-dependent apoptotic signaling pathways induced by Fas-activating antibody in endothelial cells. Strategies to block Fas-dependent apoptotic pathways may be useful in development of therapies for lung or vascular disorders.
doi:10.1186/2045-9912-1-8
PMCID: PMC3231877  PMID: 22146483

Results 1-2 (2)