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1.  Disparities in survival after Hodgkin lymphoma: a population-based study 
Cancer causes & control : CCC  2009;20(10):1881-1892.
Survival after Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is generally favorable, but may vary by patient demographic characteristics. The authors examined HL survival according to race/ethnicity and neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES), determined from residential census block group at diagnosis. For 12,492 classical HL patients ≥15 years diagnosed in California during 1988-2006 and followed through 2007, we determined risk of overall and HL-specific death using Cox proportional hazards regression; analyses were stratified by age and Ann Arbor stage. Irrespective of disease stage, patients with lower neighborhood SES had worse overall and HL-specific survival than patients with higher SES. Patients with the lowest quintile of neighborhood SES had a 64% (patients aged 15-44 years) and 36% (≥45 years) increased risk of HL-death compared to patients with the highest quintile of SES; SES results were similar for overall survival. Even after adjustment for neighborhood SES, blacks and Hispanics had increased risks of HL-death 74% and 43% (15-44 years) and 40% and 17% (≥45 years), respectively, higher than white patients. The racial/ethnic differences in survival were evident for all stages of disease. These data provide evidence for substantial, and probably remediable, racial/ethnic and neighborhood SES disparities in HL outcomes.
doi:10.1007/s10552-009-9382-3
PMCID: PMC2888633  PMID: 19557531
Hodgkin disease; survival; mortality; social class; census
2.  Body Size, Recreational Physical Activity, and B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk Among Women in the California Teachers Study 
American Journal of Epidemiology  2009;170(10):1231-1240.
Nutritional status and physical activity are known to alter immune function, which may be relevant to lymphomagenesis. The authors examined body size measurements and recreational physical activity in relation to risk of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in the prospective California Teachers Study. Between 1995 and 2007, 574 women were diagnosed with incident B-cell NHL among 121,216 eligible women aged 22–84 years at cohort entry. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by fitting Cox proportional hazards models for all B-cell NHL combined and for the 3 most common subtypes: diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma. Height was positively associated with risk of all B-cell NHLs (for >1.70 vs. 1.61–1.65 m, relative risk = 1.50, 95% confidence interval: 1.16, 1.96) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (relative risk = 1.93, 95% confidence interval: 1.09, 3.41). Weight and body mass index at age 18 years were positive predictors of B-cell NHL risk overall. These findings indicate that greater height, which may reflect genetics, early life immune function, infectious exposures, nutrition, or growth hormone levels, may play a role in NHL etiology. Adiposity at age 18 years may be more relevant to NHL etiology than that in later life.
doi:10.1093/aje/kwp268
PMCID: PMC2781760  PMID: 19822569
body mass index; body size; cohort studies; exercise; hip; lymphoma, non-Hodgkin; waist-hip ratio
3.  Long-term and recent recreational physical activity and survival after breast cancer: the California Teachers Study 
Introduction
Long-term physical activity is associated with lower breast cancer risk. Little information exists on its association with subsequent survival.
Methods
California Teachers Study cohort members provided information in 1995–1996 on long-term (high school through age 54 years) and recent (past 3 years) participation in moderate and strenuous recreational physical activities. The 3,539 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer after cohort entry and through December 31, 2004, were followed through December 31, 2005. Of these, 460 women died, 221 from breast cancer. Moderate and strenuous physical activities were combined into low (≤0.50 hr/wk/yr of any activity), intermediate (0.51–3.0 hr/wk/yr of moderate or strenuous activity but no activity >3.0 hr/wk/yr) or high activity (>3.0 hr/wk/yr of either activity type). Multivariable relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for mortality were estimated using Cox proportional hazards methods, adjusting for race/ethnicity, estrogen receptor status, disease stage, and baseline information on comorbidities, body mass index, and caloric intake.
Results
Women with high or intermediate levels of long-term physical activity had lower risk of breast cancer death (RR=0.53, 95% CI=0.35–0.80; and RR=0.65, 95% CI=0.45–0.93, respectively) than women with low activity levels. These associations were consistent across estrogen receptor status and disease stage, but confined to overweight women. Deaths due to causes other than breast cancer were related only to recent activity.
Conclusions
Consistent long-term participation in physical activity before breast cancer diagnosis may lower risk of breast cancer death, providing further justification for public health strategies to increase physical activity throughout the lifespan.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0538
PMCID: PMC2783945  PMID: 19843680
4.  Uncovering disparities in survival after non-small-cell lung cancer among Asian/Pacific Islander ethnic populations in California 
Asians may have better survival after non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) than non-Asians. However, it is unknown whether survival varies among the heterogeneous U.S. Asian/Pacific Islander (API) populations. Therefore, this study aimed to quantify survival differences among APIs with NSCLC. Differences in overall and disease-specific survival were analyzed in the California Cancer Registry among 16,577 API patients diagnosed with incident NSCLC between 1988 and 2007. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models with separate baseline hazards by disease stage. Despite better overall and disease-specific survival among APIs compared with non-Hispanic Whites, differences were evident across API populations. Among women, Japanese (overall survival HR=1.16, 95% CI=1.06–1.27) and APIs other than those in the six largest ethnic groups (“other APIs”; HR=1.19, 95% CI=1.07–1.33) had significantly poorer overall and disease-specific survival than Chinese. By contrast, South Asian women had significantly better survival than Chinese (HR=0.79, 95% CI=0.63–0.97). Among men, Japanese (HR=1.15, 95% CI=1.07–1.24), Vietnamese (HR=1.07, 95% CI=1.00–1.16), and other APIs (HR=1.18, 95% CI=1.08–1.28) had significantly poorer overall and disease-specific survival than Chinese. Other factors independently associated with poorer survival were lower neighborhood SES, involvement with a non-university-teaching hospital, unmarried status, older age, and earlier year of diagnosis. APIs have significant ethnic differences in NSCLC survival that may be related to disparate lifestyles, biology, and especially health care access or use. To reduce the nationwide burden of lung cancer mortality, it is critical to identify and ameliorate hidden survival disparities such as those among APIs.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0332
PMCID: PMC2764550  PMID: 19622719
non-small-cell lung cancer; survival; Asian Americans; Pacific Islanders; ethnic groups
5.  Pre-diagnosis reproductive factors and all-cause mortality for women with breast cancer in the Breast Cancer Family Registry 
Studies have examined the prognostic relevance of reproductive factors prior to breast cancer (BC) diagnosis, but most have been small and overall their findings inconclusive. Associations between reproductive risk factors and all-cause mortality after BC diagnosis were assessed using a population-based cohort of 3,107 women of white European ancestry with invasive BC (1,130 from Melbourne and Sydney, Australia; 1,441 from Ontario, Canada; and 536 from Northern California, USA). During follow-up with a median of 8.5 years, 567 deaths occurred. At recruitment, questionnaire data were collected on oral contraceptive use, number of full-term pregnancies, age at first full-term pregnancy, time from last full-term pregnancy to BC diagnosis, breastfeeding, age at menarche and menopause and menopausal status at BC diagnosis. Hazard ratios (HR) for all-cause mortality were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models with and without adjustment for age at diagnosis, study center, education and body mass index. Compared with nulliparous women, those who had a child up to 2 years, or between 2 to 5 years, prior to their BC diagnosis were more likely to die. The unadjusted HR estimates were 2.75 (95%CI=1.98–3.83, p<0.001) and 2.20 (95%CI=1.65–2.94, p<0.001), respectively, and the adjusted estimates were 2.25 (95%CI=1.59–3.18, p<0.001) and 1.82 (95%CI=1.35–2.46, p<0.001), respectively). When evaluating the prognosis of women recently diagnosed with BC, the time since last full-term pregnancy should be routinely considered along with other established host and tumor prognostic factors, but consideration of other reproductive factors may not be warranted.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-1014
PMCID: PMC2746957  PMID: 19505912
Breast cancer; survival; reproductive; outcome; pregnancy
6.  Polymorphic variation in NFKB1 and other aspirin-related genes and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma 
We found that regular use of aspirin may reduce the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a common cancer of adolescents and young adults in the US. To explore possible biological mechanisms underlying this association, we investigated whether polymorphic variation in genes involved in nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and inhibition, other inflammatory pathways, and aspirin metabolism influences HL risk. Twenty single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in seven genes were genotyped in DNA from 473 classical HL cases and 373 controls enrolled between 1997 and 2000 in a population-based case-control study in the Boston, Massachusetts, metropolitan area and the state of Connecticut. We selected target genes and SNPs primarily using a candidate-SNP approach and estimated haplotypes using the expectation-maximization algorithm. We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for associations with HL risk. HL risk was significantly associated with rs1585215 in NFKB1 (AG vs. AA: OR=2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.5–2.9; GG vs. AA: OR=3.5, 95% CI=2.2–5.7, Ptrend=1.7×10−8) and with NFKB1 haplotypes (Pglobal=6.0×10−21). Similar associations were apparent across categories of age, sex, tumor Epstein-Barr virus status, tumor histology, and regular aspirin use, although statistical power was limited for stratified analyses. Nominally significant associations with HL risk were detected for SNPs in NFKBIA and CYP2C9. HL risk was not associated with SNPs in IKKA/CHUK, PTGS2/COX2, UDP1A6, or LTC4S. In conclusion, genetic variation in the NF-κB pathway appears to influence risk of HL. Pooled studies are needed to detect any heterogeneity in the association with NF-κB across HL subgroups, including aspirin users and non-users.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-1130
PMCID: PMC2720066  PMID: 19223558
Hodgkin lymphoma; genetic polymorphism; nuclear factor kappa B; NFKB1 protein; aspirin; case-control
7.  Reproductive Factors and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk in the California Teachers Study 
PLoS ONE  2009;4(12):e8135.
Background
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a malignancy etiologically linked to immunomodulatory exposures and disorders. Endogenous female sex hormones may modify immune function and influence NHL risk. Few studies have examined associations between reproductive factors, which can serve as surrogates for such hormonal exposures, and NHL risk by subtype.
Methodology/Principal Findings
Women in the California Teachers Study cohort provided detailed data in 1995–1996 on reproductive history. Follow-up through 2007 identified 574 women with incident B-cell NHL. Hazard rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models to assess associations between reproductive factors and all B-cell NHL combined, diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, follicular lymphomas, and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemias/small lymphocytic lymphomas. Pregnancy was marginally associated with lower risk of B-cell NHL (RR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.68–1.04). Much of the reduction in risk was observed after one full-term pregnancy relative to nulligravid women (RR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.54–1.06; P for trend <0.01), particularly for diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (P for trend = 0.13), but not among women who had only incomplete pregnancies. Age at first full-term pregnancy was marginally inversely associated with B-cell NHL risk overall (P for trend = 0.08) and for diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (P for trend = 0.056). Breast feeding was not associated with B-cell NHL risk overall or by subtype.
Conclusions
Full-term pregnancy and early age at first full-term pregnancy account for most of the observed reduction in B-cell NHL risk associated with gravidity. Pregnancy-related hormonal exposures, including prolonged and high-level exposure to progesterone during a full-term pregnancy may inhibit development of B-cell NHL.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0008135
PMCID: PMC2780313  PMID: 19956586
8.  Recent trends in breast cancer incidence in US white women by county-level urban/rural and poverty status 
BMC Medicine  2009;7:31.
Background
Unprecedented declines in invasive breast cancer rates occurred in the United States between 2001 and 2004, particularly for estrogen receptor-positive tumors among non-Hispanic white women over 50 years. To understand the broader public health import of these reductions among previously unstudied populations, we utilized the largest available US cancer registry resource to describe age-adjusted invasive and in situ breast cancer incidence trends for non-Hispanic white women aged 50 to 74 years overall and by county-level rural/urban and poverty status.
Methods
We obtained invasive and in situ breast cancer incidence data for the years 1997 to 2004 from 29 population-based cancer registries participating in the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries resource. Annual age-adjusted rates were examined overall and by rural/urban and poverty of patients' counties of residence at diagnosis. Joinpoint regression was used to assess trends by annual quarter of diagnosis.
Results
Between 2001 and 2004, overall invasive breast cancer incidence fell 13.2%, with greater reductions among women living in urban (-13.8%) versus rural (-7.5%) and low- (-13.0%) or middle- (-13.8%) versus high- (-9.6%) poverty counties. Most incidence rates peaked around 1999 then declined after second quarter 2002, although in rural counties, rates decreased monotonically after 1999. Similar but more attenuated patterns were seen for in situ cancers.
Conclusion
Breast cancer rates fell more substantially in urban and low-poverty, affluent counties than in rural or high-poverty counties. These patterns likely reflect a major influence of reductions in hormone therapy use after July 2002 but cannot exclude possible effects due to screening patterns, particularly among rural populations where hormone therapy use was probably less prevalent.
doi:10.1186/1741-7015-7-31
PMCID: PMC2714853  PMID: 19558637

Results 1-8 (8)