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1.  Polymorphic variation in NFKB1 and other aspirin-related genes and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma 
We found that regular use of aspirin may reduce the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a common cancer of adolescents and young adults in the US. To explore possible biological mechanisms underlying this association, we investigated whether polymorphic variation in genes involved in nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and inhibition, other inflammatory pathways, and aspirin metabolism influences HL risk. Twenty single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in seven genes were genotyped in DNA from 473 classical HL cases and 373 controls enrolled between 1997 and 2000 in a population-based case-control study in the Boston, Massachusetts, metropolitan area and the state of Connecticut. We selected target genes and SNPs primarily using a candidate-SNP approach and estimated haplotypes using the expectation-maximization algorithm. We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for associations with HL risk. HL risk was significantly associated with rs1585215 in NFKB1 (AG vs. AA: OR=2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.5–2.9; GG vs. AA: OR=3.5, 95% CI=2.2–5.7, Ptrend=1.7×10−8) and with NFKB1 haplotypes (Pglobal=6.0×10−21). Similar associations were apparent across categories of age, sex, tumor Epstein-Barr virus status, tumor histology, and regular aspirin use, although statistical power was limited for stratified analyses. Nominally significant associations with HL risk were detected for SNPs in NFKBIA and CYP2C9. HL risk was not associated with SNPs in IKKA/CHUK, PTGS2/COX2, UDP1A6, or LTC4S. In conclusion, genetic variation in the NF-κB pathway appears to influence risk of HL. Pooled studies are needed to detect any heterogeneity in the association with NF-κB across HL subgroups, including aspirin users and non-users.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-1130
PMCID: PMC2720066  PMID: 19223558
Hodgkin lymphoma; genetic polymorphism; nuclear factor kappa B; NFKB1 protein; aspirin; case-control
2.  Racial/ethnic variation in EBV-positive classical Hodgkin lymphoma in California populations 
Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is detected in the tumor cells of some but not all Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients, and evidence indicates that EBV-positive and –negative HL are distinct entities. Racial/ethnic variation in EBV-positive HL in international comparisons suggests etiologic roles for environmental and genetic factors, but these studies used clinical series and evaluated EBV presence by differing protocols. Therefore, we evaluated EBV presence in the tumors of a large (n=1,032), racially and sociodemographically diverse series of California incident classical HL cases with uniform pathology re-review and EBV detection methods. Tumor EBV-positivity was associated with Hispanic and Asian/Pacific Islander (API) but not black race/ethnicity, irrespective of demographic and clinical factors. Complex race-specific associations were observed between EBV-positive HL and age, sex, histology, stage, neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES), and birth place. In Hispanics, EBV-positive HL was associated not only with young and older age, male sex, and mixed cellularity histology, but also with foreign birth and lower SES in females, suggesting immune function responses to correlates of early childhood experience and later environmental exposures, respectively, as well as of pregnancy. For APIs, a lack of association with birth place may reflect the higher SES of API than Hispanic immigrants. In blacks, EBV-positive HL was associated with later-stage disease, consistent with racial/ethnic variation in certain cytokine polymorphisms. The racial/ethnic variation in our findings suggests that EBV-positive HL results from an intricate interplay of early- and later-life environmental, hormonal, and genetic factors leading to depressed immune function and poorly controlled EBV infection.
doi:10.1002/ijc.23741
PMCID: PMC2775059  PMID: 18646185
Hodgkin lymphoma; Epstein-Barr virus; racial/ethnic variation; epidemiology

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