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1.  Implications of incising the ventricular septum in double outlet right ventricle and in the Ross–Konno operation☆ 
Objective
Incision into the ventricular septum in complex biventricular repair is controversial, and has been blamed for impairing left ventricular function. This retrospective study evaluates the risk of a ventricular septal incision in patients undergoing double outlet right ventricle (DORV) repair and Ross–Konno procedure.
Methods
From January 2003 to September 2007, 11 patients with DORV had a ventricular septum (VS) incision and 12 DORV patients did not. Sixteen patients had a Ross–Konno, and 16 had an isolated Ross procedure. The ventricular septal incision was made to match at least the diameter of a normal aortic annulus. In DORV, the VSD was enlarged superiorly and to the left. In the Ross–Konno, the aortic annulus was enlarged towards the septum posteriorly and to the left.
Results
The median follow-up for the study is 19 months (1 month–4 years). For DORV, there were no significant differences in discharge mortality ( p = 0.22), late mortality ( p = 0.48), or late mortality plus heart transplant ( p = 0.093). Although patients with DORV and VSD enlargement have a more complex postoperative course, there were no differences in ECMO use ( p = 0.093), occurrence of permanent AV block ( p = 0.55), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ( p = 0.40), or shortening fraction (LVSF) ( p = 0.50). Similarly, for the Ross–Konno there were no significant differences in discharge mortality ( p = 0.30), late mortality ( p = NS), LVEF (p = 0.90) and LVSF ( p = 0.52) compared to the Ross, even though the Ross–Konno patients were significantly younger ( p < 0.0001).
Conclusion
Making a ventricular septal incision in DORV repair and in the Ross–Konno operation does not increase mortality and does not impair the LV function. The restriction of the VSD remains an important issue in the management of complex DORV. These encouraging results need to be confirmed by larger series.
doi:10.1016/j.ejcts.2008.12.035
PMCID: PMC3117298  PMID: 19269838
Double outlet right ventricle; Ventricular septal defect; Ross–Konno
2.  Long-Term Outcome of Palliation with Internal Pulmonary Artery Bands After Primary Heart Transplantation for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome 
Pediatric cardiology  2009;30(4):419-425.
The purpose of this study was to describe the long-term outcome of infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) who underwent placement of internal pulmonary artery bands as part of a transcatheter palliation procedure followed by primary heart transplantation. Transcatheter palliation included stenting of the ductus arteriosus, decompression of the left atrium by atrial septostomy, and internal pulmonary artery band placement. Cardiac hemodynamics, pulmonary artery architecture, and pulmonary artery growth since transplantation are described. Nine infants with HLHS had internal pulmonary artery bands placed and underwent successful heart transplant. No infant required reconstruction of the pulmonary arteries at the time of transplant. At 1 year after transplant, all of the recipients had normal mean pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, and transpulmonary gradient. Pulmonary angiography performed at 1 year after transplant demonstrated no distortion of pulmonary artery anatomy with significant interval growth of the branch pulmonary arteries. There was 100% survival to hospital discharge after transplant in this cohort of infants. Transcatheter placement of internal pulmonary artery bands for HLHS offers protection of the pulmonary vascular bed while preserving pulmonary artery architecture and growth with good long-term outcome.
doi:10.1007/s00246-009-9424-3
PMCID: PMC3117302  PMID: 19365660
Congenital heart disease; Heart catheterization; Heart transplant; Infant

Results 1-2 (2)