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1.  Comparative effectiveness of fish oil versus fenofibrate, gemfibrozil, and atorvastatin on lowering triglyceride levels among HIV-infected patients in routine clinical care 
Objective
The goal of this study was to compare the effectiveness of fish oil, fenofibrate, gemfibrozil, and atorvastatin on reducing triglyceride (TG) levels among a large cohort of HIV-infected patients in clinical care.
Design
Retrospective observational cohort study
Methods
The primary endpoint was absolute change in TG levels measured using the last TG value pre-treatment and the first TG value post-treatment. A pre-post quasi-experimental design was used to estimate the change in TG due to initiating fish oil. Linear regression models examined the comparative effectiveness of treatment with fish oil versus gemfibrozil, fenofibrate, or atorvastatin for TG reduction. Models were adjusted for baseline differences in age, sex, race, CD4+ cell count, diabetes, body mass index, protease inhibitor use, and time between TG measures.
Results
A total of 493 patients (mean age 46 years; 95% male) were included (46 receiving gemfibrozil, 80 fenofibrate, 291 atorvastatin, 76 fish oil) with a mean baseline TG of 347 mg/dL. New use of fish oil decreased TG (ΔTG -45 mg/dL 95% Confidence interval (CI):-80 to -11) in the pre-post study. Compared with fish oil (reference), fibrates were more effective (ΔTG -66; 95% CI:-120 to -12) in reducing TG levels, whereas atorvastatin was not (ΔTG -39; 95% CI:-86 to 9).
Conclusion
In HIV-infected patients in routine clinical care, fish oil is less effective than fibrates (but not atorvastatin) at lowering triglyceride values. Fish oil may still represent an attractive alternative for patients with moderately elevated triglycerides particularly among patients who may not want or tolerate fibrates.
doi:10.1097/QAI.0b013e3182a60e82
PMCID: PMC4112457  PMID: 23892238
fish oil; triglycerides; dyslipidemia; fibrates; HIV
2.  HIV Disease Progression in the First Year after Delivery among African Women followed in the HPTN 046 Clinical Trial 
Background
Starting lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected pregnant women may decrease HIV progression and transmission but adherence after delivery may be difficult, especially for asymptomatic women. We evaluated disease progression among HIV-infected women not on ART with CD4+ lymphocyte counts above 200 cells/uL at delivery.
Methods
We analysed risk of death, progression to AIDS (stage IV or CD4 < 200 cells/uL), or to CD4+ count < 350 one year after delivery among postpartum women enrolled to a prevention of breastfeeding transmission trial using Kaplan-Meier methods. In the primary analysis, women were censored if ART was initiated.
Results
Among 1285 women who were < WHO stage IV at 6 weeks postpartum, 49 (4.3%) progressed to stage IV/CD4 < 200 cells/uL or death by one year. Progression to CD4 < 200 or death occurred among 16 (4.3%) of 441 women with CD4 count of 350–549 and 10 (1.6%) of 713 with CD4 counts > 550 at delivery. CD4 < 350 by 12 months postpartum occurred among 116 (37.0%) of 350 women with CD4 count 400–549 and 48 (7.4%) of 713 > 550 at delivery.
Conclusions
Progression to AIDS or CD4 count < 350 is uncommon through one year postpartum for women with CD4 counts over 550 at delivery, but occurred in over one third of those with CD4 counts under 550. ART should be continued after delivery or breastfeeding among women with CD4 counts < 550 if follow up and ARV adherence can be maintained.
doi:10.1097/QAI.0b013e3182a2123a
PMCID: PMC3800257  PMID: 23846568
HIV; postpartum; disease progression
3.  Population Attributable Fractions for Late Postnatal Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV-1 in Sub-Saharan Africa 
Objectives
Assess population attributable fractions (PAFs) for late postnatal transmission (LPT) of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) in a cohort of HIV-1-exposed infants.
Methods
We used data established from a risk factor analysis of LPT (negative HIV-1 results through the 4-6 week visit, but positive assays thereafter through the 12-month visit) from a perinatal clinical trial conducted in three sub-Saharan countries. PAFs were calculated as the proportions of excess LPTs attributed to identified risk factors.
Results
For the cohort of 1317 infants, 206 (15.6%) had only low maternal CD4+ counts (< 200 cells/mm3), 332 (25.2%) had only high maternal plasma viral loads (VLs) (> 50 000 copies/mL), and 81 (6.2%) had both low CD4+ counts and high VLs. Their PAFs were 26.0% [95% confidence interval (CI), 12.0%-36.0%], 37.0% (95% CI, 22.0%-51.0%) and 16.0% (95% CI, 6.0%-25.0%), respectively.
Conclusions
Our PAF analysis illustrates the public health impact of the substantial proportion of LPTs accounted for by high-risk women with both low CD4+ counts and high VLs. In light of these results, access to and use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) by high-risk HIV-1-infected pregnant women is essential. Additional strategies to reduce LPT for those not meeting criteria for ART should be implemented.
doi:10.1097/QAI.0b013e3181d61c2e
PMCID: PMC3086731  PMID: 20224418
Breast feeding; late postnatal transmission; prevention of mother to child transmission/vertical transmission; risk factors; viral load
4.  Total Lymphocyte Count: not a surrogate marker for risk of death in HIV infected Ugandan children 
Objectives
To determine the utility of Total Lymphocyte Count (TLC) in predicting the 12 month mortality in HIV infected Ugandan children; to correlate TLC and CD4 cell %.
Design
This is a retrospective data analysis of clinical and laboratory data collected prospectively on 128 HIV infected children in the HIVNET 012 trial.
Methods
TLC and CD4 cell % measurements were obtained at birth, 14 weeks and 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months of age and assessed with respect to risk of death within 12 months.
Results
Median TLC/ul (CD4 cell %) were 4150 (41%) at birth, 4900 (24%) at 12 months, 4300 (19%) at 24 months, 4150 (19 %) at 36 months, 4100 (18%) at 48 months and 3800 (20%) at 60 months. The highest risk of mortality within 12 months was 34–37% at birth and declined to 13–15% at 24 months regardless of TLC measurement. The correlation between CD4 cell % and TLC was extremely low overall (r = 0.01).
Conclusion
The TLC did not predict a risk of progression to death within 12 months and therefore TLC alone may not be a useful surrogate marker for determining those children in greatest need for antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected Ugandan children.
doi:10.1097/QAI.0b013e318183a92a
PMCID: PMC2721476  PMID: 18769352
Total Lymphocyte Count; HIV; Africa; children

Results 1-4 (4)