PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-2 (2)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and subtypes in autopsy-confirmed dementia with Lewy bodies 
OBJECTIVE
To determine whether dementia with Lewy bodies with or without probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder differ clinically or pathologically.
METHODS
Patients with dementia with Lewy bodies who have probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior sleep disorder (n=71) were compared to those without it (n=19) on demographics, clinical variables (core features of dementia with Lewy bodies, dementia duration, rate of cognitive/motor changes) and pathologic indices (Lewy body distribution, neuritic plaque score, Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage).
RESULTS
Individuals with probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder were predominantly male (82% versus 47%), and had a shorter duration of dementia (mean 8 years versus 10 years), earlier onset of parkinsonism (mean 2 years versus 5 years), and earlier onset of visual hallucinations (mean 3 years versus 6 years). These patients also had a lower Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage (Stage IV versus Stage VI) and lower neuritic plaque scores (18% frequent versus 85% frequent), but no difference in Lewy body distribution. When probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder developed early (at or before dementia onset), the onset of parkinsonism and hallucinations was earlier and Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage was lower compared to those who developed the sleep disorder after dementia onset. Women with autopsy-confirmed DLB without a history of dream enactment behavior during sleep had a later onset of hallucinations and parkinsonism and a higher Braak NFT stage.
CONCLUSIONS
Probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is associated with distinct clinical and pathologic characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies.
doi:10.1002/mds.24003
PMCID: PMC3513369  PMID: 22038951
Parkinson’s disease; REM sleep behavior disorder; Dementia with Lewy bodies; Lewy body disease; Alzheimer’s disease
2.  Anatomical Differences between CBS-Corticobasal degeneration and CBS-Alzheimer’s Disease 
We compare patterns of grey matter loss on MRI in subjects presenting as corticobasal syndrome (CBS) with Alzheimer disease pathology (CBS-AD) to those presenting as CBS with corticobasal degeneration pathology (CBS-CBD). Voxel-based morphometry was used to compare patterns of grey matter loss in pathologically confirmed CBS-AD subjects (n=5) and CBS-CBD subjects (n=6) to a group of normal controls (n=20), and to each other. Atlas based parcellation using the automated anatomic labeling atlas was also utilized in a region-of-interest analysis to account for laterality. The CBS-AD subjects were younger at the time of scan compared to CBS-CBD subjects (median: 60 years vs 69; P=0.04). After adjusting for age at time of MRI scan, the CBS-AD subjects showed loss in posterior frontal, temporal, and superior and inferior parietal lobes, while CBS-CBD showed more focal loss predominantly in the posterior frontal lobes, compared to controls. In both CBS-AD and CBS-CBD groups there was basal ganglia volume loss, yet relative sparing of hippocampi. On direct comparisons between the two subject groups, CBS-AD showed greater loss in both temporal and inferior parietal cortices than CBS-CBD. No regions showed greater loss in the CBS-CBD group compared to the CBS-AD group. These findings persisted when laterality was taken into account. In subjects presenting with CBS, prominent temporoparietal, especially posterior temporal and inferior parietal, atrophy may be a clue to the presence of underlying AD pathology.
doi:10.1002/mds.23062
PMCID: PMC2921765  PMID: 20629131
Voxel based morphometry; Alzheimer’s disease; Corticobasal syndrome; Corticobasal degeneration; Region-of-Interest

Results 1-2 (2)